23

I am trying to implement my own Exception class in C#. For this purpose I have created a CustomException class derived from Exception.

class CustomException : Exception
{
    public CustomException()
        : base() { }

    public CustomException(string message)
        : base(message) { }

    public CustomException(string format, params object[] args)
        : base(string.Format(format, args)) { }

    public CustomException(string message, Exception innerException)
        : base(message, innerException) { }

    public CustomException(string format, Exception innerException, params object[] args)
        : base(string.Format(format, args), innerException) { }
}

Then I use it

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    try
    {
        var zero = 0;
        var s = 2 / zero;
    }
    catch (CustomException ex)
    {
        Console.Write("Exception");
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

I'm expecting I will get my exception but all I get is a standard DivideByZeroException. How can I catch a divide by zero exception using my CustomException class? Thanks.

  • 10
    Why should .NET start to use your exception? You have to throw it yourself. – Rango Apr 13 '13 at 21:14
  • okay, even if I add throw new Exception to catch section I will not get it. I will continue to get standart exception. Do I need to write some code in my CustomException to catch DevideByZero Exceptions? – JohnyMotorhead Apr 13 '13 at 21:19
  • You should not if you throw before the div by zero or use Alexei's approach. By the way: I think it is not good practice to replace exceptions unless you have very good reasons. – Linus Caldwell Apr 13 '13 at 21:20
29

You can't magically change type of exception thrown by existing code.

You need to throw your exception to be able to catch it:

try 
{
   try
    {
        var zero = 0;
        var s = 2 / zero;
    }
    catch (DivideByZeroException ex)
    { 
        // catch and convert exception
        throw new CustomException("Divide by Zero!!!!");
    }
}
catch (CustomException ex)
{
    Console.Write("Exception");
    Console.ReadKey();
}
  • 18
    You might want to mention that it's a horrible idea to do this. – Wilbert Dec 6 '13 at 15:39
  • 2
    @Wilbert which part? 2/zero is probably easiest way to get very specific exception (((string)(null)).Length may look more obviously "sample code - don't copy"); re-throwing different exception is pretty standard practice when some high level operation fails due one of many different exception (IOException, KeyNotFoundException and like can be re-throw as CustomerNotFoundException, maybe with InnerException set to that exception, or maybe not due to security requirements); hopefully it is clear that nested try/catch is just a sample. – Alexei Levenkov Dec 6 '13 at 17:27
  • Yeah, with that context it makes sense, but just the code sample.. well :) – Wilbert Dec 9 '13 at 9:54
  • @AlexeiLevenkov why standard exception dont need throw keyword?? – AminM Jun 16 '17 at 15:58
  • 1
    @AminM - they are thrown, by existing code. The reason you need to manually throw custom exceptions is because the custom exceptions don't have hooks in the framework (how could they?). So you either throw them based on some logic in your method/function, or you throw them in lieu of a standard exception as in this example. – Jesse Williams Nov 7 '18 at 14:50
17

First of all, if you want to see your own exception, you should throw it somewhere in your code:

public static int DivideBy(this int x, int y)
{
    if (y == 0)
    {
        throw new CustomException("divide by zero");
    }

   return x/y; 

}

then:

int a = 5;
int b = 0;
try
{
      a.DivideBy(b);
}
catch(CustomException)
{
//....
}

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