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I've been working for a while on a project hosted in GitHub. However, I've now decided I want to rewrite my application a different way, and have started from scratch. I renamed my old local repository and have created a new one.

How do I use the new repository to replace the repository hosted on GitHub? I don't really care if my old history and issues are there or not. Would the best way just be to delete the GitHub repository and create a new one?

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  • I think there is a .git folder that you can delete; then start over with git init
    – bozdoz
    Commented Apr 15, 2013 at 15:15
  • Doesn't actually "start over". All the existing forks of the project will still be there, as well as any other branches, and any issues, and any wiki entries.
    – user229044
    Commented Apr 15, 2013 at 15:17
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    The answer for "git" is very different than the answer for "GitHub". Which one do you want?
    – user229044
    Commented Apr 15, 2013 at 15:20
  • @meagar I have a project hosted on GitHub that I've been working on for a while. I recently decided to restart with a new approach to the project, so on my computer I have a new folder with new work, in no way connected with the old git repository, either locally or on GitHub. I basically want a way to get my new work into my GitHub repository.
    – iBelieve
    Commented Apr 15, 2013 at 15:24
  • Does this answer your question? How to restart git repo?
    – Vega
    Commented Jul 28, 2022 at 9:09

2 Answers 2

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Rename the existing GitHub repository and create a new one with the old name. You'll have the history of the old one and the links pointing to the new one. It'll confuse some, but it will have the desired effect.

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  • Much better answer. You can then delete the renamed project if you really don't want the old issues/branches/forks tracked.
    – user229044
    Commented Apr 15, 2013 at 15:20
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Just create your new files and force commit them to your master branch:

git push -f origin master

If you don't have your repository created in your current directory just start the repository clean:

git init
git remote add origin <repository git URL>
git push -f origin master

As @meagar points out in the comments below; don't do this if you care about your forks, history or previous codebase.

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  • This is a bad idea. Anybody whose forked his repo is going to break things hilariously the next time they pull, merge, and push. Never mind that all his other branches will still be there, as well as his old issues. This is really quite far from actually "starting over".
    – user229044
    Commented Apr 15, 2013 at 15:16
  • depends on whether he has forkers ;)
    – Luceos
    Commented Apr 15, 2013 at 15:17
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    It shouldn't. The point of this site is to provide useful answers to everybody with the same question, not this one specific instance. In the general case, this is bad advice.
    – user229044
    Commented Apr 15, 2013 at 15:18
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    I've used this in the past; not because I had to reset my repository, but to upload a version which was way different. I had no forkers, okay; but it helped me out anyway. So even if it might not be useful to you, it might be useful to others looking for a solution that matched mine.
    – Luceos
    Commented Apr 15, 2013 at 16:09
  • This is useful for failing fast and cutting bait. Cheers.
    – Kickaha
    Commented Aug 29, 2017 at 22:45

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