88

I'm looking for a built-in function/extended function in T-SQL for string manipulation similar to the String.Format method in .NET.

13 Answers 13

68

If you are using SQL Server 2012 and above, you can use FORMATMESSAGE. eg.

DECLARE @s NVARCHAR(50) = 'World';
DECLARE @d INT = 123;
SELECT FORMATMESSAGE('Hello %s, %d', @s, @d)
-- RETURNS 'Hello World, 123'

More examples from MSDN: FORMATMESSAGE

SELECT FORMATMESSAGE('Signed int %i, %d %i, %d, %+i, %+d, %+i, %+d', 5, -5, 50, -50, -11, -11, 11, 11);
SELECT FORMATMESSAGE('Signed int with leading zero %020i', 5);
SELECT FORMATMESSAGE('Signed int with leading zero 0 %020i', -55);
SELECT FORMATMESSAGE('Unsigned int %u, %u', 50, -50);
SELECT FORMATMESSAGE('Unsigned octal %o, %o', 50, -50);
SELECT FORMATMESSAGE('Unsigned hexadecimal %x, %X, %X, %X, %x', 11, 11, -11, 50, -50);
SELECT FORMATMESSAGE('Unsigned octal with prefix: %#o, %#o', 50, -50);
SELECT FORMATMESSAGE('Unsigned hexadecimal with prefix: %#x, %#X, %#X, %X, %x', 11, 11, -11, 50, -50);
SELECT FORMATMESSAGE('Hello %s!', 'TEST');
SELECT FORMATMESSAGE('Hello %20s!', 'TEST');
SELECT FORMATMESSAGE('Hello %-20s!', 'TEST');
SELECT FORMATMESSAGE('Hello %20s!', 'TEST');

NOTES:

  • Undocumented in 2012
  • Limited to 2044 characters
  • To escape the % sign, you need to double it.
  • If you are logging errors in extended events, calling FORMATMESSAGE comes up as a (harmless) error
  • 1
    If you are using SQL 2012, you can use the FORMAT function without all the above complication :) – Reversed Engineer Jun 17 '15 at 11:35
  • 1
    This should have way more votes! Awesome find always avoided because assumed it would only work with built-in msg_number. – Lankymart Jan 8 '16 at 10:11
  • 1
    The documentation for 2012 shows only a msgid is supported on this function; 2014 is the first version that indicates a string may be supplied – Jason Musgrove Feb 29 '16 at 16:33
  • 1
    Any specific reason why SELECT FORMATMESSAGE('viw_system_%entity_%master_childattributes', @entity, @master) does not work. – bijayk Aug 30 '16 at 19:26
  • 3
    @bijayk it only accepts specific placeholder names, eg, %s for strings, %i for ints. – g2server Aug 31 '16 at 1:33
53

take a look at xp_sprintf. example below.

DECLARE @ret_string varchar (255)
EXEC xp_sprintf @ret_string OUTPUT, 
    'INSERT INTO %s VALUES (%s, %s)', 'table1', '1', '2'
PRINT @ret_string

Result looks like this:

INSERT INTO table1 VALUES (1, 2)

Just found an issue with the max size (255 char limit) of the string with this so there is an alternative function you can use:

create function dbo.fnSprintf (@s varchar(MAX), 
                @params varchar(MAX), @separator char(1) = ',')
returns varchar(MAX)
as
begin
declare @p varchar(MAX)
declare @paramlen int

set @params = @params + @separator
set @paramlen = len(@params)
while not @params = ''
begin
    set @p = left(@params+@separator, charindex(@separator, @params)-1)
    set @s = STUFF(@s, charindex('%s', @s), 2, @p)
    set @params = substring(@params, len(@p)+2, @paramlen)
end
return @s
end

To get the same result as above you call the function as follows:

print dbo.fnSprintf('INSERT INTO %s VALUES (%s, %s)', 'table1,1,2', default)
  • 7
    Just an FYI if any of your params contains a comma then you are out of luck. If you happen to pass one by accident your going to have some troubles figuring out what went wrong. – Kyle Aug 7 '12 at 12:18
15

I have created a user defined function to mimic the string.format functionality. You can use it.

stringformat-in-sql

  • I like this solution since I have reservations against using xp_ functions/SPs in production. I used your code as a base and allowed for the passing in of the delimiter, which eliminates any concern about commas being used in the data. – Tim Friesen Oct 1 '12 at 15:09
4

There is a way, but it has its limitations. You can use the FORMATMESSAGE() function. It allows you to format a string using formatting similar to the printf() function in C.

