6

I'm having a problem with a program I'm writing, where my virtual functions don't seem to be behaving the way they should.

I have a class with a virtual function, and a derived class that overrides it. When I call the function, the override isn't called, but the base is. This is something I've done a million times before and I have no idea how that behaviour can break in such as simple case.

As an example:

public class ClassA
{
  public DoStuff()
  {
    MyVirtual()
  }

  protected virtual MyVirtual()
  {
    Console.WriteLine("Base MyVirtual Called");
  }
}

public class ClassB : ClassA
{
  protected override MyVirtual()
  {
    Console.WriteLine("Overridden MyVirtual Called");
  }
}

ClassA test = new ClassB;
test.DoStuff();

This example is just for effect (I haven't compiled it to check it, I'm just demonstrating). I just want to know what can break that so the override isn't called. I can't paste my specific code, but it is theoretically as simple as that.

  • The inheritance hierarchy is just the two classes
  • There's no sealed modifiers
  • The class is created via a simple call to new for the inherited class
  • The virtual function is protected and called from a public function in the base class just like that

How could that possibly break or what could interfere with that behaviour? The project is quite complicated, but this is nothing new that I'm implementing. In my specific code, there is even another virtual function written exactly the same way and inherited the same way, that works fine. I even made the new function by copy/pasting that one and renaming, so the syntax should be identical (I did rebuild them from scratch when they didn't work, but no difference to their behaviour).

Anyway, I'm at my wits end and I can't spend days searching for an obscure reason for this, so any ideas of where to start looking would be hugely appreciated.

6
  • 2
    nothing can't break it - the way you show in the example. I bet that your example doesn't represent the real problem you have. most likely your method is not virtual, or derived version is missing 'override' or something like that. Since the sample does not relate to the real code, you are effectively asking us to guess why some code we have never seen doesn't work Commented Apr 15, 2013 at 11:51
  • 1
    Cut down your non working code until you have a bit of code you can share. Is everything being compiled e.g. Is the base class in a separate project? is there an another class in a second project and your derived class in a third? Any function modifier changes will need all three recompiled. I'm not saying this is your problem, but there's a HUGE amount could be going on that we can't guess at without more information, and more importantly the code that isn't working. P.S. I guarantee that if you try to cut down your code to make a shareable sample then you'll find your problem. So go do it! Commented Apr 15, 2013 at 11:54
  • 1
    Poorly written example. DoStuff() is neither a constructor nor it has a return type.
    – user1162766
    Commented Apr 15, 2013 at 11:54
  • Are you 100% sure that the derived class has the virtual keyword for the method and the method is not being hidden/shadowed which would mean the base method is always called? I have never experienced anything like that unless I have forgotten to override but the compiler should warn of this. Commented Apr 15, 2013 at 11:54
  • 2
    My bet is that there is no override in derived class, but the sample says otherwise Commented Apr 15, 2013 at 11:55

2 Answers 2

10

If you fix the errors it compiles successfully and behaves as you would expect.

Fixed version:

public class ClassA
{
  public void DoStuff()
  {
    MyVirtual();
  }

  protected virtual void MyVirtual()
  {
    Console.WriteLine("Base MyVirtual Called");
  }
}

public class ClassB : ClassA
{
  protected override void MyVirtual()
  {
    Console.WriteLine("Overridden MyVirtual Called");
  }
}

ClassA test = new ClassB();
test.DoStuff();

Output:

Overridden MyVirtual Called

This basically means that, contrary to your statements, your code isn't "theoretically as simple as that", my guess is that you are not actually overriding in B class.

3
  • 2
    Ok. As mentioned, the example was just to show the problem and I hadn't compiled it (so I would have picked up on those errors if I had, and they aren't present in the project I'm working on). I've tracked down the problem and it was my own stupidity and lack of sleep. It has nothing to do with the virtual functions, but in my project there is a check against a boolean as to whether to even call the function and the copy paste was of a static bool without my noticing. A bit more digging and I would have realised that and not posted a stupid question. Sorry all. Commented Apr 15, 2013 at 13:38
  • 3
    "Incredibly poorly written" Alright there over-exaggerator. The only thing you changed was "protected virtual" to "protected virtual void", and you added a missing semicolon. A rational person would have noticed names like "ClassA, ClassB, DoStuff" and realized OP didn't copy/paste code, and clearly just had a few typos.
    – MEE
    Commented Mar 1, 2020 at 17:25
  • 2
    @MEE you're right. I apologize to SurvivalistDev and all of you. I was indeed exaggerating and rude. I honestly don't know if I woke up on the wrong side of the bed but that is no excuse. I'm sorry.
    – user1162766
    Commented Mar 3, 2020 at 3:40
0

If you have several classes in the inheritance chain, you may want to check that all the methods with the same name in those classes (if they exist) have "override"

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.