109

I have a data.frame containing some columns with all NA values. How can I delete them from the data.frame?

Can I use the function,

na.omit(...) 

specifying some additional arguments?

5

9 Answers 9

152

One way of doing it:

df[, colSums(is.na(df)) != nrow(df)]

If the count of NAs in a column is equal to the number of rows, it must be entirely NA.

Or similarly

df[colSums(!is.na(df)) > 0]
5
  • 1
    How can I delete columns having more than a threshold of NA? or in Percentage (lets say above 50%)?
    – discipulus
    Mar 9, 2015 at 7:01
  • 3
    @lovedynasty Probably best to submit a separate question, assuming you haven't already since posting your comment. But anyway, you can always do something like df[, colSums(is.na(df)) < nrow(df) * 0.5] i.e. only keep columns with at least 50% non-blanks. Apr 13, 2015 at 11:31
  • 2
    People working with a correlation matrix must use df[, colSums(is.na(df)) != nrow(df) - 1] since the diagonal is always 1
    – Boern
    Oct 1, 2015 at 12:54
  • 12
    Can use this with the dplyr (version 0.5.0) select_if function as well. df %>% select_if(colSums(!is.na(.)) > 0) Nov 29, 2016 at 21:58
  • @MadScone it is giving me syntax error at "," for df[, colSums(is.na(df)) != nrow(df)] and syntax error at "!" in df[colSums(!is.na(df)) > 0]. Am i missing something
    – Scorpy
    Jan 29, 2020 at 12:58
98

Here is a dplyr solution:

df %>% select_if(~sum(!is.na(.)) > 0)

Update: The summarise_if() function is superseded as of dplyr 1.0. Here are two other solutions that use the where() tidyselect function:

df %>% 
  select(
    where(
      ~sum(!is.na(.x)) > 0
    )
  )
df %>% 
  select(
    where(
      ~!all(is.na(.x))
    )
  )
4
  • 4
    At ~15k rows and ~5k columns, this is truly taking forever. Dec 12, 2017 at 14:58
  • @EngrStudent Was it faster with the accepted answer's solution?
    – johnny
    May 4, 2020 at 16:59
  • 1
    It's been a number of years. I don't remember. DJV has a nice timing post below. May 5, 2020 at 11:20
  • 3
    Here is the same answer on one line (more practical for copy-paste): dplyr::select(dplyr::where(~sum(!is.na(.x)) > 0))
    – Mikko
    Oct 13, 2022 at 8:20
41

Another option is the janitor package:

df <- janitor::remove_empty(df, which = "cols")

https://github.com/sfirke/janitor

3
  • 25
    janitor::remove_empty_cols() is deprecated - use df <- janitor::remove_empty(df, which = "cols")
    – André.B
    May 14, 2019 at 21:45
  • even remove_empty() works
    – Amit Kohli
    Mar 23, 2022 at 15:04
  • I prefer this answer with @André.B's comment as the method in the selected answer above renames the columns to V1, V2, etc., but this method keeps the names of the columns as they are. Aug 15, 2022 at 15:08
28

It seeems like you want to remove ONLY columns with ALL NAs, leaving columns with some rows that do have NAs. I would do this (but I am sure there is an efficient vectorised soution:

#set seed for reproducibility
set.seed <- 103
df <- data.frame( id = 1:10 , nas = rep( NA , 10 ) , vals = sample( c( 1:3 , NA ) , 10 , repl = TRUE ) )
df
#      id nas vals
#   1   1  NA   NA
#   2   2  NA    2
#   3   3  NA    1
#   4   4  NA    2
#   5   5  NA    2
#   6   6  NA    3
#   7   7  NA    2
#   8   8  NA    3
#   9   9  NA    3
#   10 10  NA    2

#Use this command to remove columns that are entirely NA values, it will leave columns where only some values are NA
df[ , ! apply( df , 2 , function(x) all(is.na(x)) ) ]
#      id vals
#   1   1   NA
#   2   2    2
#   3   3    1
#   4   4    2
#   5   5    2
#   6   6    3
#   7   7    2
#   8   8    3
#   9   9    3
#   10 10    2

If you find yourself in the situation where you want to remove columns that have any NA values you can simply change the all command above to any.

8
  • The data.frame has two type of columns: one in whohc all values are numbers and the other in which all values are NA Apr 12, 2013 at 10:16
  • So this will work then. It only removes columns were ALL values are NA. Apr 12, 2013 at 10:16
  • 1
    Good solution. I would do apply(is.na(df), 1, all) though just because it's slightly neater and is.na() is used on all of df rather than one row at a time (show be a bit faster). Apr 12, 2013 at 10:29
  • @MadScone good tip - does look neater. You should apply across columns not rows though. Apr 12, 2013 at 10:40
  • @MadScone Edits are locked after 5 minutes on comments. I shouldn't worry, it's no biggie!! :-) Apr 12, 2013 at 10:55
23

Another option with Filter

Filter(function(x) !all(is.na(x)), df)

NOTE: Data from @Simon O'Hanlon's post.

23

An intuitive script: dplyr::select_if(~!all(is.na(.))). It literally keeps only not-all-elements-missing columns. (to delete all-element-missing columns).

