42

Is there a way to implement list comprehension in R?

Like python:

sum([x for x in range(1000) if x % 3== 0 or x % 5== 0])

same in Haskell:

sum [x| x<-[1..1000-1], x`mod` 3 ==0 || x `mod` 5 ==0 ]

What's the practical way to apply this in R?

Nick

0
37

Something like this?

l <- 1:1000
sum(l[l %% 3 == 0 | l %% 5 == 0])
5
  • 1
    Thanks! (Put spaces around operators %% may improve readability.)
    – Nick
    Apr 14 '13 at 12:12
  • 4
    Not that it will make a difference, but this would be faster as it uses integers and does not create another vector: sum(l * (l %% 3L == 0L | l %% 5L == 0L))
    – flodel
    Apr 14 '13 at 16:52
  • 4
    @flodel You're right, I should have strictly used integers. In your solution though, how is another vector not created? Does l %% 3L == 0L | l %% 5L == 0L not create a logical vector? Apr 15 '13 at 9:51
  • To be absolutely identical, first line in R shall be: l <- 0:999, otherwise end results will be different. Apr 14 '17 at 20:03
  • In terms of readability using the letter 'l' as a variable name is not what I would recommend. It is hard to distinguish it from the integer '1'. Aug 1 '19 at 5:50
9

Yes, list comprehension is possible in R:

sum((1:1000)[(1:1000 %% 3) == 0 | (1:1000 %% 5) == 0])
0
3

And, (kind of) the for-comprehension of scala:

for(i in {x <- 1:100;x[x%%2 == 0]})print(i)
2
  • Is it also possible to directly yield from a for loop like in Scala?
    – bluenote10
    Oct 20 '14 at 13:47
  • 4
    That is the role of the sapply family functions x <- sapply(1:10,function(x)x*x)
    – PedroB
    Oct 20 '14 at 16:18
2

The foreach package by Revolution Analytics gives us a handy interface to list comprehensions in R. https://www.r-bloggers.com/list-comprehensions-in-r/

Example

Return numbers from the list which are not equal as tuple:

Python

list_a = [1, 2, 3]
list_b = [2, 7]

different_num = [(a, b) for a in list_a for b in list_b if a != b]

print(different_num) 

# Output: 
[(1, 2), (1, 7), (2, 7), (3, 2), (3, 7)]

R

require(foreach)

list_a = c(1, 2, 3)
list_b = c(2, 7)

different_num  <- foreach(a=list_a ,.combine = c ) %:% foreach(b=list_b) %:% when(a!=b) %do% c(a,b)

print(different_num)

# Output:
         [[1]]
         [1] 1 2

         [[2]]
         [1] 1 7

         [[3]]
         [1] 2 7

         [[4]]
         [1] 3 2

         [[5]]
         [1] 3 7

EDIT:
The foreach package is very slow for certain tasks. A faster list comprehension implementation is given at List comprehensions for R

. <<- structure(NA, class="comprehension")

comprehend <- function(expr, vars, seqs, guard, comprehension=list()){
  if(length(vars)==0){  # base case of recursion
    if(eval(guard)) comprehension[[length(comprehension)+1]] <- eval(expr)
  } else {
    for(elt in eval(seqs[[1]])){
      assign(vars[1], elt, inherits=TRUE)
      comprehension <- comprehend(expr, vars[-1], seqs[-1], guard, 
                                  comprehension)
    }
  }
  comprehension
}

## List comprehensions specified by close approximation to set-builder notation:
##
##   { x+y | 0<x<9, 0<y<x, x*y<30 } ---> .[ x+y ~ {x<-0:9; y<-0:x} |  x*y<30 ]
##

