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just having a little issue with strtok and strcmp.

I'm trying to compare the input of a user via fgets to some predetermined string:

char *token[100];

fgets(s, sizeof(s), stdin)
token[0] = strtok(s, " "); // Get first word
printf("tok: %s", token[0]);
printf("cmp: %d\n", strcmp(token[0], "/bin/echo");

Obviously it's not all the code but this shows my problem - if I enter "/bin/echo ..." (or anything for that matter), it will be put into token[0], and get printed. It prints correctly but when it prints the cmp value it's never 0. For /bin/echo, the cmp value is 1 for some reason.

Thanks.

EDIT to clear up confusion about s and token:

char s[1024];
char *token[100];

EDIT 2 - Added some other test cases: I entered "/bin/echo hello world" to stdin

token[0] = strtok(s, " \n\0"); // Get first word
printf("token[0] is: %s", token[0]);
printf("cmp: %d\n", strcmp(token[0], "/bin/echo"));

Output:

token[0] is: /bin/echo
cmp: 1

And then I tried hardcoding the tokened string:

char str[] = "/bin/echo hello world";
token[0] = strtok(str, " ");
printf("token[0] is: %s", token[0]);
printf("cmp: %d\n", strcmp(token[0], "/bin/echo"));

Output:

token[0] is: /bin/echo
cmp: 0
share|improve this question
1  
We can start with code that compiles. (missing semi after fgets(), no declaration of s, missing closing paren on second printf(), just to name the ones I see arbitrarily). The real piece missing, though, is s. It better be a valid memory buffer of some kind. –  WhozCraig Apr 12 '13 at 11:12
2  
That said, I fixed, and ran, this code, declaring s as a local buffer char s[100]; and ran the code with input as "/bin/echo madness". it ran fine and reported 0 as the compare result, so whatever your problem is, this code isn't exhibiting it (beyond the compilation errors, anyway). –  WhozCraig Apr 12 '13 at 11:16
4  
I suspect you enter only "/bin/echo". Then you get the token "/bin/echo\n" since fgets includes the newline. –  Daniel Fischer Apr 12 '13 at 11:17
1  
Look at the sample I linked again. Those aren't hard-coded. It pulls from stdin. –  WhozCraig Apr 12 '13 at 11:40
1  
you realize the suspense of where they differed, not where they were similar is going to eat at me for the rest of the day, right? Whatever that difference was, it was why yours did not work, so perhaps share that. –  WhozCraig Apr 12 '13 at 11:46

3 Answers 3

here i have made small program

#include<string.h>
#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
char str[] ="/bin/echo this is something";
  char * token[100];
  token[0] = strtok (str," ");

token[0] = strtok(str, " "); // Get first word
printf("cmp: %d\n", strcmp(token[0], "/bin/echo"));
return 0;
}

Here i have statically stored input string instead of fgets()

That works fine.

see http://codepad.org/IrGAXT8f

share|improve this answer
    
Just tried this and it works - only problem is I need to get the input from command line stdin, so hard coding the str[] wont work unfortunately :( –  Travv92 Apr 12 '13 at 11:30

Use

char token[1000];
strcpy(token,strtok(s," "));

string's can't be assigned directly like this in c :)

also, include string.h

share|improve this answer
3  
This is not just wrong, its wrong at the top of its voice. Read strtok()s documentation, then look at the type of the token pointer array. –  WhozCraig Apr 12 '13 at 11:09
    
One can't copy strings to uninitialized memory. You need need to allocate memory first. –  user206334 Apr 12 '13 at 11:12
2  
@user206334 One need not copy strings at all if you understand strtok() and what it returns. –  WhozCraig Apr 12 '13 at 11:14
    
@WhozCraig strtok messes with buffer adding '\0' in delimiter places as a future marker. That's why it's not const char * and you can't use strtok with static memory objects like literal strings. –  user206334 Apr 12 '13 at 11:16
1  
@user206334 that's somewhat the point of the function of strtok(). That isn't the problem the OP is having, and from what I see, has nothing to do with this answer or its incorrectness. –  WhozCraig Apr 12 '13 at 11:18

One needs to allocate memory dynamically for copying strings. Read about dynamic memory management first (malloc, calloc, etc...)

EDIT: http://ideone.com/0UxEwO - works for me

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
    char s[1024];
    char *token[100];
    fgets(s, sizeof(s), stdin);
    token[0] = strtok(s, " \n\0");
    printf("token[0] is: %s", token[0]);
    printf("cmp: %d\n", strcmp(token[0], "/bin/echo"));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Downvoter please explain how did s get allocated? One either needs to statically specify array size or dynamically allocate memory. One can't simply use char * s = fgets(...). –  user206334 Apr 12 '13 at 11:20
    
I didn't down-vote this, but where do you see the OP using char *s = fgets(...) ? The lack of any s is one of the many things wrong with the code, but nothing says it must be dynamically allocated. It could just as well be a stack var. –  WhozCraig Apr 12 '13 at 11:22
    
Sorry, probably should've shown s and token being initialized. Added to OP. –  Travv92 Apr 12 '13 at 11:27

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