97

I've a SQL query that queries an enormous (as in, hundreds of views/tables with hard-to-read names like CMM-CPP-FAP-ADD) database that I don't need nor want to understand. The result of this query needs to be stored in a staging table to feed a report.

I need to create the staging table, but with hundreds of views/tables to dig through to find the data types that are being represented here, I have to wonder if there's a better way to construct this table.

Can anyone advise how I would use any of the SQL Server 2008 tools to divine the source data types in my SQL 2000 database?

As a general example, I want to know from a query like:

SELECT Auth_First_Name, Auth_Last_Name, Auth_Favorite_Number 
FROM Authors

Instead of the actual results, I want to know that:

Auth_First_Name is char(25)
Auth_Last_Name is char(50)
Auth_Favorite_Number is int

I'm not interested in constraints, I really just want to know the data types.

0

13 Answers 13

82

For SQL Server 2012 and above: If you place the query into a string then you can get the result set data types like so:

DECLARE @query nvarchar(max) = 'select 12.1 / 10.1 AS [Column1]';
EXEC sp_describe_first_result_set @query, null, 0;  
2
  • 2
    Great answer! Where can I learn another useful sp_ procedures like this? Mar 18, 2020 at 14:42
  • 2
    This is GOLD for Determining the Datatype of AdHoc Scripted Columns! Before, I was using Select-Into and then studying the new Table Schema that was created. This is much faster!
    – MikeTeeVee
    Jul 6, 2020 at 16:23
72
select * from information_schema.columns

could get you started.

4
  • 5
    Do you have a CASE SENSITIVE database? If so, you must use SELECT * FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.Columns
    – Raj More
    Oct 21, 2009 at 15:55
  • 2
    Yes, it is case sensitive. I tried SELECT * FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.Columns and get the same invalid object error. This is SQL Server 2000 (8.0.2055), does INFORMATION_SCHEMA exist in this version?
    – JMP
    Oct 21, 2009 at 16:00
  • 5
    ok nvm, I tried SELECT * FROM [databasename].INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUNMS and I'm getting somewhere. Thanks for being patient with me on this!
    – JMP
    Oct 21, 2009 at 16:01
  • 3
    This doesn't help if you're actually trying to select the data types returned in a query - this only evaluates the static table definition. See @redcalx's answer below for an actual solution when fed an arbitrary query.
    – bsplosion
    Apr 28, 2020 at 19:42
38

You could also insert the results (or top 10 results) into a temp table and get the columns from the temp table (as long as the column names are all different).

SELECT TOP 10 *
INTO #TempTable
FROM <DataSource>

Then use:

EXEC tempdb.dbo.sp_help N'#TempTable';

or

SELECT * 
FROM tempdb.sys.columns 
WHERE [object_id] = OBJECT_ID(N'tempdb..#TempTable');

Extrapolated from Aaron's answer here.

33

You can also use...

SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY()

...in cases where you don't have direct access to the metadata (e.g. a linked server query perhaps?).

In SQL Server 2005 and beyond you are better off using the catalog views (sys.columns) as opposed to INFORMATION_SCHEMA. Unless portability to other platforms is important. Just keep in mind that the INFORMATION_SCHEMA views won't change and so they will progressively be lacking information on new features etc. in successive versions of SQL Server.

2
  • This will not work for text fields. Will throw this exception: "Operand type clash: text is incompatible with sql_variant"
    – eflles
    Jul 5, 2017 at 5:49
  • 3
    @eflles Thanks, remember this is an exceptional case (when you don't have access to the metadata) and, even in 2009 when this question came up, you should have abandoned text, ntext, and image. If people are still using those today, this is but a small part of their problems... Jul 5, 2017 at 12:35
26

There MUST be en easier way to do this... Low and behold, there is...!

"sp_describe_first_result_set" is your friend!

Now I do realise the question was asked specifically for SQL Server 2000, but I was looking for a similar solution for later versions and discovered some native support in SQL to achieve this.

In SQL Server 2012 onwards cf. "sp_describe_first_result_set" - Link to BOL

I had already implemented a solution using a technique similar to @Trisped's above and ripped it out to implement the native SQL Server implementation.

In case you're not on SQL Server 2012 or Azure SQL Database yet, here's the stored proc I created for pre-2012 era databases:

CREATE PROCEDURE [fn].[GetQueryResultMetadata] 
    @queryText VARCHAR(MAX)
AS
BEGIN

    -- SET NOCOUNT ON added to prevent extra result sets from
    -- interfering with SELECT statements.
    --SET NOCOUNT ON;

    PRINT @queryText;

    DECLARE
                @sqlToExec NVARCHAR(MAX) = 
                    'SELECT TOP 1 * INTO #QueryMetadata FROM ('
                    +
                    @queryText
                    +
                    ') T;'
                    + '
                        SELECT
                                    C.Name                          [ColumnName],
                                    TP.Name                         [ColumnType],
                                    C.max_length                    [MaxLength],
                                    C.[precision]                   [Precision],
                                    C.[scale]                       [Scale],
                                    C.[is_nullable]                 IsNullable
                        FROM
                                    tempdb.sys.columns              C
                                        INNER JOIN
                                    tempdb.sys.types                TP
                                                                                ON
                                                                                        TP.system_type_id = C.system_type_id
                                                                                            AND
                                                                                        -- exclude custom types
                                                                                        TP.system_type_id = TP.user_type_id
                        WHERE
                                    [object_id] = OBJECT_ID(N''tempdb..#QueryMetadata'');
            '

