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Does naybody knows a way to use Jersey's GET method to return a JSON that returns only some fields of an entity instead of all? Does anybody know a way to use Jersey's GET method to return a JSON that returns only some fields of an entity instead of all? E.g. in the following class I want to receive (with POST) values for 'name' and for 'confidential', buy while returning (with GET) I only need 'name' value, not 'confidential'.

@Entity
@Table(name = "a")
@XmlRootElement
@JsonIgnoreProperties({"confifentialInfo"})
public class A extends B implements Serializable {
    private String name;
    @Basic(optional = false)
    private String confifentialInfo;
    // more fields, getters and setters
}
  • why not just return all fields in the entity and use only what you need? – Bizmarck Apr 13 '13 at 2:35
  • I am retuning values via REST so the user will see the returned fields. – Molly Apr 13 '13 at 16:15
  • Look up JsonViews and JsonFilters on jackson's wiki – Neil McGuigan Apr 16 '13 at 7:04
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If you are using the JAXB approach, you can mark fields with @XmlTransient to omit them. If you are using POJO mapping or want to exclude fields only for some requests, you should construct the JSON with the low level JSON API.

  • Does JAXB support to receive values (using POST) and saving them to the database but do not returning (using GET) those values? – Molly Apr 13 '13 at 14:58
  • @Molly Usually you can do whatever you want with the values you receive and return anything you want, no matter if it's GET or POST. How you should do it depends on your code. I think you should edit your question and include an example of your GET method and the entity you want to return. – kapex Apr 13 '13 at 17:26
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If you are using Jackson, you can use the annotation @JsonIgnore for methods

Marker annotation similar to javax.xml.bind.annotation.XmlTransient that indicates that the annotated method is to be ignored by introspection-based serialization and deserialization functionality. That is, it should not be consider a "getter", "setter" or "creator".

And @JsonIgnoreProperties for properties

Annotation that can be used to either suppress serialization of properties (during serialization), or ignore processing of JSON properties read (during deserialization).

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