1

I glanced at the SQL-92 standard, then at a SQL-92 grammar somebody put together but couldn't understand much.

As the SQL Server documentation reminds us, there are cases where the expressions should be explicitly grouped:

By default, SQL Server 2005 evaluates a statement that contains UNION operators from left to right. Use parentheses to specify the order of evaluation. For example, the following statements are not equivalent:

/* First statement. */
SELECT * FROM TableA
UNION ALL
(   SELECT * FROM TableB
   UNION
   SELECT * FROM TableC
)
GO

/* Second statement. */
(SELECT * FROM TableA
 UNION ALL
 SELECT * FROM TableB
)
UNION
SELECT * FROM TableC)
GO

In the first statement, duplicates are eliminated in the union between TableB and TableC. In the union between that set and TableA, duplicates are not eliminated. In the second statement, duplicates are included in the union between TableA and TableB, but are eliminated in the subsequent union with TableC. ALL has no effect on the final result of this expression.

But I have found that MySQL and SqlLite do not support it (for reference, Oracle, SQL Server, Postgres and DB2 do.)

So how can I check if the specs allow it or not?

  • What exactly is it that MySQL and SqlLite don't support? – Dan Bracuk Apr 10 '13 at 23:18
  • Formula like SELECT * FROM p UNION (SELECT * FROM p UNION SELECT * FROM p). – Adrian Panasiuk Apr 10 '13 at 23:23
0

Excerpt from the SQL-92 grammar, extracted from the SQL-92 standard and hyperlinked:

<direct select statement: multiple rows>    ::=   <query expression> [ <order by clause> ]

<query expression>    ::=   <non-join query expression> | <joined table>

<non-join query expression>    ::= 
         <non-join query term>
     |     <query expression>  UNION  [  ALL  ] [ <corresponding spec> ] <query term>
     |     <query expression>  EXCEPT  [  ALL  ] [ <corresponding spec> ] <query term>

<joined table>    ::= 
         <cross join>
     | <qualified join>
     | <left paren> <joined table> <right paren>

<non-join query term>    ::= 
         <non-join query primary>
     |     <query term>  INTERSECT  [  ALL  ] [ <corresponding spec> ] <query primary>

<query term>    ::=   <non-join query term> | <joined table>

<cross join>    ::= 
         <table reference>  CROSS  JOIN <table reference>

<qualified join>    ::= 
         <table reference> [  NATURAL  ] [ <join type> ]  JOIN <table reference> [ <join specification> ]

<non-join query primary>    ::=   <simple table> | <left paren> <non-join query expression> <right paren>

<query primary>    ::=   <non-join query primary> | <joined table>

<table reference>    ::= 
         <table name> [ <correlation specification> ]
     | <derived table> <correlation specification>
     | <joined table>

<simple table>    ::= 
         <query specification>
     |     <table value constructor>
     |     <explicit table>

<query specification>    ::= 
          SELECT  [ <set quantifier> ] <select list> <table expression>

<table expression>    ::= 
         <from clause>
         [ <where clause> ]
         [ <group by clause> ]
         [ <having clause> ]

<direct select statement: multiple rows> is the rule we will be matching against. We check that

SELECT * FROM p matches <query specification>, <simple table>, <non-join query primary>, <non-join query term>, <non-join query expression>, <query expression>

SELECT * FROM p UNION SELECT * FROM q matches <non-join query expression>

(SELECT * FROM p UNION SELECT * FROM q) matches <non-join query primary>, <non-join query term>, <non-join query expression>, <query expression>

(SELECT * FROM p UNION SELECT * FROM q) UNION SELECT * FROM r now matches <non-join query expression> and <query expression>.

Thus it matches <direct select statement: multiple rows>, so it is a valid SQL-92 statement.

Analogously, SELECT * FROM p UNION (SELECT * FROM q UNION SELECT * FROM r), (SELECT * FROM p), (SELECT * FROM p UNION SELECT * FROM q) and even p CROSS JOIN q are valid SQL-92 select statements.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.