    EXEC sp_executesql @sqlToExec

END
0
15
SELECT COLUMN_NAME,
       DATA_TYPE,
       CHARACTER_MAXIMUM_LENGTH
FROM information_schema.columns
WHERE TABLE_NAME = 'YOUR_TABLE_NAME'

You can use columns aliases for better looking output.

6

Can you get away with recreating the staging table from scratch every time the query is executed? If so you could use SELECT ... INTO syntax and let SQL Server worry about creating the table using the correct column types etc.

SELECT *
INTO your_staging_table
FROM enormous_collection_of_views_tables_etc
3
  • He could also create that staging table just to get the columns data types, using the information_schema table pointed by erikkallen.
    – Spidey
    Oct 21, 2009 at 15:54
  • 6
    @JM: How about running the SELECT ... INTO ... FROM ... WHERE 1=0 syntax as a one-off to create a dummy table, and then use Management Studio to script the table creation SQL for the dummy table?
    – LukeH
    Oct 21, 2009 at 16:03
  • This is very helpful when the data source is a table value function, in which case you can not use information_schema.columns. Thanks
    – lastr2d2
    Mar 10, 2014 at 6:00
5

This will give you everything column property related.

SELECT * INTO TMP1
FROM ( SELECT TOP 1 /* rest of your query expression here */ );

SELECT o.name AS obj_name, TYPE_NAME(c.user_type_id) AS type_name, c.*  
FROM sys.objects AS o   
JOIN sys.columns AS c  ON o.object_id = c.object_id  
WHERE o.name = 'TMP1';

DROP TABLE TMP1;
1
  • This is by far the most concise answer to the original question.
    – roblem
    Jul 8, 2019 at 19:36
2
select COLUMN_NAME, DATA_TYPE, CHARACTER_MAXIMUM_LENGTH 
from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS 
where TABLE_NAME='yourTable';
1
  • This is a perfect solution to visualize the max len too (e.g. VarChar len)
    – Dos
    Jun 8, 2022 at 12:24
2

sp_describe_first_result_set

will help to identify the datatypes of query by analyzing datatypes of first resultset of query

https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/relational-databases/system-stored-procedures/sp-describe-first-result-set-transact-sql?view=sql-server-2017

1
  • This isn't a valid answer because OP specifically stated that they have a SQL 2000 database. This procedure wasn't introduced until 2012.
    – Jeremy
    Jan 20, 2020 at 17:48
2

I use a simple case statement to render results I can use in technical specification documents. This example does not contain every condition you will run into with a database, but it gives you a good template to work with.

SELECT
     TABLE_NAME          AS 'Table Name',
     COLUMN_NAME         AS 'Column Name',
     CASE WHEN DATA_TYPE LIKE '%char'
          THEN DATA_TYPE + '(' + CONVERT(VARCHAR, CHARACTER_MAXIMUM_LENGTH) + ')'
          WHEN DATA_TYPE IN ('bit', 'int', 'smallint', 'date')
          THEN DATA_TYPE
          WHEN DATA_TYPE = 'datetime'
          THEN DATA_TYPE + '(' + CONVERT(VARCHAR, DATETIME_PRECISION) + ')'
          WHEN DATA_TYPE = 'float'
          THEN DATA_TYPE
          WHEN DATA_TYPE IN ('numeric', 'money')
          THEN DATA_TYPE + '(' + CONVERT(VARCHAR, NUMERIC_PRECISION) + ', ' + CONVERT(VARCHAR, NUMERIC_PRECISION_RADIX) + ')'
     END                 AS 'Data Type',
     CASE WHEN IS_NULLABLE = 'NO'
          THEN 'NOT NULL'
          ELSE 'NULL'
     END                 AS 'PK/LK/NOT NULL'
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS 
ORDER BY 
     TABLE_NAME, ORDINAL_POSITION
2

Checking data types. The first way to check data types for SQL Server database is a query with the SYS schema table. The below query uses COLUMNS and TYPES tables:

    SELECT C.NAME AS COLUMN_NAME,
       TYPE_NAME(C.USER_TYPE_ID) AS DATA_TYPE,
       C.IS_NULLABLE,
       C.MAX_LENGTH,
       C.PRECISION,
       C.SCALE
FROM SYS.COLUMNS C
JOIN SYS.TYPES T
     ON C.USER_TYPE_ID=T.USER_TYPE_ID
WHERE C.OBJECT_ID=OBJECT_ID('your_table_name');

In this way, you can find data types of columns.

0

This easy query return a data type bit. You can use this thecnic for other data types:

select CAST(0 AS BIT) AS OK

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