Last night I had dream that the following was impossible. But in the same dream, someone from SO told me otherwise. Hence I would like to know if it it possible to convert System.Array to List

Array ints = Array.CreateInstance(typeof(int), 5);
ints.SetValue(10, 0);
ints.SetValue(20, 1);
ints.SetValue(10, 2);
ints.SetValue(34, 3);
ints.SetValue(113, 4);

to

List<int> lst = ints.OfType<int>(); // not working
  • 2
    Below link show how it does in c# codegateway.com/2011/12/… – user1240789 Feb 29 '12 at 17:00
  • 3
    You have to cast the Array to what it actually is, an int[], then you can use ToList: ((int[])ints).ToList(); – Tim Schmelter Dec 4 '15 at 16:39

10 Answers 10

up vote 327 down vote accepted

Save yourself some pain...

using System.Linq;

int[] ints = new [] { 10, 20, 10, 34, 113 };

List<int> lst = ints.OfType<int>().ToList(); // this isn't going to be fast.

Can also just...

List<int> lst = new List<int> { 10, 20, 10, 34, 113 };

or...

List<int> lst = new List<int>();
lst.Add(10);
lst.Add(20);
lst.Add(10);
lst.Add(34);
lst.Add(113);

or...

List<int> lst = new List<int>(new int[] { 10, 20, 10, 34, 113 });

or...

var lst = new List<int>();
lst.AddRange(new int[] { 10, 20, 10, 34, 113 });
  • 13
    Note for completeness: the 2nd method is only available in C# 3.0+. – Jon Seigel Oct 21 '09 at 20:17
  • 14
    Since the int array already implements IEnumerable<int>, the OfType<int>() is not required. ints.ToList(); suffices. – Heinzi Feb 29 '12 at 17:06
  • 14
    For OfType, you need System.Linq – JasonPlutext Jul 27 '12 at 3:18
  • 2
    @kenny made some tweaks, the first method here, is definitely not the quickest way to do this. – Dave Mar 17 '14 at 14:50
  • 7
    None of these examples actually answer the actual question. But I guess he accepted the answer so he was happy. Still, not one of these actually convert an Array to a List. "Conversion of System.Array to List". Should add that example for completeness IMO. (Being top answer and all) – Søren Ullidtz Jan 22 '15 at 8:14

There is also a constructor overload for List that will work... But I guess this would required a strong typed array.

//public List(IEnumerable<T> collection)
var intArray = new[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
var list = new List<int>(intArray);

... for Array class

var intArray = Array.CreateInstance(typeof(int), 5);
for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    intArray.SetValue(i, i);
var list = new List<int>((int[])intArray);
  • Between this approach and the one using ToList(), which is more efficient? Or is there a difference? – Ben Sutton Jul 4 '12 at 4:27
  • 1
    Hard to say without knowing the real dataset size (List internally uses arrays that must be able to expand. Arrays are immutable.) If you know the List size upfront this way could improve performance slightly… but the gain is going to be so small you may as well use the version you prefer to maintain. – Matthew Whited Jul 5 '12 at 12:32
  • 2
    Have you noticed this thread is 6 years old? (And my second answer directly handles his example of using Array instead of int[].) – Matthew Whited Dec 4 '15 at 16:40

Interestingly no one answers the question, OP isn't using a strongly typed int[] but an Array.

You have to cast the Array to what it actually is, an int[], then you can use ToList:

List<int> intList = ((int[])ints).ToList();

Note that Enumerable.ToList calls the list constructor that first checks if the argument can be casted to ICollection<T>(which an array implements), then it will use the more efficient ICollection<T>.CopyTo method instead of enumerating the sequence.

  • 5
    Thank you, Enum.GetValues returns an Array and this helped me out making a list out of it. – modiX Aug 28 '16 at 20:57
  • 2
    I know this is old but you are right, the question is answer by this. In my situation a dynamic deserializer returns a system array because it has to be prepared to accept any kind of data type so you can't preload the list until runtime. Thank you – Frank Cedeno May 2 '17 at 14:21
  • This is the correct answer to the question. – ThisGuy Jan 27 at 1:31

The simplest method is:

int[] ints = new [] { 10, 20, 10, 34, 113 };

List<int> lst = ints.ToList();

or

List<int> lst = new List<int>();
lst.AddRange(ints);
  • 3
    One needs using System.Linq; for ToList() to work. – Jarekczek Jan 7 at 14:41

in vb.net just do this

mylist.addrange(intsArray)

or

Dim mylist As New List(Of Integer)(intsArray)
  • 1
    much better than using OfType<> (my VS2010 would not accept anything OfType...) – woohoo Apr 18 '12 at 20:55

In the case you want to return an array of enums as a list you can do the following.

using System.Linq;

public List<DayOfWeek> DaysOfWeek
{
  get
  {
    return Enum.GetValues(typeof(DayOfWeek))
               .OfType<DayOfWeek>()
               .ToList();
  }
}

Just use the existing method.. .ToList();

   List<int> listArray = array.ToList();

KISS(KEEP IT SIMPLE SIR)

You can do like this basically:

int[] ints = new[] { 10, 20, 10, 34, 113 };

this is your array, and than you can call your new list like this:

 var newList = new List<int>(ints);

You can do this for complex object too.

You can just give it try to your code:

Array ints = Array.CreateInstance(typeof(int), 5);
ints.SetValue(10, 0);

ints.SetValue(20, 1);
ints.SetValue(10, 2);
ints.SetValue(34, 3);
ints.SetValue(113, 4);

int[] anyVariable=(int[])ints;

Then you can just use the anyVariable as your code.

I hope this is helpful.

enum TESTENUM
    {
        T1 = 0,
        T2 = 1,
        T3 = 2,
        T4 = 3
    }

get string value

string enumValueString = "T1";

        List<string> stringValueList =  typeof(TESTENUM).GetEnumValues().Cast<object>().Select(m => 
            Convert.ToString(m)
            ).ToList();

        if(!stringValueList.Exists(m => m == enumValueString))
        {
            throw new Exception("cannot find type");
        }

        TESTENUM testEnumValueConvertString;
        Enum.TryParse<TESTENUM>(enumValueString, out testEnumValueConvertString);

get integer value

        int enumValueInt = 1;

        List<int> enumValueIntList =  typeof(TESTENUM).GetEnumValues().Cast<object>().Select(m =>
            Convert.ToInt32(m)
            ).ToList();

        if(!enumValueIntList.Exists(m => m == enumValueInt))
        {
            throw new Exception("cannot find type");
        }

        TESTENUM testEnumValueConvertInt;
        Enum.TryParse<TESTENUM>(enumValueString, out testEnumValueConvertInt);

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