68

I have a base class for my tests which is composed in the following way:

[TestClass]
public abstract class MyBaseTest
{
   protected static string myField = "";

   [ClassInitialize]
   public static void ClassInitialize(TestContext context)
   {
       // static field initialization
       myField = "new value";
   }
}

Now I am trying to create a new test that inherits from the base, with the following signature:

[TestClass]
public class MyTest : MyBaseTest
{
   [TestMethod]
   public void BaseMethod_ShouldHave_FieldInitialized()
   {
       Assert.IsTrue(myField == "new value");
   }
}

The ClassInitialize is never called by the child tests ... What is the real and correct way of using test initialization with inheritance on MsTest?

45
0

Unfortunately you cannot achieve this that way because the ClassInitializeAttribute Class cannot be inherited.

An inherited attribute can be used by the sub-classes of the classes that use it. Since the ClassInitializeAttribute cannot not be inherited, when the MyTest class is initialized the ClassInitialize method from the MyBaseTest class cannot be called.

Try to solve it with another way. A less efficient way is to define again the ClassInitialize method in MyTest and just call the base method instead of duplicating the code.

| improve this answer | |
  • 29
    I tried your approach and it works, but honestly Microsoft should fix this because NUnit doesn't have this behavior. – Raffaeu Apr 12 '13 at 8:25
  • When you say “the ClassInitializeAttribute Class cannot be inherited”, are you referring to the class being sealed?—that should not affect how the attribute appears when applied to an inherited method… – binki May 5 '15 at 13:54
  • 1
    Oh, I just noticed the methods are static which means they don’t participate in normal inheritance. Ahh… – binki May 5 '15 at 14:00
  • 1
    You can upvote this feature in uservoice here – Iman Mahmoudinasab May 23 '15 at 12:32
  • 2
8
0

A potential workaround is to define a new class with AssemblyInitializeAttribute instead. It has a different scope, obviously, but for me it meets my needs (cross-cutting concerns, which just so happen to require exactly the same settings for every test class and test method.)

using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;

namespace MyTests
{
  [TestClass]
  public sealed class TestAssemblyInitialize
  {
    [AssemblyInitialize]
    public static void Initialize(TestContext context)
    {
      ...
    }
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This is what I ended up doing as well, however I am curious; why is your base-test class sealed? Won't that prevent you from inheriting that class and doing exactly what you have set out to do? – Paul Nelson Baker Jul 6 '16 at 21:47
  • I'm not using it for inheritance. All of my real test classes derive from a different base class. This class is purely for the AssemblyInitialize method. It's just a design decision that I made to keep things separated. – Dave Sexton Jul 7 '16 at 23:33
1
0

Use a static constructor on a base class? It's executed only once, by design, and it doesn't have the weird limitation on inheritance, like the ClassInitializeAttribute.

| improve this answer | |
  • This is not a replacement of [ClassInitialize]: It will be called without context when the complete assembly is loaded. So it isn't better than [AssemblyInitialize]! – Marcel Jul 24 '19 at 8:48
0
0

UPDATE: Added lock to avoid multi-threading issues...

We know that a new instance of the class is constructed for every [TestMethod] in the class as it gets run. The parameter-less constructor of the base class will be called each time this happens. Couldn't you simply create a static variable in the base class and test it when constructor runs?

This helps you to not forget to put the initialization code in the sub-class.

Not sure if there's any drawback to this approach...

Like so:

public class TestBase
{
    private static bool _isInitialized = false;
    private object _locker = new object();

    public TestBase()
    {
        lock (_locker) 
        {
          if (!_isInitialized)
          {
            TestClassInitialize();
            _isInitialized = true;
          }
        }
    }

    public void TestClassInitialize()
    {
        // Do one-time init stuff
    }
}
public class SalesOrderTotals_Test : TestBase
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void TotalsCalulateWhenThereIsNoSalesTax()
    {
    }
    [TestMethod]
    public void TotalsCalulateWhenThereIsSalesTax()
    {
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    You don't get the TestContext with this solution. That's a bummer. – Andy V Feb 6 '15 at 16:38
  • Also, you don't have CleanUp – bubi Sep 24 '16 at 9:52
  • And you usually don't need either of those. This is a fine solution for cases when it fits, which is often. – BWhite Nov 2 '18 at 22:41
  • A serious flaw here is thread-safety (or the lack of). Since all the tests will be running in parallel, and they'll all call the constructor at approx. the same time, most of them will enter the TestClassInitialize() method until one of those finally exits that method and sets the _isInitialized to true. – Mladen B. Jun 17 '19 at 15:00
  • static members are entirely specific to the declaring class; subclasses do not get separate copies. – Alex Mar 8 at 10:34
-1
0

For anyone that is just trying to get a basic ClassInit working and ended up here.

Here's an example of what your test class might look like.

using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;

namespace Company.Product.Area
{
    [TestClass]
    public class MyTestSuite : TestInits
    {
        [ClassInitialize]
        public static void MyClassInit(TestContext tc)
        {
            MyInitTestSuite();
        }

        [ClassCleanup]
        public static void MyClassCleanup()
        {
            MyCleanupTestSuite();
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void My_First_Test()
        {
            ...
        }

        public static void MyInitTestSuite()
        {
            // Setup driver
            // Navigate to site
            // Login
        }

        public static void MyCleanupTestSuite()
        {
            // Quit Driver
        }
    }
}

The static methods you end up calling within ClassInitialize and ClassCleanup can be wherever and named whatever.

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