53

I was wondering how I'd go about implementing a method in javascript that removes all elements of an array that clear a certain condition. (Preferably without using jQuery)

Ex.

ar = [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ];
ar.removeIf( function(item, idx) {
    return item > 3;
});

The above would go through each item in the array and remove all those that return true for the condition (in the example, item > 3).

I'm just starting out in javascript and was wondering if anyone knew of a short efficient way to get this done.

--update--

It would also be great if the condition could work on object properties as well.

Ex.

ar = [ {num:1, str:"a"}, {num:2, str:"b"}, {num:3, str:"c"} ];
ar.removeIf( function(item, idx) {
    return item.str == "c";
});

Where the item would be removed if item.str == "c"

--update2--

It would be nice if index conditions could work as well.

Ex.

ar = [ {num:1, str:"a"}, {num:2, str:"b"}, {num:3, str:"c"} ];
ar.removeIf( function(item, idx) {
    return idx == 2;
});
37

You could add your own method to Array that does something similar, if filter does not work for you.

Array.prototype.removeIf = function(callback) {
    var i = 0;
    while (i < this.length) {
        if (callback(this[i], i)) {
            this.splice(i, 1);
        }
        else {
            ++i;
        }
    }
};

To me, that's one of the coolest features of JavaScript. Ian pointed out a more efficient way to do the same thing. Considering that it's JavaScript, every bit helps:

Array.prototype.removeIf = function(callback) {
    var i = this.length;
    while (i--) {
        if (callback(this[i], i)) {
            this.splice(i, 1);
        }
    }
};

This avoids the need to even worry about the updating length or catching the next item, as you work your way left rather than right.

  • jsfiddle.net/n8JEy/3 This works. – pickypg Apr 14 '13 at 5:27
  • Thanks, works great. I like how this takes into consideration the index changes through splicing during iteration. – dk123 Apr 14 '13 at 5:30
  • 4
    That's a little messy. Try jsfiddle.net/n8JEy/4 - and you didn't pass i to the callback as the second param – Ian Apr 14 '13 at 5:39
  • @Ian I tend to prefer readability, but your solution is certainly more efficient. I also added the index as the second parameter (simply ignored it originally as it was not used, and I assumed that he didn't need it). – pickypg Apr 14 '13 at 5:45
  • @dk123 As a newcomer to JavaScript, you are free to control the parameters of such callbacks as you see fit, and you can add whatever you want to them so long as the information is available (e.g., you could add the current array's length using this.length as a third parameter, if you had some inclination). – pickypg Apr 14 '13 at 5:48
56

You can use Array filter method.

The code would look like this:

ar = [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ];
ar = ar.filter( function(item) {
    return !(item > 3);
});
  • 19
    If you translate !(item > 3) into human language, it will be item <= 3. – Miha_x64 Jan 10 at 17:55
30

You can use Array.filter(), which does the opposite:

ar.filter(function(item, idx) {
    return item <= 3;
});
  • 2
    As a head's up that is not supported in IE8 or below. You should also either negate the original expression, or it should be <=. – pickypg Apr 14 '13 at 5:02
  • 14
    Doesn't Array.filter() return a new array with the filtered elements? Is there something that just removes the elements from the array? – dk123 Apr 14 '13 at 5:03
  • @dk123: There's nothing pre-made. You'll have to write a for loop., – Blender Apr 14 '13 at 5:05
  • Making a new array with Array.filter will likely be faster than manually splicing out of the given array. – Casey Chu Apr 14 '13 at 5:31
  • 1
    @Ian: It seems to be faster for me: jsperf.com/splice-vs-filter – Blender Apr 14 '13 at 5:45
2

I love these kinds of questions and just a different version from me too... :)

Array.prototype.removeIf = function(expression) {
   var res = [];
    for(var idx=0; idx<this.length; idx++)
    {
      var currentItem = this[idx];
        if(!expression(currentItem))
        {
            res.push(currentItem);
        }
    }
    return res;
}

ar = [ 1, 2, 3, 4 ];
var result = ar.removeIf(expCallBack);


console.log(result);
function expCallBack(item)
{
    return item > 3;
}
  • 1
    Could you perhaps modify(or add another method) your code a bit to actually remove elements instead of returning a new array? Thanks for the reply. – dk123 Apr 14 '13 at 5:25
  • 3
    whoever downvoted this so wrong. this is the best perfoming answer out of all of them. check the test by @Blender jsperf.com/splice-vs-filter. it's at least 2x faster and as much as 15x faster in the latest versions of Firefox – parliament May 16 '15 at 1:53
2

simply write the following example if condition could work on object properties as well

var ar = [ {num:1, str:"a"}, {num:2, str:"b"}, {num:3, str:"c"} ];
var newArray = [];
for (var i = 0, len = ar.length; i<len; i++) {
        if (ar[i].str == "b") 
        {newArray.push(ar[i]);};
 };
console.log(newArray);

See the example Live Example

2

You can use lodash.remove

var array = [1, 2, 3, 4];
var evens = _.remove(array, function(n) {
  return n % 2 == 0;
});

console.log(array);
// => [1, 3]

console.log(evens);
// => [2, 4]

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