"[.comprehension" <- function(x, f,rectangularizing=T){
  f <- substitute(f)
  ## First, we pluck out the optional guard, if it is present:
  if(is.call(f) && is.call(f[[3]]) && f[[3]][[1]]=='|'){
    guard <- f[[3]][[3]]
    f[[3]] <- f[[3]][[2]]
  } else {
    guard <- TRUE
  }
  ## To allow omission of braces around a lone comprehension generator,
  ## as in 'expr ~ var <- seq' we make allowances for two shapes of f:
  ##
  ## (1)    (`<-` (`~` expr
  ##                   var)
  ##              seq)
  ## and
  ##
  ## (2)    (`~` expr
  ##             (`{` (`<-` var1 seq1)
  ##                  (`<-` var2 seq2)
  ##                      ...
  ##                  (`<-` varN <- seqN)))
  ##
  ## In the former case, we set gens <- list(var <- seq), unifying the
  ## treatment of both shapes under the latter, more general one.
  syntax.error <- "Comprehension expects 'expr ~ {x1 <- seq1; ... ; xN  <- seqN}'."
  if(!is.call(f) || (f[[1]]!='<-' && f[[1]]!='~'))
    stop(syntax.error)
  if(is(f,'<-')){ # (1)
    lhs <- f[[2]]
    if(!is.call(lhs) || lhs[[1]] != '~')
      stop(syntax.error)
    expr <- lhs[[2]]
    var <- as.character(lhs[[3]])
    seq <- f[[3]]
    gens <- list(call('<-', var, seq))
  } else { # (2)
    expr <- f[[2]]
    gens <- as.list(f[[3]])[-1]
    if(any(lapply(gens, class) != '<-'))
      stop(syntax.error)
  }
  ## Fill list comprehension .LC
  vars <- as.character(lapply(gens, function(g) g[[2]]))
  seqs <- lapply(gens, function(g) g[[3]])
  .LC <- comprehend(expr, vars, seqs, guard)

  ## Provided the result is rectangular, convert it to a vector or array
  if(!rectangularizing) return(.LC)
  tryCatch({
     if(!length(.LC))
      return(.LC)
  dim1 <- dim(.LC[[1]])
  if(is.null(dim1)){
    lengths <- sapply(.LC, length)
    if(all(lengths == lengths[1])){ # rectangular
      .LC <- unlist(.LC)
      if(lengths[1] > 1) # matrix
        dim(.LC) <- c(lengths[1], length(lengths))
    } else { # ragged
      # leave .LC as a list
    }
  } else { # elements of .LC have dimension
    dim <- c(dim1, length(.LC))
    .LC <- unlist(.LC)
    dim(.LC) <- dim
  }
  return(.LC)
  }, error = function(err) {
    return(.LC)
  })

}

This implementation is faster then foreach, it allows nested comprehension, multiple parameters and parameters scoping.

 N <- list(10,20)
.[.[c(x,y,z)~{x <- 2:n;y <- x:n;z <- y:n} | {x^2+y^2==z^2 & z<15}]~{n <- N}]

[[1]]
[[1]][[1]]
[1] 3 4 5

[[1]][[2]]
[1]  6  8 10


[[2]]
[[2]][[1]]
[1] 3 4 5

[[2]][[2]]
[1]  5 12 13

[[2]][[3]]
[1]  6  8 10
2

This is many years later but there are three list comprehension packages now on CRAN. Each has slightly different syntax. In alphabetical order:

library(comprehenr)
sum(to_vec(for(x in 1:1000) if (x %% 3 == 0 | x %% 5 == 0) x))
## [1] 234168

library(eList)
Sum(for(x in 1:1000) if (x %% 3 == 0 | x %% 5 == 0) x else 0)
## [1] 234168

library(listcompr)
sum(gen.vector(x, x = 1:1000, x %% 3 == 0 | x %% 5 == 0))
## [1] 234168

In addition the following is on github only.