However, the biggest limitation is that it will only work with messages in the sys.messages table. Here's an article about it: microsoft_library_ms186788

It's kind of a shame there isn't an easier way to do this, because there are times when you want to format a string/varchar in the database. Hopefully you are only looking to format a string in a standard way and can use the sys.messages table.

Coincidentally, you could also use the RAISERROR() function with a very low severity, the documentation for raiseerror even mentions doing this, but the results are only printed. So you wouldn't be able to do anything with the resulting value (from what I understand).

Good luck!

  • 1
    Understand this is an old answer but assumption about FORMATMESSAGE() is incorrect, however understandable because it is undocumented but it will accept any string as a first parameter, see this answer by @g2server. – Lankymart Jan 8 '16 at 10:15
  • @Lankymart You are correct - this is an old answer. The ability to accept a string wasn't added until SQL 2012. – jj. Feb 3 '16 at 19:08
3

Raw t-sql is limited to CHARINDEX(), PATINDEX(), REPLACE(), and SUBSTRING() for string manipulation. But with sql server 2005 and later you can set up user defined functions that run in .Net, which means setting up a string.format() UDF shouldn't be too tough.

2

One more idea.

Although this is not a universal solution - it is simple and works, at least for me :)

For one placeholder {0}:

create function dbo.Format1
(
    @String  nvarchar(4000),
    @Param0  sql_variant
)
returns nvarchar(4000)
as
begin
    declare @Null nvarchar(4) = N'NULL';

    return replace(@String, N'{0}', cast(isnull(@Param0, @Null) as nvarchar(4000)));    
end

For two placeholders {0} and {1}:

create function dbo.Format2
(
    @String  nvarchar(4000),
    @Param0  sql_variant,
    @Param1  sql_variant
)
returns nvarchar(4000)
as
begin
    declare @Null nvarchar(4) = N'NULL';

    set @String = replace(@String, N'{0}', cast(isnull(@Param0, @Null) as nvarchar(4000)));
       return     replace(@String, N'{1}', cast(isnull(@Param1, @Null) as nvarchar(4000))); 
end

For three placeholders {0}, {1} and {2}:

create function dbo.Format3
(
    @String  nvarchar(4000),
    @Param0  sql_variant,
    @Param1  sql_variant,
    @Param2  sql_variant
)
returns nvarchar(4000)
as
begin
    declare @Null nvarchar(4) = N'NULL';

    set @String = replace(@String, N'{0}', cast(isnull(@Param0, @Null) as nvarchar(4000)));
    set @String = replace(@String, N'{1}', cast(isnull(@Param1, @Null) as nvarchar(4000))); 
       return     replace(@String, N'{2}', cast(isnull(@Param2, @Null) as nvarchar(4000)));
end

and so on...

Such an approach allows us to use these functions in SELECT statement and with parameters of nvarchar, number, bit and datetime datatypes.

For example:

declare @Param0 nvarchar(10) = N'IPSUM' ,
        @Param1 int          = 1234567  ,
        @Param2 datetime2(0) = getdate();

select dbo.Format3(N'Lorem {0} dolor, {1} elit at {2}', @Param0, @Param1, @Param2);  
1

I think there is small correction while calculating end position.

