5

Often I will want to render an ActionLink with content from the database (imagine an Id/Name combination) so I will put the following in my view:

        @foreach (var row in Model)
        {
            <li>@Html.ActionLink(row.Name, "Action", "Controller", new { id = row.Id })</li>
        }

However, this throws an exception if the Name is an empty string. Is there any way to prevent this. I would like to override ActionLink, but it is an extension so I cannot override.

Any suggestions?

Edit:

First, I do not control the data, or I would ensure that the Name field is required and always populated. Unfortunately this is not the case.

Second, I realize the user will have nothing to click on, but I believe that rendering an empty link is a better alternative than giving them a YSOD.

1
  • instead of copying all that code (in your answer), i created an extension for HtmlHelper @Html.ActionLinkTranslated("Home", "Index", "Home", new { culture = WebApp.Helpers.CultureHelper.GetCurrentCulture() }, null) When it is called, if "Home" dosent exists in a translation, it returns the input ("Home") Aug 21 '15 at 11:13
10

It turns out that an instance method will always be preferred over an extension method with the same signature.

I was able to load a CustomHtmlHelper and put instance method ActionLink methods in the new class:

public abstract class CustomWebViewPage<T> : WebViewPage<T>
{
    public new CustomHtmlHelper<T> Html { get; set; }

    public override void InitHelpers()
    {
        Ajax = new AjaxHelper<T>(ViewContext, this);
        Url = new UrlHelper(ViewContext.RequestContext);

        //Load Custom Html Helper instead of Default
        Html = new CustomHtmlHelper<T>(ViewContext, this);
    }
}

And the HtmlHelper is as follows (ActionLink methods copied from Reflector without the LinkText error check:

public class CustomHtmlHelper<T> : HtmlHelper<T>
{
    public CustomHtmlHelper(ViewContext viewContext, IViewDataContainer viewDataContainer) :
        base(viewContext, viewDataContainer)
    {
    }

    //Instance methods will always be called instead of extension methods when both exist with the same signature...

    public MvcHtmlString ActionLink(string linkText, string actionName)
    {
        return ActionLink(linkText, actionName, null, new RouteValueDictionary(), new RouteValueDictionary());
    }

    public MvcHtmlString ActionLink(string linkText, string actionName, object routeValues)
    {
        return ActionLink(linkText, actionName, null, new RouteValueDictionary(routeValues), new RouteValueDictionary());
    }

    public MvcHtmlString ActionLink(string linkText, string actionName, string controllerName)
    {
        return ActionLink(linkText, actionName, controllerName, new RouteValueDictionary(), new RouteValueDictionary());
    }

    public MvcHtmlString ActionLink(string linkText, string actionName, RouteValueDictionary routeValues)
    {
        return ActionLink(linkText, actionName, null, routeValues, new RouteValueDictionary());
    }

    public MvcHtmlString ActionLink(string linkText, string actionName, object routeValues, object htmlAttributes)
    {
        return ActionLink(linkText, actionName, null, new RouteValueDictionary(routeValues), AnonymousObjectToHtmlAttributes(htmlAttributes));
    }

    public MvcHtmlString ActionLink(string linkText, string actionName, RouteValueDictionary routeValues, IDictionary<string, object> htmlAttributes)
    {
        return ActionLink(linkText, actionName, null, routeValues, htmlAttributes);
    }

    public MvcHtmlString ActionLink(string linkText, string actionName, string controllerName, object routeValues, object htmlAttributes)
    {
        return ActionLink(linkText, actionName, controllerName, new RouteValueDictionary(routeValues), AnonymousObjectToHtmlAttributes(htmlAttributes));
    }

    public MvcHtmlString ActionLink(string linkText, string actionName, string controllerName, RouteValueDictionary routeValues, IDictionary<string, object> htmlAttributes)
    {
        return MvcHtmlString.Create(GenerateLink(ViewContext.RequestContext, RouteCollection, linkText, null, actionName, controllerName, routeValues, htmlAttributes));
    }

    public MvcHtmlString ActionLink(string linkText, string actionName, string controllerName, string protocol, string hostName, string fragment, object routeValues, object htmlAttributes)
    {
        return ActionLink(linkText, actionName, controllerName, protocol, hostName, fragment, new RouteValueDictionary(routeValues), AnonymousObjectToHtmlAttributes(htmlAttributes));
    }

    public MvcHtmlString ActionLink(string linkText, string actionName, string controllerName, string protocol, string hostName, string fragment, RouteValueDictionary routeValues, IDictionary<string, object> htmlAttributes)
    {
        return MvcHtmlString.Create(GenerateLink(ViewContext.RequestContext, RouteCollection, linkText, null, actionName, controllerName, protocol, hostName, fragment, routeValues, htmlAttributes));
    }
}

And finally, setting the pageBaseType int the Views/Web.config file to use the new custom WebViewPage:

  <system.web.webPages.razor>
    ...
    <pages pageBaseType="Fully.Qualified.Namespace.CustomWebViewPage">
    ...
    </pages>
  </system.web.webPages.razor>

Hope this helps someone else.

