1

The following code will create a transparent bitmap and then draw a white ellipse on it with anti-aliasing.

using(var background = new Bitmap(500, 500))
using (var graphics = Graphics.FromImage(background))
{
    graphics.SmoothingMode = SmoothingMode.AntiAlias;

    graphics.Clear(Color.Transparent);

    graphics.DrawEllipse(new Pen(Color.White, 50), 250, 250, 150, 150);

    background.Save("test.png", ImageFormat.Png);
 }

The bug I have found is that the anti-aliased pixels around the edge of the ellipse have an unexpected color. They have RGB values of (254,254,254) instead of (255,255,255). Since GDI+ defines transparent as ARGB (0,255,255,255) and white as (255,255,255,255) why am i seeing 254 after blending?

4
  • I imagine its a precision issue...whats the backgrounds colour?
    – Sayse
    Apr 11, 2013 at 19:05
  • The backgrounds color is Color.Transparent ARGB (0,255,255,255). So I'm not sure where the precision is getting lost.
    – Zach
    Apr 11, 2013 at 19:25
  • Foreground colours contributing to a particular pixel are mixed together according to their sub-pixel foreground coverage, ignoring contribution from the background. w3.org/Conferences/WWW4/Papers/53/gq-trans.html
    – Sayse
    Apr 11, 2013 at 19:41
  • You are asking GDI+ to do something impossible: rendering anti-aliased pixels that will blend against any background. This cannot work by design, the image edge only looks good if the background color matches the blended-to color. Best to just not try, use SmoothingMode.None and you'll get a pure white edge. Apr 12, 2013 at 11:02

1 Answer 1

0

I had the same problem when I generated PNGs from SVGs in Mono (Mac OS X), but for some reason not on Windows.

To fix this i copied the nearest rgb values from the figure to the antialias-pixels, but keept the antialias-alpha value.

The code is based on the example from: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms229672(v=vs.90).aspx

Code to run as last step before the save method:

var pxf = PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb;
var rect = new Rectangle(0, 0, image.Width, image.Height);
BitmapData bmpData = image.LockBits(rect, ImageLockMode.ReadWrite, pxf);

IntPtr ptr = bmpData.Scan0;

int numBytes = image.Width * image.Height * 4;
byte[] rgbValues = new byte[numBytes];
Marshal.Copy(ptr, rgbValues, 0, numBytes);

for (int argb = 0; argb < rgbValues.Length; argb += 4) {
    var a = rgbValues [argb + 3]; //A
    if(a > 0x00 && a < 0xFF) { //Antialiasing:
        //Scan for neares solid with 0 transparency:
        for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) { //3 pixels scan seems to be enough

            var right = argb + i * 4;
            var left = argb - i * 4;
            var up = argb - i * image.Width * 4;
            var down = argb + i * image.Width * 4;

            if (right < rgbValues.Length && rgbValues [right + 3] == 0xFF) {
                rgbValues [argb+2] = rgbValues [right + 2]; //R
                rgbValues [argb+1] = rgbValues [right + 1]; //G
                rgbValues [argb] = rgbValues [right];       //B
                break;
            } else if (left > 0 && rgbValues [left + 3] == 0xFF) {
                rgbValues [argb+2] = rgbValues [left + 2];
                rgbValues [argb+1] = rgbValues [left + 1];
                rgbValues [argb] = rgbValues [left];
                break;
            } else if (up > 0 && rgbValues [up + 3] == 0xFF) {
                rgbValues [argb+2] = rgbValues [up + 2];
                rgbValues [argb+1] = rgbValues [up + 1];
                rgbValues [argb] = rgbValues [up];
                break;
            } else if (down < rgbValues.Length && rgbValues [down + 3] == 0xFF) {
                rgbValues [argb+2] = rgbValues [down + 2];
                rgbValues [argb+1] = rgbValues [down + 1];
                rgbValues [argb] = rgbValues [down];
                break;
            }
        }
        //rgbValues [argb+3] = a; //Keep old alpha.
    }
}

Marshal.Copy(rgbValues, 0, ptr, numBytes);

image.UnlockBits(bmpData);

`

1
  • The code will also need 4 more directions, upleft, upright, downleft and downright. This is easy to implement.
    – oddbear
    Feb 5, 2016 at 10:22

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.