17

I was searching for a way to find the size of an array in C without using sizeof and I found the following code:

int main ()
{
    int arr[100];
    printf ("%d\n", (&arr)[1] - arr);
    return 0;
}

Can anyone please explain to me how is it working?

6
  • 4
    There is never a reason why you can't use sizeof. – Lundin Apr 15 '13 at 15:31
  • It seems that the array, which has 100 elements is actually treated as item 0 of an (unnamed) array. – enhzflep Apr 15 '13 at 15:32
  • Nice trick, it's also standard compliant. – effeffe Apr 15 '13 at 15:45
  • @effeffe: maybe, but see Daniel's comments below. I don't think it is standard compliant, although I can't think of a good reason for it not to work in practice. The subtraction, I mean -- the use of %d is certainly not strictly conforming and in fact would fail on a fairly normal-looking big-endian implementation with a 32 bit int and a 64 bit ptrdiff_t. – Steve Jessop Apr 15 '13 at 16:09
  • @SteveJessop actually you're right, it could be not standard compliant, let's follow that discussion there. However, I agree that it should work, but the standard can't let us dereference a pointer that doesn't actually point to an object or a part of it, that makes sense. – effeffe Apr 15 '13 at 18:01
25

&arr is a pointer to an array of 100 ints.

The [1] means "add the size of the thing that is pointed to", which is an array of 100 ints.

So the difference between (&arr)[1] and arr is 100 ints.

(Note that this trick will only work in places where sizeof would have worked anyway.)

1
  • 9
    [1] doesn't mean "add the size of the thing that is pointed to". It means "add the size of the thing that is pointed to and then dereference the resultant pointer". – Alexey Frunze Apr 15 '13 at 15:54
12

&arr gives you a pointer to the array. (&arr)[1] is equivalent to *(&arr + 1). &arr + 1 gives you a pointer to the array of 100 ints that follows arr. Dereferencing it with * gives you that array that follows. Since this array is used in an additive expression (-), it decays to the pointer to its first element. The same happens to arr in the expression. So you subtract to pointers, one pointing to the non-existent element right after arr and the other pointing to the first element of arr. This gives you 100.

But it's not working. %d is used for int. Pointer difference returns you ptrdiff_t and not int. You need to use %td for ptrdiff_t. If you lie to printf() about the types of the parameters you're passing to it, you get well-deserved undefined behavior.

EDIT: (&arr)[1] may cause undefined behavior. It's not entirely clear. See the comments below, if interested.

15
  • 3
    Isn't (&arr)[1] - arr also undefined behaviour? – Daniel Fischer Apr 15 '13 at 15:45
  • 2
    @DanielFischer C99: Additive operators: For the purposes of these operators, a pointer to an object that is not an element of an array behaves the same as a pointer to the first element of an array of length one with the type of the object as its element type. So, it looks like this is OK. I mean the [1] part. And the rest is as usual. – Alexey Frunze Apr 15 '13 at 15:50
  • 1
    But the last sentence in paragraph 8 of that is "If the result points one past the last element of the array object, it shall not be used as the operand of a unary * operator that is evaluated." And (&arr)[1] evaluates the * in *(&arr + 1), if I understand correctly. It's okay if you take the address, of (&arr)[1], or apply sizeof to it, that doesn't evaluate the *, but with -? – Daniel Fischer Apr 15 '13 at 15:55
  • @DanielFischer: The standard says that &* is a no-op even if dereferencing would be UB (6.5.3.2/3 in C99). In the same spirit we might expect that to apply with decay-to-pointer in the place of &, but I think you're correct that this is not guaranteed in the standard. – Steve Jessop Apr 15 '13 at 16:03
  • 3
    @AlexeyFrunze But we don't have *(&E), we have *(&E + 1). – Daniel Fischer Apr 15 '13 at 16:06
1

Generally (as per visual studio), for an array &arr is same as arr ,which return the starting base address of our function.

(&arr)[0] is nothing but &arr or arr

ex: it will return some address : 1638116

Now, (&arr)[1] means we are started accessing the array out of bounce means next array or next segment of the size of present array(100 ahead).

ex: it will return some address : 1638216

Now, subtracting (&arr)[1] - (&arr)[0]=100

1
  • "(&arr)[0] is nothing but &arr or arr" -- arr and &arr have different types when though both point to the same location. The former is of type int* while the latter is of type int(*)[100]. – Spikatrix Oct 5 '15 at 11:18
0

&variable gives location of the variable (call it as P)
&variable + 1 gives address of the location next to the variable. (call it as N)

(char*)N-(char*)P gives how many characters are there between N and P. Since each character is 1 byte sized, so the above result gives the number of bytes P and N. (which equals to the size of array in bytes).

Similarly, (char*) (a+1)-(char*)a; gives size of each element of the array in bytes.

So the number of elements in the array = (size of array in bytes)/(size of each element in the array in bytes)

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int a[100];
    int b = ((char*)(&a+1)-(char*)(&a));
    int c = (char*) (a+1)-(char*)a;
    b = b/c;
    printf("The size of array should be %d",b);
    return 0;

}
0

int arry[6]={1,2,3,4,5,6} //lets array elements be 6, so... size in byte = (char*)(arry+6)-(char *)(arry)=24;

1
  • 1
    OP asked to explain how his example is working. You gave another example. That's not an answer to OP's question. – Adrian W Jun 29 '18 at 20:03
-2
int main ()
{
  int arr[100];
  printf ("%d\n", ((char*)(&arr+1) - (char*)(&arr))/((char*) (arr+1) -(char*) (arr)));
  return 0;
}
2
  • 2
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding why and/or how this code answers the question improves its long-term value. – JAL Oct 4 '15 at 23:05
  • I'll be happy to upvote your answer if you add some explanation about how your code works. BTW, you should use %ld, not %d. – Spikatrix Oct 5 '15 at 11:43

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