3

A lot of classes has assignment operator (operator=) the same code as in destructor and than very similar code of copy constructor.

So is it good idea to implement the assignment in such way?

Point& operator=(const Point& point)
{
    if(&point != this)
    {
        //Call the destructor
        this->~Point();

        //Make the placement new
        //Assignment is made because some compilers optimise such code as just
        //  new Point;
        Point* p_n = new (this) Point(point);

        //We where placing in this place so pointers should be equal
        assert(p_n == this);
    }
    return *this;
}
  • 2
    If you do this, be sure to check &point != this first! – Angew Apr 10 '13 at 17:19
  • 2
    Also, this code is not exception safe - in case of exception in new (this) Point(point) there will be double destruction. Just use copy and swap idiom. – Evgeny Panasyuk Apr 10 '13 at 17:19
  • can the placement new raise exceptions? – Seagull Apr 10 '13 at 17:23
  • @Seagull, Point's ctor (or the type being constructed) can throw. – Jeff Paquette Apr 10 '13 at 17:23
  • 2
    @Seagull, "I was convienced that throwing from constructor is a terrible thing" - throwing from constructor is wonderful thing! It allows to enstablish object invariants and use it easily. – Evgeny Panasyuk Apr 10 '13 at 17:33
3

Herb Sutter has addressed this in one of his GotW articles. I recommend that you read it. His conclusion:

The original idiom is full of pitfalls, it's often wrong, and it makes life a living hell for the authors of derived classes. I'm sometimes tempted to post the above code in the office kitchen with the caption: "Here be dragons."

From the GotW coding standards:

  • prefer writing a common private function to share code between copying and copy assignment, if necessary; never use the trick of implementing copy assignment in terms of copy construction by using an explicit destructor followed by placement new, even though this trick crops up every three months on the newsgroups (i.e., never write:

    T& T::operator=( const T& other )
    {
        if( this != &other)
        {
            this->~T();             // evil
            new (this) T( other );  // evil
        }
        return *this;
    }
    
6

No. This is a bad idea, even though the C++ Standard uses this kind of thing as an example in a discussion of object lifetime. For a value type like Point it's not so bad, but if you derive from this class, this assignment implementation will change the type of the object from your derived type to Point; if there are virtual functions involved, you'll see a dramatic change in behavior.

  • In such case both assignment and copy constructors should be forbidden. My approach uses the copy constructor if it exists. Maybe I have not understood you. – Seagull Apr 10 '13 at 17:25
  • 1
    @Seagull - I thought your point was to implement the assignment operator. Implementing it this way sets a trap for users of such a class, and the result is deadly. Try it! – Pete Becker Apr 10 '13 at 17:32

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