> df <- data.frame( id = 1:10 , nas = rep( NA , 10 ) , vals = sample( c( 1:3 , NA ) , 10 , repl = TRUE ) )

> df %>% glimpse()
Observations: 10
Variables: 3
$ id   <int> 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
$ nas  <lgl> NA, NA, NA, NA, NA, NA, NA, NA, NA, NA
$ vals <int> NA, 1, 1, NA, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3, NA

> df %>% select_if(~!all(is.na(.))) 
   id vals
1   1   NA
2   2    1
3   3    1
4   4   NA
5   5    1
6   6    1
7   7    1
8   8    2
9   9    3
10 10   NA
18

Because performance was really important for me, I benchmarked all the functions above.

NOTE: Data from @Simon O'Hanlon's post. Only with size 15000 instead of 10.

library(tidyverse)
library(microbenchmark)

set.seed(123)
df <- data.frame(id = 1:15000,
                 nas = rep(NA, 15000), 
                 vals = sample(c(1:3, NA), 15000,
                               repl = TRUE))
df

MadSconeF1 <- function(x) x[, colSums(is.na(x)) != nrow(x)]

MadSconeF2 <- function(x) x[colSums(!is.na(x)) > 0]

BradCannell <- function(x) x %>% select_if(~sum(!is.na(.)) > 0)

SimonOHanlon <- function(x) x[ , !apply(x, 2 ,function(y) all(is.na(y)))]

jsta <- function(x) janitor::remove_empty(x)

SiboJiang <- function(x) x %>% dplyr::select_if(~!all(is.na(.)))

akrun <- function(x) Filter(function(y) !all(is.na(y)), x)

mbm <- microbenchmark(
  "MadSconeF1" = {MadSconeF1(df)},
  "MadSconeF2" = {MadSconeF2(df)},
  "BradCannell" = {BradCannell(df)},
  "SimonOHanlon" = {SimonOHanlon(df)},
  "SiboJiang" = {SiboJiang(df)},
  "jsta" = {jsta(df)}, 
  "akrun" = {akrun(df)},
  times = 1000)

mbm

Results:

Unit: microseconds
         expr    min      lq      mean  median      uq      max neval  cld
   MadSconeF1  154.5  178.35  257.9396  196.05  219.25   5001.0  1000 a   
   MadSconeF2  180.4  209.75  281.2541  226.40  251.05   6322.1  1000 a   
  BradCannell 2579.4 2884.90 3330.3700 3059.45 3379.30  33667.3  1000    d
 SimonOHanlon  511.0  565.00  943.3089  586.45  623.65 210338.4  1000  b  
    SiboJiang 2558.1 2853.05 3377.6702 3010.30 3310.00  89718.0  1000    d
         jsta 1544.8 1652.45 2031.5065 1706.05 1872.65  11594.9  1000   c 
        akrun   93.8  111.60  139.9482  121.90  135.45   3851.2  1000 a


autoplot(mbm)

enter image description here

mbm %>% 
  tbl_df() %>%
  ggplot(aes(sample = time)) + 
  stat_qq() + 
  stat_qq_line() +
  facet_wrap(~expr, scales = "free")

enter image description here

5
  • Sometimes the first iteration is a JIT compiled, so it has very poor, and not very characteristic, times. I think it’s interesting what the larger sample size does to the right tails of the distribution. This is good work. May 5, 2020 at 11:58
  • I run it once again, wasn't sure I changed the plot. Regarding the distribution, indeed. I should probably compare different sample sizes when I'll have the time.
    – DJV
    May 5, 2020 at 12:27
  • 1
    if you qqplot (ggplot2.tidyverse.org/reference/geom_qq.html) one of the trends, such as "akrun" then I bet there is one point that is very different from the distribution of the rest. The rest represent how long it takes if you run it repeatedly, but that represents what happens if you run it once. There is an old saying: you can have 20 years of experience or you can have only one years worth of experience 20 times. May 5, 2020 at 13:00
  • very nice! I’m surprised by several samples being in the extreme tail. I wonder why it is that those are so much more costly. JIT might be 1 or 2 but not 20. Condition? Interrupts? Other? Thanks again for the update. May 5, 2020 at 16:56
  • You're welcome, thank you for the thoughts. Don't know, I actually allowed it to run "freely".
    – DJV
    May 5, 2020 at 19:59
0

Try as follows:

df <- df[,colSums(is.na(df))<nrow(df)]
0

Another option using the map_lgl function from the purrr package, which returns a logical vector and using the [ to remove the columns with all NA. Here is a reproducible example:

set.seed(7)
df <- data.frame(id = 1:5 , nas = rep(NA, 5) , vals = sample(c(1:3,NA), 5, repl = TRUE))
df
#>   id nas vals
#> 1  1  NA    2
#> 2  2  NA    3
#> 3  3  NA    3
#> 4  4  NA   NA
#> 5  5  NA    3
library(purrr)
df[!map_lgl(df, ~ all(is.na(.)))]
#>   id vals
#> 1  1    2
#> 2  2    3
#> 3  3    3
#> 4  4   NA
#> 5  5    3

Created on 2022-08-28 with reprex v2.0.2

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