Here is correct function

**>>**IF OBJECT_ID( N'[dbo].[FormatString]', 'FN' ) IS NOT NULL
DROP FUNCTION [dbo].[FormatString]
GO
/***************************************************
Object Name : FormatString
Purpose : Returns the formatted string.
Original Author : Karthik D V http://stringformat-in-sql.blogspot.com/
Sample Call:
SELECT dbo.FormatString ( N'Format {0} {1} {2} {0}', N'1,2,3' )
*******************************************/
CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[FormatString](
    @Format NVARCHAR(4000) ,
    @Parameters NVARCHAR(4000)
)
RETURNS NVARCHAR(4000)
AS
BEGIN
    --DECLARE @Format NVARCHAR(4000), @Parameters NVARCHAR(4000) select @format='{0}{1}', @Parameters='hello,world'
    DECLARE @Message NVARCHAR(400), @Delimiter CHAR(1)
    DECLARE @ParamTable TABLE ( ID INT IDENTITY(0,1), Parameter VARCHAR(1000) )
    Declare @startPos int, @endPos int
    SELECT @Message = @Format, @Delimiter = ','**>>**

    --handle first parameter
     set @endPos=CHARINDEX(@Delimiter,@Parameters)
    if (@endPos=0 and @Parameters is not null) --there is only one parameter
        insert into @ParamTable (Parameter) values(@Parameters)
    else begin
        insert into @ParamTable (Parameter) select substring(@Parameters,0,@endPos)
    end

    while @endPos>0
    Begin
        --insert a row for each parameter in the 
        set @startPos = @endPos + LEN(@Delimiter)
        set @endPos = CHARINDEX(@Delimiter,@Parameters, @startPos)
        if (@endPos>0)
            insert into @ParamTable (Parameter) 
                select substring(@Parameters,@startPos,@endPos - @startPos)
            else
                insert into @ParamTable (Parameter) 
                select substring(@Parameters,@startPos,4000)            
    End

    UPDATE @ParamTable SET @Message = 
        REPLACE ( @Message, '{'+CONVERT(VARCHAR,ID) + '}', Parameter )
    RETURN @Message
END
Go
grant execute,references on dbo.formatString to public 
1

Here is my version. Can be extended to accommodate more number of parameters and can extend formatting based on type. Currently only date and datetime types are formatted.

Example:

select dbo.FormatString('some string %s some int %s date %s','"abcd"',100,cast(getdate() as date),DEFAULT,DEFAULT)
select dbo.FormatString('some string %s some int %s date time %s','"abcd"',100,getdate(),DEFAULT,DEFAULT)

Output:

some string "abcd" some int 100 date 29-Apr-2017
some string "abcd" some int 100 date time 29-Apr-2017 19:40

Functions:

create function dbo.FormatValue(@param sql_variant)
returns nvarchar(100)
begin
/*
Tejasvi Hegde, 29-April-2017
Can extend formatting here.
*/
    declare @result nvarchar(100)

    if (SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY(@param,'BaseType') in ('date'))
    begin
       select @result = REPLACE(CONVERT(CHAR(11), @param, 106), ' ', '-')
    end
    else  if (SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY(@param,'BaseType') in ('datetime','datetime2'))
    begin
       select @result = REPLACE(CONVERT(CHAR(11), @param, 106), ' ', '-')+' '+CONVERT(VARCHAR(5),@param,108)
    end
    else
    begin
       select @result = cast(@param as nvarchar(100))
    end
    return @result

/*
BaseType:
bigint
binary
char
date
datetime
datetime2
datetimeoffset
decimal
float
int
money
nchar
numeric
nvarchar
real
smalldatetime
smallint
smallmoney
time
tinyint
uniqueidentifier
varbinary
varchar
*/   

end;


create function dbo.FormatString(
    @format nvarchar(4000)
    ,@param1 sql_variant = null
    ,@param2 sql_variant = null
    ,@param3 sql_variant = null
    ,@param4 sql_variant = null
    ,@param5 sql_variant = null
    )
returns nvarchar(4000)
begin
/*
Tejasvi Hegde, 29-April-2017

select dbo.FormatString('some string value %s some int %s date %s','"abcd"',100,cast(getdate() as date),DEFAULT,DEFAULT)
select dbo.FormatString('some string value %s some int %s date time %s','"abcd"',100,getdate(),DEFAULT,DEFAULT)
*/

    declare @result nvarchar(4000)

