5

I've been reading the blogs about rust and this closure for example made me wonder:

fn each<E>(t: &Tree<E>, f: &fn(&E) -> bool) {
if !f(&t.elem) {
    return;
}

for t.children.each |child| { each(child, f); }
}

why couldn't it be:

each<E>(t: &Tree<E>, f: &(&E) -> bool) {
if !f(&t.elem) {
    return;
}

for t.children.each |child| { each(child, f); }
}

Maybe i'm missing something on the class system that would prevent this.

24

It makes parsing more complicated for compilers, syntax-highlighters, shell scripts and humans (i.e. everyone).

For example, with fn, foo takes a function that has two int arguments and returns nothing, and bar takes a pointer to a tuple of 2 ints

fn foo(f: &fn(int, int)) {}
fn bar(t: &(int, int)) {}

Without fn, the arguments for both become &(int, int) and the compiler couldn't distinguish them. Sure one could come up with other rules so they are written differently, but these almost certainly have no advantages over just using fn.

5

Some of the fn's may seem extraneous, but this has a side benefit that rust code is extremely easy to navigate with 'grep'. To find the definition of function 'foo', you simply grep "fn\sfoo". To see the major definitions in a source file, just grep for "(fn|struct|trait|impl|enum|type)".

This is extremely helpful at this early stage when rust lacks IDE's, and probably does simplify the grammar in other ways.

Making the grammar less ambiguous than C++ is a major goal , it makes generic programming easier (you dont have to bring in so much definition into a compile unit, in a specific order, to correctly parse it), and should make future tooling easier. A feature to auto-insert 'fn's would be pretty straightforward compared to many of the issues current C++ IDE's have to deal with.

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