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How would one, using Python, approximate the font width of a given string of text?

I am looking for a function with a prototype similar to:

def getApproximateFontWidth(the_string, font_name="Arial", font_size=12):
   return ... picas or pixels or something similar ...

I'm not looking for anything very rigorous, an approximation will be fine.

The motivation for this is that I am generating a truncated string in my webapp's backend and sending it to the front-end to be displayed. Most of the time the strings are lower case, but sometimes the strings are in all caps, making them very wide. If the string isn't properly trucated it looks ugly. I'd like to know how much to truncate the strings based on their approximate width. If it's off by 10% it's not a big deal, this is a cosmetic feature.

  • Could you do it on the frontend with CSS or JS? – Alex L Apr 16 '13 at 5:23
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    In theory yes, this could be done on the frontend, but the amount of displayed text is very small compared to the full text. I'm rendering just a snippet(one or two lines), out of what could be many pages (possibly hundreds). I'd prefer to keep it on the backend if possible. – speedplane Mar 11 '16 at 4:04
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    text-overflow: ellipsis looks ugly for short texts. hindi, tibetian, thai, korean and chinese are fixed-width, latin and cyrillic should be rendered by characters into a lookup-table that is quick, and then you can use that lookup table to calculate the width of any string. The arabic and urdu should be more complex because of the automatic ligatures. – Barney Dec 18 '19 at 17:44
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Below is my simple solution, which gets you on the order of 80% accuracy, perfect for my purposes. It only works for Arial and it assumes 12 pt font, but it's probably proportional to other fonts as well.

def getApproximateArialStringWidth(st):
    size = 0 # in milinches
    for s in st:
        if s in 'lij|\' ': size += 37
        elif s in '![]fI.,:;/\\t': size += 50
        elif s in '`-(){}r"': size += 60
        elif s in '*^zcsJkvxy': size += 85
        elif s in 'aebdhnopqug#$L+<>=?_~FZT' + string.digits: size += 95
        elif s in 'BSPEAKVXY&UwNRCHD': size += 112
        elif s in 'QGOMm%W@': size += 135
        else: size += 50
    return size * 6 / 1000.0 # Convert to picas

And if you want to truncate a string, here it is:

def truncateToApproximateArialWidth(st, width):
    size = 0 # 1000 = 1 inch
    width = width * 1000 / 6 # Convert from picas to miliinches
    for i, s in enumerate(st):
        if s in 'lij|\' ': size += 37
        elif s in '![]fI.,:;/\\t': size += 50
        elif s in '`-(){}r"': size += 60
        elif s in '*^zcsJkvxy': size += 85
        elif s in 'aebdhnopqug#$L+<>=?_~FZT' + string.digits: size += 95
        elif s in 'BSPEAKVXY&UwNRCHD': size += 112
        elif s in 'QGOMm%W@': size += 135
        else: size += 50
        if size >= width:
            return st[:i+1]
    return st

Then the following:

>> width = 15
>> print truncateToApproxArialWidth("the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog", width) 
the quick brown fox jumps over the
>> print truncateToApproxArialWidth("THE QUICK BROWN FOX JUMPS OVER THE LAZY DOG", width) 
THE QUICK BROWN FOX JUMPS

When rendered, those strings are roughly the same width:

the quick brown fox jumps over the

THE QUICK BROWN FOX JUMPS

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  • 2
    Why does this seem better to you than PIL's font.getsize('spam')? – tom10 Apr 15 '13 at 6:03
  • PIL is a sorta big library which also needs to load font files. I'm only looking for an approximation and didn't want to rely on PIL if I didn't have to. PIL will certainly be more accurate and will probably work better for non-ascii characters, but for my purposes, the approximation is fine. – speedplane Apr 15 '13 at 12:46
  • It would have been useful to list these criteria in your question. – tom10 Apr 15 '13 at 15:29
4

You could render an image with the text using PIL and then determine the resulting image width.

http://effbot.org/imagingbook/imagefont.htm

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  • Ya, that would be the accurate and rigorous way, but I'd like to avoid rendering images. I'm just going to write this up on my own and post here. – speedplane Apr 15 '13 at 4:45
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    Use the getsize method of the loaded font, e.g. font.getsize('spam'). It returns a tuple of (width, height) in pixels. – Eryk Sun Apr 15 '13 at 4:57
1

I have used a library that does this however it requires pygame: http://inside.catlin.edu/site/compsci/ics/python/graphics.py Look under sizeString

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  • That looks like it's going to render the text, which I'd like to avoid. – speedplane Apr 15 '13 at 5:01

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