6

I am aware of this question and I agree with the answer, but can I do the following with log4net?

Instead of having:

2013-04-09 12:54:47.093 INFO Main: Line 1 Line 1 Line 1
Line 2 Line 2 Line 2 
Line 3 Line 3 Line 3
2013-04-09 12:54:47.093 INFO Main: Line 1 Line 1 Line 1
Line 2 Line 2 Line 2 
Line 3 Line 3 Line 3

Can I have:

2013-04-09 12:54:47.093 INFO Main: Line 1 Line 1 Line 1
                                   Line 2 Line 2 Line 2 
                                   Line 3 Line 3 Line 3
2013-04-09 12:54:47.093 INFO Main: Line 1 Line 1 Line 1
                                   Line 2 Line 2 Line 2 
                                   Line 3 Line 3 Line 3

Is it already supported or do I need to write a custom appender or a custom layout?

12

I hate to answer my own questions, but since I have developed the answer myself, I wanted to share it with you.

I extended log4net. The solution inherits from PatternLayout, so all PatternLayout features are available. In addition a new pattern %indentation is available. To get the logging like in the example above simply use:

<conversionPattern value="%date - %indentation%message%newline%exception"/>

When formatting exceptions log4net code is quirky (or I don't understand it). So in this case you should always put %exception in the pattern, because I hardcoded "IgnoresException = false". With IgnoresException = true, log4net completely ignores any formatting and you loose indentation.

Use code below to extend log4net:

/// <summary>
/// Converts %indentation to string
/// </summary>
public class IndentationPatternConverter : PatternConverter
{
    protected override void Convert(TextWriter writer, object state)
    {
        // do nothing - %indentation is used for indentation, so nothing should be written
    }
}

public class IndentationPatternLayout : PatternLayout
{
    private PatternConverter m_head;

    public override void Format(TextWriter writer, LoggingEvent loggingEvent)
    {
        if (writer == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("writer");
        }
        if (loggingEvent == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("loggingEvent");
        }

        PatternConverter c = m_head;

        IndentationWriter indentationWriter = new IndentationWriter(writer);
        // loop through the chain of pattern converters
        while (c != null)
        {
            if (c is IndentationPatternConverter)
            {
                indentationWriter.SetIndentation();
            }
            c.Format(indentationWriter, loggingEvent);
            c = c.Next;
        }
        indentationWriter.Finish();
    }

    override public void ActivateOptions()
    {
        PatternParser patternParser = CreatePatternParser(ConversionPattern);

        ConverterInfo converterInfo = new ConverterInfo()
        {
            Name = "indentation",
            Type = typeof(IndentationPatternConverter)
        };

        patternParser.PatternConverters.Add("indentation", converterInfo);
        m_head = patternParser.Parse();

        PatternConverter curConverter = m_head;
        this.IgnoresException = false;
    }
}

public class IndentationWriter : TextWriter
{
    TextWriter writer;
    int indentation = 0;
    List<string> lines = new List<string>();

    public IndentationWriter(TextWriter writer)
    {
        this.writer = writer;
    }
    public override Encoding Encoding
    {
        get { return writer.Encoding; }
    }

    public override void Write(string value)
    {
        string[] values = value.Split(new string[] { Environment.NewLine }, StringSplitOptions.None);
        for (int i = 0; i < values.Length; i++)
        {
            if (i > 0) values[i] = Environment.NewLine + values[i];
        }
        lines.AddRange(values);
    }

    public void Finish()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < lines.Count; i++)
        {
            string line = lines[i];
            if (i < lines.Count - 1) line = lines[i].Replace(Environment.NewLine, Environment.NewLine + new string(' ', indentation));
            writer.Write(line);
        }
        lines.Clear();
    }
    public override void WriteLine(string value)
    {
        this.Write(value + Environment.NewLine);
    }

    public void SetIndentation()
    {
        foreach (string line in lines)
        {
            indentation += line.Length;
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    Thanks for sharing this. When splitting the lines, I changed it to value.Split(new string[] { "\r\n", "\n" }, StringSplitOptions.None). – Sean Hall Aug 23 '13 at 14:02
  • 1
    Great, if it works for you better. I tend to use Environment.NewLine everywhere in my code, because it always returns the correct thing depending on the OS. Under Windows it will return "\r\n" and under Linux (Mono) it will return "\n". But if you need a mix of the two, then your solution can deal with that. – Eiver Aug 25 '13 at 20:44

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