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To temporarily edit the body of a packaged function func, I frequently use trace(func, edit=TRUE). For some reason, though, R isn't letting me do this when func is [.data.table:

## Note: In this and the other cases below, once an editor pops up, I save and 
## and then exit without making any edits to the function. The commented-out
## message below each call to trace() is what is then printed to my R console.

trace("[.data.table", where=data.table, edit=TRUE)
# Error in .makeTracedFunction(def, tracer, exit, at, print, doEdit) : 
#   the editing in trace() can only change the body of the function, not 
#   the arguments or defaults

Questions: What might be causing this error? What other functions also trigger it? For such functions, is there some alternative work-around that will allow me to edit them?

FWIW, this doesn't seem to be some general issue with functions in data.table's namespace (see e.g. #1 below) nor is it an issue with subset methods in general (see e.g. #2 below).

## (#1)     
trace("within.data.table", where=data.table, edit=TRUE)
# Tracing function "within.data.table" as seen from package "data.table"
# [1] "within.data.table"

## (#2)
trace("[.Date", edit=TRUE)
# Tracing function "[.Date" in package "base"
# [1] "[.Date"

I am running R-3.0.0 and data.table_1.8.8 on a Windows XP machine, and get the same error whether I use set options(editor="emacs"), options(editor="notepad") or use the R GUI's default editor.

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  • 2
    It works for me on 2.15.3 with data.table_1.8.6, Windows 7 Apr 10, 2013 at 17:02
  • 3
    However, I get the same error after upgrading to 1.8.8. Apr 10, 2013 at 17:10
  • @MatthewPlourde -- Thanks! That really helps narrow down the problem. Apr 10, 2013 at 17:12
  • I also get the same error after further upgrading to 1.8.9. Haven't yet tried 1.8.6 or 1.8.7 to determine which version first exhibits the changed behavior w.r.t. trace(). Apr 11, 2013 at 5:39
  • Hi. Have skimmed commit logs and NEWS comparing 1.8.6 to 1.8.8 and the only things that spring to mind are that rolltolast has moved after drop=NULL, and rollends has been added which has a default that works in a new style by calling c(). Something to do with that maybe since the error message mentions arguments and defaults, perhaps.
    – Matt Dowle
    Apr 11, 2013 at 15:58

1 Answer 1

5

This is apparently being caused by the recent addition of curly braces (i.e. {}) at one place in data.table's formal argument list.

First, a MRE to show that braces really do cause trace(..., edit=TRUE) to choke:

## Without braces, no problem
func <- function(inColor=FALSE, col = if(inColor) "red" else "grey") { 
    plot(rnorm(99), col=col)}

trace(func, edit=TRUE)
# [1] "func"


## With braces, tracing fails
funcB <- function(inColor=FALSE, col = if(inColor) "red" else {"grey"}) { 
    plot(rnorm(99), col=col)}

trace(funcB, edit=TRUE)
# Error in .makeTracedFunction(def, tracer, exit, at, print, doEdit) : 
#   the editing in trace() can only change the body of the function, not 
#   the arguments or defaults

Then, for the record, here are the formals for [.data.table in versions 1.8.6 (for which tracing works) and version 1.8.8 (for which it doesn't):

## Version 1.8.6 -- Tracing worked
function (x, i, j, by, keyby, with=TRUE, nomatch=getOption("datatable.nomatch"), 
    mult="all", roll=FALSE, rolltolast=FALSE, 
    which=FALSE, .SDcols, verbose=getOption("datatable.verbose"), drop=NULL)


## Version 1.8.8 -- Tracing doesn't (See {} in the 'rollends' argument)
function (x, i, j, by, keyby, with=TRUE, nomatch=getOption("datatable.nomatch"), 
    mult = "all", roll = FALSE, 
    rollends = if (roll == "nearest") c(TRUE, 
        TRUE) else {
        if (roll >= 0) 
            c(FALSE, TRUE)
        else c(TRUE, FALSE)
    }, 
    which = FALSE, .SDcols, verbose = getOption("datatable.verbose"), 
    allow.cartesian = getOption("datatable.allow.cartesian"), 
    drop = NULL, rolltolast = FALSE) 
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  • 2
    If somebody would be interested in preconfigured trace for [.data.table I built it as dtq package, It is also faster than using trace.
    – jangorecki
    Jun 1, 2015 at 10:07

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