# devtools::install.github("mailund/lc")
library(lc)
sum(unlist(lc(x, x = seq(1000), x %% 3 == 0 | x %% 5 == 0)))
## [1] 234168
1
  • I just noticed that listcompr was already mentioned in another answer but I still think it would be useful to list them all so I will just leave it as is. Feb 10 at 2:01
1

Another way

sum(l<-(1:1000)[l %% 3 == 0 | l %% 5 == 0])
1

I hope it's okay to self-promote my package listcompr which implements a list comprehension syntax for R.

The example from the question can be solved in the following way:

library(listcompr)
sum(gen.vector(x, x = 1:1000, x %% 3 == 0 || x %% 5 == 0))

## Returns: 234168

As listcompr does a row-wise (and not a vector-vise) evaluation of the conditions, it makes no difference if || or | is used a logical operator. It accepts arbitrary many arguments: First, a base expression which is transformed into the list or vector entries. Next, arbitrary many arguments which specify the variable ranges and the conditions.

More examples can be found on the readme page on the github repository of listcompr: https://github.com/patrickroocks/listcompr

0

This list comprehension of the form:

[item for item in list if test]

is pretty straightforward with boolean indexing in R. But for more complex expressions, like implementing vector rescaling (I know this can be done with scales package too), in Python it's easy:

x = [1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11] # -> [0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0]
[(xi - min(x))/(max(x) - min(x)) for xi in x]

But in R this is the best I could come up with. Would love to know if there's something better:

sapply(x, function(xi, mn, mx) {(xi-mn)/(mx-mn)}, mn = min(x), mx = max(x))
1
  • 3
    With vectorization and recycling in R, you can just do (x - min(x)) / (max(x) - min(x)). You don't need for or sapply at all. Jul 11 '18 at 1:57
0

You could convert a sequence of random numbers to a binary sequence as follows:

x=runif(1000)
y=NULL
for (i in x){if (i>.5){y<-c(y,1)}else{y=c(y,-1)}}

this could be generalized to operate on any list to another list based on:

x = [item for item in x if test == True]

where the test could use the else statement to not append the list y.

For the problem at hand:

x <- 0:999 
y <- NULL 
for (i in x){ if (i %% 3 == 0 | i %% 5 == 0){ y <- c(y, i) }}
sum( y )
7
  • 3
    While this is syntactically valid and gives a correct result, it is very poor R code. Running a quick benchmark on a vector of size 10k, this method takes 215 milliseconds, while the simpler code y = ifelse(x > 0.5, 1,-1) is about 250x faster at 0.9 milliseconds, and just doing a little bit of algebra y = (x > 0.5) * 2L - 1L is nearly 2500x faster at 0.1 milliseconds. Using for loops when vectorized operations are possible and "growing" objects by concatenation inside loops are two of the worst things you can do for performance in R. Jul 10 '18 at 2:49
  • I'm also confused why you're using this example instead of OP's problem from the question... Jul 10 '18 at 2:51
  • I had the same problem trying to use a list comprehension and posted my solution so others could find it. Admittedly it’s not optimal, but the ifelse that you proposed is faster, albeit it loses generality.
    – John
    Jul 11 '18 at 0:40
  • I think this could be a good answer if you (a) mentioned pros and cons of this approach (pros: generality, quite readable - especially if you're coming from a different language; cons: not idiomatic for R, quite inefficient) and (b) demonstrated the technique on the question posed, instead some new question (if generality is one of your pros, it should be easy to answer the question that was asked). Jul 11 '18 at 1:57
  • > fast<-function(){x <- 0:999;y <- NULL;y <- which( x%%3 == 0 | x %% 5 == 0) - 1;return( sum( y ))} > system.time(replicate(10000,fast)) user system elapsed 0.012 0.000 0.010 > slow_but_list_comprehension<-function(){x< - 0:999; y <- NULL; for (i in x){ if (x %% 3 | x %% 5){ y <- c(y, i) }; return( sum( y ))}} > system.time(replicate(10000,slow_but_list_comprehension)) user system elapsed 0.008 0.000 0.011
    – John
    Jul 12 '18 at 1:11

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