11

Can I copy a C++ object to the device?

say I have:

class CudaClass
{
public:
int* data;
CudaClass(int x) {
    data = new int[1]; data[0] = x;
}
};

__global__ void useClass(CudaClass cudaClass)
{
    printf("%d" cudaClass.data[0]);
};


int main()
{
    CudaClass c(1);
}

Now how do I copy "c" to device memory and launch kernel "useClass"?

18

Yes, you can copy an object to the device for use on the device. When the object has embedded pointers to dynamically allocated regions, the process requires some extra steps.

See my answer here for a discussion of what is involved. That answer also has a few samples code answers linked to it.

Also, in your class definition, if you want certain functions to be usable on the device, you should decorate those functions appropriately (i.e. probably with __device__ __host__);

EDIT: In response to a question (now deleted) here is the simplest sample code I could come up with based on the supplied code:

#include <stdio.h>

class CudaClass
{
public:
int* data;
CudaClass(int x) {
    data = new int[1]; data[0] = x;
}
};

__global__ void useClass(CudaClass *cudaClass)
{
    printf("%d\n", cudaClass->data[0]);
};




int main()
{
    CudaClass c(1);
    // create class storage on device and copy top level class
    CudaClass *d_c;
    cudaMalloc((void **)&d_c, sizeof(CudaClass));
    cudaMemcpy(d_c, &c, sizeof(CudaClass), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
    // make an allocated region on device for use by pointer in class
    int *hostdata;
    cudaMalloc((void **)&hostdata, sizeof(int));
    cudaMemcpy(hostdata, c.data, sizeof(int), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
    // copy pointer to allocated device storage to device class
    cudaMemcpy(&(d_c->data), &hostdata, sizeof(int *), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
    useClass<<<1,1>>>(d_c);
    cudaDeviceSynchronize();
    return 0;
}

In the interest of brevity/clarity I have dispensed with the usual cuda error checking.

Responding to the question, you cannot allocate storage directly from the host using the pointer in the device-based class. This is because cudaMalloc expects an ordinary host based pointer storage, such as what you get with:

int *hostdata;

cudaMalloc cannot work with a pointer whose storage is already on the device. This will not work:

cudaMalloc(&(d_c->data), sizeof(int));

because it requires dereferencing a device pointer (d_c) in host code, which is not allowed.

  • ok just one more question: WHat I see is that you allocate some memory on the device, then copy the pointer value to the array inside the object. Why can't I allocate for myobject.array directly instead of using a "middle" variable to hold the data and copy its pointer into myobject.array? – SpaceMonkey Apr 15 '13 at 22:01
  • Responded to this question with an edit to my answer. I believe I've already addressed this question as well in questions posted after one of the linked answers. – Robert Crovella Apr 15 '13 at 23:26
  • Thank you so much, very clear answer ! One more question if I may: Why can't I do CudaMalloc((void**)&data, 100*sizeof(int)) In the constructor instead of data = new int[100] ? I thought that should allocate on the device directly instead of on the host then copy to device. Cheers – SpaceMonkey Apr 16 '13 at 9:29
  • 4
    hostdata contains a pointer to device memory. But &hostdata is a pointer to a location in host memory. So no, that pointer is not "on the device" and it does not point to a location "on the device". &hostdata points to a location in host memory. hostdata points to a location in device memory. – Robert Crovella Jun 14 '14 at 5:21
  • 1
    For this trivially simple class in this problem, the only thing necessary would be to reverse the cudaMemcpy operation that copies the actual data, so, after the kernel, something like: cudaMemcpy(c.data, hostdata, sizeof(int), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);. A more complicated object would probably require several steps. Since a direct copy of the object itself from device back to host would invalidate the embedded pointers in the object, you would need a way to preserve or "fixup" these pointers, much the same way this answer demonstrates "fixing up" the embedded pointers in the device object. – Robert Crovella Jul 27 '18 at 19:46

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