42

Wondering if there is a way to insert a row into a table from another, with exception of one column?

This is of course easy with a limitied amount of columns, but gets kind of tiredsome listing all of the columns when the number of columns increases.

I'm thinking something in the line of:

Insert into table
select * replace col1 with current date
from table
where yada yada yada

One possiblilty would be to duplicate one row and perform and update, but let's say that's not an option due to an index or something.

Any ideas?

Edit: It's DB2 v10, but the question is out of pure curiousity. Just wondering if it is possible...

4
  • What RDBMS you are using? RDBMS stands for Relational Database Management System. RDBMS is the basis for SQL, and for all modern database systems like MS SQL Server, IBM DB2, Oracle, MySQL, etc...
    – John Woo
    Apr 12, 2013 at 13:33
  • I don't know which rdbms are you using, but I doubt any would allow such operation. Besides, even if you have large amount of columns, it's consider best pracice to use list of columns instead of *, especially in an evironment when someone other that you may change the structure of a table.
    – AdamL
    Apr 12, 2013 at 13:35
  • Another reason why select * are bad. Name your columns. Apr 12, 2013 at 13:35
  • @JW It's DB2, but I'm actually just curious to see if it even is possible, not that I would use it...
    – bek
    Apr 12, 2013 at 13:40

6 Answers 6

34

You can use temporary tables

Create Temporary table

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE temp_table AS (SELECT * FROM MyTable WHERE ...);

Update column

UPDATE temp_table SET column='Value' WHERE ...;

Or drop a column

ALTER TABLE temp_table DROP column_name;

Insert to destination table

INSERT INTO MyDestinationTable SELECT * FROM temp_table;
3
18

For SQL Server, the syntax would be:

insert  into TargetTable
        (col1, col2, col3, ...)
select  getdate(), col2, col3, ... 
from    SourceTable

SQL Server can generate a column list for you. Right click the table name, and choose Script as -> Select -> To New Window.

3
  • 6
    Thank you for your answer, was just curious to see if there was a solution where you didn't have to list the attributes.
    – bek
    Apr 12, 2013 at 13:45
  • This works with system tables like mysql.db
    – Simon
    Jul 3, 2023 at 9:39
  • MySQL also supports this syntax Sep 18, 2023 at 16:28
3

using Oracle

DECLARE
CURSOR CUR_D IS
  SELECT *
  FROM TABLE
  WHERE id = some id;
ROW_D CUR_D%ROWTYPE;

BEGIN
  OPEN CUR_D;
  FETCH CUR_D INTO ROW_D;
  CLOSE CUR_D;

  ROW_D.column := 'some data';

  INSERT INTO some table
  VALUES ROW_D;

END;
/
0
3

Create a VIEW with required number for columns.

Assume Tbl1 has 4 columns. Create a view with required columns. Here Col1 has been excluded.

CREATE VIEW V1 AS
SELECT col2, col3, col4
FROM TBL1

Use the VIEW for Inserting. Col1 value for TBL2 will be current date, for other columns, the values will be from view V1 ie., col2, col3, col4 from TBL1

INSERT INTO TBL2
SELECT GETDATE(), * 
FROM V1

This way you dont need to specify all the columns each time.

Hope it helps

2

zim RDBMS will allow it. All fields matching by fieldname will obtain values from the source, unless overridden by a let statement. eg.

    `add all details from details where account_month = 20190101 let level = 2 increase = base * 1.1 total = increase * amount`

This would for all detail records for the specified accounting month, add a level 2 record with all field values matching the source set, except these assigned/calculated amounts: level is 2. increase is original base times 1.1. total is new increase (original base times 1.1) times the amount. If you switch the order of assignment of increase and total, then total will use the source/original increase in the calculation.

1

assuming that your select has attributes uniquely defining the result set wrt to the contents of your target table before insertion, you can apply the following 2 steps:

 Insert into target_table
 select *
  from source_table
 where yada yada yada
   and characteristic_yada
     ;

update target_table
   set col1 = current date
 where characteristic_yada
     ;

 commit;

make sure to issue both commands inside the same transaction as shown. also be aware that characteristic_yada must be aplicable to source and target table alike and that the suitability of characteristic_yada needs to be checked before each application of the statements unless they refer to pks/aks of the taregt table

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.