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I want to detect if the request came from the localhost:5000 or foo.herokuapp.com host and what path was requested. How do I get this information about a Flask request?

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5 Answers 5

371

You can examine the url through several Request fields:

Imagine your application is listening on the following application root:

http://www.example.com/myapplication

And a user requests the following URI:

http://www.example.com/myapplication/foo/page.html?x=y

In this case the values of the above mentioned attributes would be the following:

    path             /foo/page.html
    full_path        /foo/page.html?x=y
    script_root      /myapplication
    base_url         http://www.example.com/myapplication/foo/page.html
    url              http://www.example.com/myapplication/foo/page.html?x=y
    url_root         http://www.example.com/myapplication/

You can easily extract the host part with the appropriate splits.

An example of using this:

from flask import request

@app.route('/')
def index():
    return request.base_url
3
  • 4
    new to Flask, i didn’t know where request object come from and how it works, here it is: flask.pocoo.org/docs/0.12/reqcontext
    – Ulysse BN
    Jan 27, 2017 at 23:20
  • 1
    url_root returns http://www.example.com/ not http://www.example.com/myapplication/ base_url returns http://www.example.com/myapplication/
    – moto
    Dec 4, 2018 at 21:27
  • my app route is like @app.route('/index/<int:id1>/<int:id2>') how can i guest path from request without variables. I expect /index in result. Which flask function to use? Nov 28, 2019 at 16:11
344

another example:

request:

curl -XGET http://127.0.0.1:5000/alert/dingding/test?x=y

then:

request.method:              GET
request.url:                 http://127.0.0.1:5000/alert/dingding/test?x=y
request.base_url:            http://127.0.0.1:5000/alert/dingding/test
request.url_charset:         utf-8
request.url_root:            http://127.0.0.1:5000/
str(request.url_rule):       /alert/dingding/test
request.host_url:            http://127.0.0.1:5000/
request.host:                127.0.0.1:5000
request.script_root:
request.path:                /alert/dingding/test
request.full_path:           /alert/dingding/test?x=y

request.args:                ImmutableMultiDict([('x', 'y')])
request.args.get('x'):       y
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  • 2
    For people who want to use request.full_path, suggest to use request.environ['RAW_URI'] instead. Because, when the actual full query path is /alert/dingding/test, request.full_path returns /alert/dingding/test?, an extra question mark will be added to the result, which might not be desirable. Nov 24, 2020 at 3:59
  • request.remote_addr for 127.0.0.1 Jan 12, 2022 at 1:27
  • 2
    what is the different flask "host_url" "root_url" "url_root"?
    – CS QGB
    Jul 5, 2022 at 10:10
  • request.query_string
    – anvd
    Aug 25, 2022 at 14:15
14

you should try:

request.url 

It suppose to work always, even on localhost (just did it).

1
  • what is the different flask "host_url" "root_url" "url_root"?
    – CS QGB
    Jul 5, 2022 at 10:10
2

If you are using Python, I would suggest by exploring the request object:

dir(request)

Since the object support the method dict:

request.__dict__

It can be printed or saved. I use it to log 404 codes in Flask:

@app.errorhandler(404)
def not_found(e):
    with open("./404.csv", "a") as f:
        f.write(f'{datetime.datetime.now()},{request.__dict__}\n')
    return send_file('static/images/Darknet-404-Page-Concept.png', mimetype='image/png')
1
  • what is the different flask "host_url" "root_url" "url_root"?
    – CS QGB
    Jul 5, 2022 at 10:10
1

if user requests the following URI:

http://www.example.com/myapplication/foo/page.html?x=y

and the user wants y

you can use

request.args.get("x")

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