5

In Awk, the range pattern is not an expression, so canot use the "!" to not it. so how to implement it (Printing all contents EXCEPT matching range pattern using awk)?

e.g.

$cat 1.t

abd
hfdh
#  
fafa
deafa
123 
#
end

the result I wanted:

cat 1.t

abd
hfdh
end

EDIT:

I gave an impertinent example. the endpattern should be different with the startpattern because I just have not test this. That's My fault.

At the same time, I want to operate the range pattern and the not range pattern differently. So sed is not my choice.

1
  • 2
    +1 for your tricky example text!
    – Kent
    Apr 11, 2013 at 17:32

3 Answers 3

7

you just gave a tricky (I don't know I should call it good or bad ^_^ ) example. Your text have exactly same startpattern and endpattern (#)

I guess you are looking for the same way as sed '/#/,/#/d' or sed -n '/#/,/#/!p'

There is some similiar (not same as sed's) address model in awk. In man page there is explanation. I said not same, your example is good one. if start == end the address model for awk won't work:

kent$  echo "abd
hfdh
#  
fafa
deafa
123 
#
end"|awk '/#/,/#/{next}1'                                                                                                                                                   
abd
hfdh
fafa
deafa
123 
end

because awk matches the same line (again check man page) but if they are different, see this example:

kent$  echo "abd
hfdh
#  
fafa
deafa
123 
##
end"|awk '/#/,/##/{next}1'
abd
hfdh
end

it will give what you want. so if this is the case, you could just do:

awk '/start/,/end/{next}1'

yes, quite similar as sed's one.

If the start and end are really same, you want to do it with awk, you need flag.

kent$  echo "abd
hfdh
#  
fafa
deafa
123 
#
end"|awk '/#/&&!f{f=1;next}f&&/#/{f=0;next}!f'
abd
hfdh
end

well, in example better use ^#$, but that is not the point. I hope this answers your question.

1
  • awk '/start/,/end/{next}1' correct and detailed answer for my question, though I havenot explain it clearly using this awkward example! Apr 12, 2013 at 4:18
1

Is sed an alternative?

$ sed '/#/,/#/d' input
abd
hfdh
end
1

If you really need to use awk, something like this should work:

awk 'BEGIN{x=1} /startpattern/{x=0} /endpattern/{x=1;next} x{print}'

Although the sed alternative might be a simpler approach (it's less typing, at least).

Edit: @Kent pointed out you have the same start and end pattern, which makes it a bit more tricky, but this should work:

awk 'BEGIN{x=1} /pattern/{x=!x;next} x{print}'

That basically toggles x every time it sees the pattern, and only prints when x!=0. The next in there avoids printing the pattern when it's turning printing back on.

2
  • this won't work for OP's example, it has same start and end patterns. You need check the x not only for printing, but also for setting x itself.
    – Kent
    Apr 11, 2013 at 17:32
  • @Kent good catch... edited in an alternative version that takes that into account.
    – twalberg
    Apr 11, 2013 at 18:17

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.