6

Referring to the line with the comment:

  • Why does adding parenthesis in the example work to print all the contents of the array?

The example prints "one", then prints garbage.

#include <iostream>

int main() {
    const char* a[3] = { "one", "two", "three" };
    const char*(*p)[3] = &a;
    for(int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
        std::cout << *p[i] << std::endl; // this line
    }
    return 0;
}

It works after changing to this:

std::cout << (*p)[i] << std::endl;
20

p is a pointer to an array of 3 elements like this:

┌─────┬─────┬─────┐
│     │     │     │
└─────┴─────┴─────┘
   ^
   └─ p

Note that it points at the whole array, not a single element of it.

The expression *p[i] is treated as *(p[i]) due to operator precedence (which is equivalent to *(*(p + i))). This means that you are indexing the pointer to the array. If you do p[1], for example, you move the pointer along to the "next" array and attempt to dereference it:

┌─────┬─────┬─────┐
│     │     │     │
└─────┴─────┴─────┘
                     ^
                     └─ p + 1

As we can see, there is nothing there, and you'll get undefined behaviour. However, when you do (*p)[i] (equivalent to *((*p) + i)), you are making sure the dereference happens first. The dereference gives us the array itself, which can then be implicitly converted by array-to-pointer conversion to a pointer to the arrays first element. So what you get is:

┌─────┬─────┬─────┐
│     │     │     │
└─────┴─────┴─────┘
   ^
   └─ *p

In this case, the pointer is pointing at the array element and not the whole array. If you then index, for example, (*p)[1], you'll get:

┌─────┬─────┬─────┐
│     │     │     │
└─────┴─────┴─────┘
         ^
         └─ (*p) + 1

This gives you a valid const char* which can then be outputted by cout.

  • Great answer. I didn't realise that increasing i would try to dereference another whole array, though I was aware of operator precedence. I must be stuck in the mindset of an array being a pointer. – thelittlegumnut Apr 15 '13 at 11:07
6

Operator precedence.Without () operator [] will be called first and result of it will be dereferenced. With () - firstly will be dereference and then call to operator [].

2

Operator precedence.

The array selection have higher precedence than dereference, so from the compilers point of view it's really:

*(p[i])
1
        #include <iostream>
        using namespace std;       

        int main() {


            int arr[5] = {1,2,3,4,5};

            int *p=arr;


            int intgerSize=sizeof(int);


            for(int k=0;k<5;k++)


            {  
                cout<<"arr ["<<k<<"] "<<*(p+(k*sizeof(int)/intgerSize));  
                cout<<"  "<<(p+(k*sizeof(int)/intgerSize));
                cout<<"  "<<p+k<<"\n"; 

            }`enter code here`

            return 0;
        }
OUTPUT:- 
arr [0] 1 0x7ffd180f5800  0x7ffd180f5800
arr [1] 2 0x7ffd180f5804  0x7ffd180f5804
arr [2] 3 0x7ffd180f5808  0x7ffd180f5808
arr [3] 4 0x7ffd180f580c  0x7ffd180f580c
arr [4] 5 0x7ffd180f5810  0x7ffd180f5810
  • out put of above code – ankit gupta Sep 12 '17 at 17:42
  • Welcome to Stack Overflow, @ankitgupta. As questions and Answers are saved and serve as a resource to help not only the individual asking the question, it is useful to include an explanation of how/why this code addresses the questioner's issue. You can edit your answer to include additional information. You may want to review: stackoverflow.com/help/how-to-answer – Degan Sep 12 '17 at 18:18
  • Above code will help you to get an idea how compiler internally handle array. – ankit gupta Sep 14 '17 at 5:40

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