6

Suppose you have developers A, B, C, D, E, F and they review each other's work.

How can you develop an algorithm to generate a review rotation telling each developer whose work they have to review each week AND satisfy these criteria:

  • You cannot review the same person two weeks in a row
  • There cannot be closed loops (A reviews B, B reviews A)
  • It would be nice if you review each other developer once before you start repeating.

I think I can make it work with an odd number of developers, but I am struggling with an even number.

5
  • 1
    Use ROT13 as inspiration. Or rather, ROT1, ROT2, ...
    – blubb
    Apr 11 '13 at 16:03
  • And to add randomization to it, use ROT on a randomly ordered initial set (i.e. instead of ABCDEF use some permutation of it as the intial set).
    – G. Bach
    Apr 11 '13 at 16:45
  • @G.Bach what benefit does randomization bring to the algorithm? Apr 11 '13 at 17:33
  • 1
    @GavinMiller Nothing that was requested by mdobrinin, but if they don't want to review in cycles, they can use that.
    – G. Bach
    Apr 11 '13 at 18:43
  • 1
    I am not so sure that ROT13 will satisfy the property that there can be no closed loops. See Gavin Miller's answer, which essentially ROT1, which does not work.
    – mvd
    Apr 11 '13 at 19:47
1

There is simple round-robin tournament algorithm to get all possible pairs without repetitions.

Arrange developers in two columns, left column reviews right one.
Fix A place
Move all others in cyclic way.

A->F
B->E 
C->D

A->B
C->F 
D->E

A->C
D->B 
E->F

A->D
E->C 
F->B

A->E
F->D 
B->C
2
  • A->F means A reviews F and F reviews A? That is a violation of the requirement.
    – mvd
    Apr 12 '13 at 14:46
  • @mdobrinin No, we can use rotated (cyclic) right column as reviewers of left column
    – MBo
    Apr 12 '13 at 16:15
1

I'd go the nieve route and rotate through a circular array. So week 1 everyone reviews the person to their right + 0. Week 2 everyone reviews the person to their right + 1. Week 3, right + 2, etc.

Week 1:
  A -> B
  B -> C
  ...
  F -> A
Week 2:
  A -> C
  B -> D
  ...
  F -> B
2
  • 2
    This in fact does NOT work. See Week 3: A reviews D, D reviews A.
    – mvd
    Apr 11 '13 at 19:44
  • @mdobrinin: However, this scheme can easily be fixed if you're willing to drop one of your requirements (see my answer).
    – blubb
    Apr 12 '13 at 8:05
1

I seem to have found a solution inspired by the Round Robin rotation.

For Developers A, B, C, D, E, F

You fix a developer, say A. Then rotate the rest in a clockwise manner.

Then:

  • Everyone on the top row reviews the person below them
  • Everyone on the bottom row review the person above and to the right diagonally of them

Week 1:

A B C
D E F

AD
BE
CF
DB
EC
FA

Week 2:

A D B
E F C

AE
DF
BC
ED
FB
CA

Week 3:

A E D
F C B

AF
EC
DB
FE
CD
BA

Week 4:

A F E
C B D

AC
FB
ED
CF
BE
DA

Week 5:

A C F
B D E

AB
CD
FE
BC
DF
EA

Although it still exhibits unwanted properties where some people will never meet others such as B avoiding D.

1

Here's a brute-force in Haskell (takes about 10 seconds to get going).

Code:

import Control.Monad (guard, replicateM)

developers = ["A", "B", "C", "D", "E", "F"]

combinations = filter (\x -> head x /= last x) . replicateM 2 $ developers

makeWeek week =
  if length week == length developers
     then [week]
     else do
       review <- combinations
       guard (notElem (take 1 review) (map (take 1) week)
              && notElem (drop 1 review) (map (drop 1) week)
              && notElem (reverse review) week
              && notElem review week)
       makeWeek (review:week)

solve = solve' [] where
  solve' weeks =
    if length weeks == length developers - 1
       then [weeks]
       else do
         week' <- makeWeek []
         guard (all (\x -> notElem x (concat . take (length developers - 1) $ weeks)) week')
         solve' (week':weeks)   

Sample Output:

*Main> solve
[[[["F","B"],["E","A"],["D","C"],["C","E"],["B","D"],["A","F"]]
 ,[["F","C"],["E","B"],["D","A"],["C","D"],["B","F"],["A","E"]]
 ,[["F","A"],["E","C"],["D","B"],["C","F"],["B","E"],["A","D"]]
 ,[["F","E"],["E","D"],["D","F"],["C","B"],["B","A"],["A","C"]]
 ,[["F","D"],["E","F"],["D","E"],["C","A"],["B","C"],["A","B"]]],...etc
3
  • A developer will review the same person for the whole week. What I meant is that at the same time, the person you are reviewing cannot be reviewing you.
    – mvd
    Apr 12 '13 at 1:24
  • So does the output sample provide what you asked for? (It is just the first of a stream of five-week lists.) In five weeks: no reviews of the same person two weeks in a row, no closed loops, and each developer is reviewed once. Apr 12 '13 at 2:06
  • The output does, but I was more looking for a simple algorithm than a brute force program. This is a not a theoretical problem and so the solution must be easy for a person to replicate!
    – mvd
    Apr 12 '13 at 14:48
0

I will assume that by closed loops, you refer to cycles of length exactly 2. That is, it is allowed that A reviews B, B reviews C and C reviews A.

Let n be the number of people, and let 0, ..., n-1 be their names.

Week 1: Person i reviews the code of person (i + 1) % n.

Week 2: Person i reviews the code of person (i + 2) % n.

...

Week n/2: Person i cannot review the code of person (i + n/2) % n, since this would cause a closed loop. Therefore, person i instead reviews the code of person (i + n/2 + 1) % n.

Week n/2 + 1: Person i reviews the code of person (i + n/2 + 2) % n.

...

Week n - 1: Person i reviews the code of person (i + 1) % n again, everything starts over.

Note: your last (optional) requirement (each person reviews every other person before the cycle starts again) is violated. For n = 2 and n = 4, no solution exists that satisfy all requirements anyway. The base case n = 2 is trivial. Consider the case n = 4: If you want to avoid closed loops, at least one person has to review the same person twice in a row. (Just enumerate all possible review relationships to see this).

If you really need your last requirement, you'll have to go with @groovy's solution. I'll leave mine here since it's very easy to compute.

2
  • This seems to be the same as Gavin Miller's answer in that you just skip the offending weeks.
    – mvd
    Apr 12 '13 at 15:26
  • @mdobrinin: Indeed. I wrote a seperate answer because I wanted to make the assumptions explicit and show the tradeoff between taking/leaving the optional requirement.
    – blubb
    Apr 12 '13 at 16:16

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