4

I spawn a telnet process to a host. I send a command, expect something in return. This goes on for a while. But somewhere in between this interaction, the connection to the host is lost mysteriously and my script dies while trying to "send" something to the spawned (now dead) telnet process. I'd like to write a procedure that takes the spawn id and the command to be sent as arguments. I'd like to check if the spawn id exists (i.e., the connection between the program and the host exists) before I "send" the command. Otherwise, I'd like to exit. Something like this:

proc Send {cmd sid} {
if { $sid is not dead yet } { ;## don't know how to do this
part
send -i $sid "$cmd\r"
} else {
puts "channel id: $sid does not exist anymore. Exiting"
exit
}
}
2

Rather than checking if the spawned process is still alive, you could catch the error that send raises when sending to a dead process:

proc Send {cmd sid} {
    if {[catch {send -i $sid "$cmd\r"} err]} {
        puts "error sending to $sid: $err"
        exit
    }
}
  • Yeah i am using the same catch and err method as of now. but here i don't want to come out .. if a spawn_id is not alive i would like to open a another telnet session again to the same server and then send the command. – Tanuj Apr 16 '13 at 4:51
  • @Tanuj Instead of a simple “complain and exit” you want to reconnect? So you replace the puts and exit in that code with a reconnect and then you try to send the command again. Except you've now got to change the outside world's knowledge of the sid too… it's starting to get very messy; looks like you've got an imperfect factoring of the interface. – Donal Fellows Apr 16 '13 at 5:49
  • Just an FYI: There is an extra "}" in the "if" statement above which results in 'args: should be "proc name args body"' error. StackOverflow, in it's infinite wisdom will not allow me to make a 1 character edit to the original answer. – functionvoid Dec 28 '17 at 14:51
1

I ran into this problem before and used the Mac/Linux ps command to do that:

if {[catch {exec ps $pid} std_out] == 0} { 
    puts "Alive"
} else {
    puts "It's dead, Jim"
}

If you are using Windows, I heard that the tlist.exe command does something similar, but I don't have a Windows machine to test it out.

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