3
  • You are still going to have links that can't be clicked if you don't replace that null string with something. Just FYI.
    – Tommy
    Apr 11 '13 at 15:35
  • Well aware! Thanks though :) Apr 11 '13 at 15:35
  • But when i'm try add for example <pages pageBaseType="Business.Mvc.CustomWebViewPage"> he is write incorect_type_paramiter_number
    – AleksP
    Feb 9 '15 at 18:05
4

The issue you are going to have is if the name is blank, there is nothing to click on for the user in the UI. Example: <a href="someUrl"></a> gives no clickable object.

What may be better is if you could provide a default "No Name" string to those rows that have an empty string.

@foreach (var row in Model)
        {
            <li>@Html.ActionLink(string.isNullOrEmpty(row.Name) ? "No Name" : row.Name, "Action", "Controller", new { id = row.Id })</li>
        }

EDIT

If you do not want to put a condition in every @Html.ActionLink, you can create your own @Html.Helper

 public static IHtmlString ActionLinkCheckNull(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper, string linkText, string action, string controller, object routeValues, object htmlAttributes)
        {
            var urlHelper = new UrlHelper(htmlHelper.ViewContext.RequestContext);
            var anchor = new TagBuilder("a") { InnerHtml = string.IsNullOrEmpty(linkText) ? "No Name", linktext };
            anchor.Attributes["href"] = urlHelper.Action(action, controller, routeValues);
            anchor.MergeAttributes(new RouteValueDictionary(htmlAttributes));
            return MvcHtmlString.Create(anchor.ToString());
        }

Then in your Views folder web.config, add a reference to the namespace that you place this extension so you don't have to have a using statement at the top of every view. Example:

<add namespace="Core.Extensions"/>

Then in your views, use

 @Html.ActionLinkCheckNull(row.Name, "Action", "Controller", new { id = row.Id })
8
  • Yes, I would prefer for the data to not have a empty link, but should it throw an exception and stop the whole page from loading? I was hoping for an elegant workaround that would not involve tacking a failsafe into every ActionLink Apr 11 '13 at 15:11
  • @MattMurrell - take a look at the explanation provided by Michael below on why its throwing out exceptions :)
    – Tommy
    Apr 11 '13 at 15:13
  • Agreed. Michael correctly states that it is not required to have a value and Microsoft included it as a "feature." I even agree that the feature should often be on by default, it's probably a good idea. I am just looking for a way to turn off said "feature" in my specific case. Apr 11 '13 at 15:16
  • @MattMurrell, the problem is that they use the linkText to build the actual text of the link. It wouldn't have any text and the user wouldn't be able to see anything. That's why they protected it. Apr 11 '13 at 15:18
  • 1
    @MattMurrell, looks like Tommy and I had the same idea. :D Apr 11 '13 at 15:30
0

To further concrete what Tommy is saying, I wanted to include the ultimately called method that's being protected:

private static string GenerateLinkInternal(RequestContext requestContext, RouteCollection routeCollection, string linkText, string routeName, string actionName, string controllerName, string protocol, string hostName, string fragment, RouteValueDictionary routeValues, IDictionary<string, object> htmlAttributes, bool includeImplicitMvcValues)
{
    string value = UrlHelper.GenerateUrl(routeName, actionName, controllerName, protocol, hostName, fragment, routeValues, routeCollection, requestContext, includeImplicitMvcValues);
    TagBuilder tagBuilder = new TagBuilder("a")
    {
        InnerHtml = (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(linkText)) ? HttpUtility.HtmlEncode(linkText) : string.Empty
    };
    tagBuilder.MergeAttributes<string, object>(htmlAttributes);
    tagBuilder.MergeAttribute("href", value);
    return tagBuilder.ToString(TagRenderMode.Normal);
}

so, since you're building a link, the outer method is throwing an exception because it wouldn't have any text to show on the screen. That code is shown below:

public static MvcHtmlString ActionLink(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper, string linkText, string actionName, string controllerName, RouteValueDictionary routeValues, IDictionary<string, object> htmlAttributes)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(linkText))
    {
        throw new ArgumentException(MvcResources.Common_NullOrEmpty, "linkText");
    }
    return MvcHtmlString.Create(HtmlHelper.GenerateLink(htmlHelper.ViewContext.RequestContext, htmlHelper.RouteCollection, linkText, null, actionName, controllerName, routeValues, htmlAttributes));
}

technically speaking that code doesn't have to be protected but it is as a feature.


Here is a workaround for you, but you'll need to build your own ActionLink extension method like this and place it in a code file somewhere in the project:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Web.Mvc.Resources;
using System.Web.Routing;
namespace System.Web.Mvc.Html
{
    public static class MyLinkExtensions
    {
        public static MvcHtmlString ActionLink(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper, string linkText, string actionName, string controllerName, int identifier)
        {
            return htmlHelper.ActionLink(string.IsNullOrEmpty(linkText) ? "some default text" : linkText, actionName, controllerName, new { id = identifier });
        }
    }
}

and so now your markup looks like this:

@foreach (var row in Model)
{
    <li>@Html.ActionLink(row.Name, "Action", "Controller", row.Id)</li>
}

and you have encapsulated the turnary to determine the state of the linkText and yet still render your links in a single line.

0

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