0

EDIT: My last question is how do I get a space before the number I put and then put a . at the end of the sentence?

Original Question:

I am learning C++. This is my code

#include <iostream>

int main() {
    int iNum;
    std::cout << "Please enter your favorite number" << std::endl;
    std::cin >> iNum;
    std::cout << "Your favorite number is" << std::cout << iNum << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

I removed the spaces to make it easier to read. I expect the output to be Your favorite number is 4 if I were to enter a 4 when asked. Instead it says, Your favorite number is51ABC3E84. The last number will always be whatever number I pick. What am I messing up to get the weird output? Thanks for the help for a very noob programmer.

  • 4
    Why is the std::cout in there (it's convertible to a void * in 03, even if most C++11 compilers now don't have that changed yet)? – chris Apr 15 '13 at 17:58
  • 1
    Try this std::cout << "Your favorite number is" << iNum << std::endl; – juanchopanza Apr 15 '13 at 17:59
  • 1
    Now try this std::cout << "Your favorite number is " << iNum << "." << std::endl; – juanchopanza Apr 15 '13 at 18:05
  • BTW I posted comments only because I am not actually explaining anything, just giving you a solution. I hope you can figure out what is going on from the solution, but in my mind this doesn't constitute a good answer. – juanchopanza Apr 15 '13 at 18:22
  • Hey I figured as much juanchopanza. I picked an answer down below that explained what you said. Thanks still. – Chris Apr 15 '13 at 18:25
4

Remove the second std::cout after you retrieved input, that serves no purpose in your program.

The corrected line should be: (updated to reflect updated parts of question)

std::cout << "Your favorite number is " << iNum << "." << std::endl;

When you send std::cout into the stream, you're actually having the std::cout object try to process itself as something to be printed. In this case, it seems to be interpreting it as a 32-bit value (probably the memory location of std::cout) represented in hex. The "4" at the end of "51ABC3E8" in your output is the value of the variable taken from input.

  • 1
    Thank you for explaining why what juanchopanza said actually solved the problem. This is a huge help. I'm glad that there is such a helpful community here to learn from, and with such quick answers no less. – Chris Apr 15 '13 at 18:18
3
 std::cout << "Your favorite number is" << std::cout << iNum << std::endl;
                                        //^^You are printing cout

should be

std::cout << "Your favorite number is"  << iNum << std::endl;
0

You only need to say std::cout once. After the initial cout, you just chain all the output you want with << until the statement ends in a ;. When you put it behind << as in your code, you're actually printing cout as converted to a void*.

std::cout << "Your favorite number is" << iNum << std::endl; ought to do the trick for you.

EDIT: If you want a space and period, just put them in your output line:

std::cout << "Your favorite number is " << iNum << '.' << std::endl;

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