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At http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/atomic/atomic_compare_exchange, the following example code is presented as an example use of std::atomic_compare_exchange_weak:

void append(list* s, node* n)
{
    node* head;
    do {
        head = s->head;
        n->next = head;
    } while(! std::atomic_compare_exchange_weak(s->head, head, n));
}

My understanding is that this has the the effect of comparing *(s->head) with head, when what I believe is desired is to compare s->head with head. Should the first argument to std::atomic_compare_exchange_weak in this example be &(s->head), or am I missing something?

UPDATE: The spec for std::atomic_compare_exchange_weak says:

bool atomic_compare_exchange_weak(volatile A* object, C * expected, C desired) noexcept;
bool atomic_compare_exchange_weak(A* object, C * expected, C desired) noexcept;

Effects: Atomically, compares the contents of the memory pointed to by object...for equality with that in expected...

I took this to mean that *object was compared with expected, but further research suggests that the actual meaning is that *object is compared with *expected (i.e., that "in expected" means "pointed to by expected"). This would imply that the answer to my original question is "no, there is no need to take the address of s->head in the example code at cppreference". But the fact that object must point to a std::atomic<T> and expected must point to a T makes it hard for me to figure out how to correct the code at cppreference so that it will compile. We want to compare the head of the list with a copy of the head of the list, but if the head of the list is of type std::atomic<T>*, the copy would have to be of type T* if the call to std::atomic_compare_exchange_weak is to compile, and I can't find a way to assign a std::atomic<T>* to a T* without a reinterpret_cast. Even then, the third parameter to std::atomic_compare_exchange_weak would need to be of type T, but the example at cppreference shows both the second and third parameters to be of the same type. This suggests to me that the example at cppreference is broken. I tried to fix it, but I was stymied by the need to use a reinterpret_cast that just feels wrong.

Interestingly, in my attempts to figure this stuff out, I checked out the msdn page for std::atomic_compare_exchange_weak, and I was dismayed to see that that page displays the prototypes for std::atomic_compare_exchange_*strong*!

Can somebody post plausible code that uses std::atomic_compare_exchange_weak to insert a node at the front of a singly-linked list? There's no need to worry about the ABA problem or do anything fancy. I'd just like to see skeletal code that compiles.

5
  • 1
    Is node supposed to be an atomic object?
    – David G
    Apr 16, 2013 at 1:26
  • That's the complete code snippet from cppreference, but I don't think it affects the answer to my question. Apr 16, 2013 at 1:40
  • 3
    The code is nonsense. The first argument to atomic_compare_exchange_weak should be a pointer to an object of an atomic type; the second argument should be a pointer to an object of the corresponding value type; the third argument is an object (not a pointer) of the corresponding value type. Apr 16, 2013 at 11:39
  • As to the MSDN problem, the signatures of atomic_compare_exchange_weak and atomic_compare_exchange_strong are the same; only the name is different. So this is just a cut-and-paste error, a common occurrence in the atomics stuff, since so much of it looks alike. That aside, the documentation is correct. Apr 16, 2013 at 11:41
  • 1
    I removed the example for now (it's a wiki, after all), since, indeed, it was wrong.
    – Cubbi
    Apr 16, 2013 at 16:40

1 Answer 1

2

A correct example would be:

struct list {
    std::atomic<node*> head;
};

...

void append(list* s, node* n)
{
    node* head;
    do {
        head = s->head;
        n->next = head;
    } while (!std::atomic_compare_exchange_weak(&(s->head), &head, n));
    // or while (!s->head.compare_exchange_weak(head, n));
}

The list::head would need to be a std::atomic object, unless you want to deal with undefined behavior. The platform in question might need some or all of the std::atomic stuff to be implemented using locks. Therefore, std::atomic<T*> might include additional members and reinterpret_cast<std::atomic<T*>*> would be the case where UB means that your program crashes.

1
  • This compiles, once the appropriate skeleton is built around it. A compilable example is available at IDEOne. I did not test the sample code to make sure it works, but at least it compiles. Apr 29, 2013 at 22:38

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