    select @param1 = dbo.formatValue(@param1)
    ,@param2 = dbo.formatValue(@param2)
    ,@param3 = dbo.formatValue(@param3)
    ,@param4 = dbo.formatValue(@param4)
    ,@param5 = dbo.formatValue(@param5)

    select @param2 = cast(@param2 as nvarchar)
    EXEC xp_sprintf @result OUTPUT,@format , @param1, @param2, @param3, @param4, @param5

    return @result

end;
0

here's what I found with my experiments using the built-in

FORMATMESSAGE() function

sp_addmessage @msgnum=50001,@severity=1,@msgText='Hello %s you are #%d',@replace='replace'
SELECT FORMATMESSAGE(50001, 'Table1', 5)

when you call up sp_addmessage, your message template gets stored into the system table master.dbo.sysmessages (verified on SQLServer 2000).

You must manage addition and removal of template strings from the table yourself, which is awkward if all you really want is output a quick message to the results screen.

The solution provided by Kathik DV, looks interesting but doesn't work with SQL Server 2000, so i altered it a bit, and this version should work with all versions of SQL Server:

IF OBJECT_ID( N'[dbo].[FormatString]', 'FN' ) IS NOT NULL
    DROP FUNCTION [dbo].[FormatString]
GO
/***************************************************
Object Name : FormatString
Purpose : Returns the formatted string.
Original Author : Karthik D V http://stringformat-in-sql.blogspot.com/
Sample Call:
SELECT dbo.FormatString ( N'Format {0} {1} {2} {0}', N'1,2,3' )
*******************************************/
CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[FormatString](
@Format NVARCHAR(4000) ,
@Parameters NVARCHAR(4000)
)
RETURNS NVARCHAR(4000)
AS
BEGIN
    --DECLARE @Format NVARCHAR(4000), @Parameters NVARCHAR(4000) select @format='{0}{1}', @Parameters='hello,world'
    DECLARE @Message NVARCHAR(400), @Delimiter CHAR(1)
    DECLARE @ParamTable TABLE ( ID INT IDENTITY(0,1), Parameter VARCHAR(1000) )
    Declare @startPos int, @endPos int
    SELECT @Message = @Format, @Delimiter = ','

    --handle first parameter
     set @endPos=CHARINDEX(@Delimiter,@Parameters)
    if (@endPos=0 and @Parameters is not null) --there is only one parameter
        insert into @ParamTable (Parameter) values(@Parameters)
    else begin
        insert into @ParamTable (Parameter) select substring(@Parameters,0,@endPos)
    end

    while @endPos>0
    Begin
        --insert a row for each parameter in the 
        set @startPos = @endPos + LEN(@Delimiter)
        set @endPos = CHARINDEX(@Delimiter,@Parameters, @startPos)
        if (@endPos>0)
            insert into @ParamTable (Parameter) select substring(@Parameters,@startPos,@endPos)
        else
            insert into @ParamTable (Parameter) select substring(@Parameters,@startPos,4000)            
    End

    UPDATE @ParamTable SET @Message = REPLACE ( @Message, '{'+CONVERT(VARCHAR,ID) + '}', Parameter )
    RETURN @Message
END
Go
    grant execute,references on dbo.formatString to public

Usage:

print dbo.formatString('hello {0}... you are {1}','world,good')
--result: hello world... you are good
0

At the moment this doesn't really exist (although you can of course write your own). There is an open connect bug for it: https://connect.microsoft.com/SQLServer/Feedback/Details/3130221, which as of this writing has just 1 vote.

0

Actually there is no built in function similar to string.Format function of .NET is available in SQL server.

There is a function FORMATMESSAGE() in SQL server but it mimics to printf() function of C not string.Format function of .NET.

SELECT FORMATMESSAGE('This is the %s and this is the %s.', 'first variable', 'second variable') AS Result
-1

Not exactly, but I would check out some of the articles on string handling (amongst other things) by "Phil Factor" (geddit?) on Simple Talk.

-3

this is bad approach. you should work with assembly dll's, in which will do the same for you with better performance.

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