3

I need to reset some global hash variables in a mod_perl script.

This works - as described e.g. here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/4090870

$_ = '' for ($a, $b, $c);
$_ = 0 for ($d, $e, $f);

This doesn't seem to work:

$_ = () for (%a, %b, %c);

Why doesn't it work with hashes? Can it be done? What about with arrays?

(I do normally try to scope variables so the above is not necessary, but in this case, I am afraid it will have to be like this. Also, I may be missing some basic understanding of how for...each loops work in Perl, please enlighten me.)

4

You could do it with references:

%$_ = () for (\%a, \%b, \%c);

but this does not answer your question as to why it doesn't work without references:

When putting a hash into your for (%h)-statement the hash is evaluated implicitly in list context.

(EDIT: I was initially said scalar context and realized later it is list context and adapted the answer)

  • Thank you, I was expecting something like that. Can you confirm that this approach would also work with arrays, as in @{$_} = () for (\@a, \@b, \@c) – W3Coder Apr 16 '13 at 9:44
  • 4
    You can even simplify it a bit to %$_ = () for \(%a, %b, %c); – choroba Apr 16 '13 at 9:45
  • 1
    @choroba thanks for the hint. Whether it is a simplification, I think, depends on the reader. :-) – Patrick B. Apr 16 '13 at 9:47
3

You're doing more work than you have to. There is no need to loop over the variables.

$_ = '' for ($a, $b, $c);
$_ = 0 for ($d, $e, $f);
($a,$b,$c) = ('') x 3; # ... = ('','','')
($d,$e,$f) = (0) x 3; # ... = (0,0,0)

Of course it would be easier if you wanted to set them to undef

($a,$b,$c) = (); # set them to undef

The only reason to loop over the variables is if you were doing it in a subroutine on behalf of some other scope.

sub fill{
  my $fill = shift;
  $_ = $fill for @_;
  return;
}

{
  fill( 0, my($d,$e,$f) ); # my($d,$e,$f) = (0) x 3;
}

Similarly, instead of going through a list of hash refs:

%$_ = () for \(%a, %b, %c);
# or
%$_ = () for (\%a, \%b, \%c);

Just set them to the empty list.

(%a,%b,%c) = ();

You should only rarely need to do this, if you set the scope of the variables correctly.

my(%a,%b,%c); # <== wrong

sub exmpl{
  (%a,%b,%c) = (); # <==

  # do something with them
  ...
}
sub exmpl{
  my (%a,%b,%c); # <== correct

  # do something with them
  ...
}
  • Thanks for your input. Did you test the (%a,%b,%c) = (); suggestion? How come it is not evaluated in list context, as mentioned in Patrick B.'s answer? Just curious. – W3Coder Apr 17 '13 at 12:38
  • @W3Coder I didn't need to test (%a,%b,%c) = ();. It is evaluated in list context, I just made it a list of references. – Brad Gilbert Apr 17 '13 at 19:07
  • I just thought of a way to do fill without looping. sub fill{ @_[0..$#_] = (shift) x @_ } – Brad Gilbert Apr 18 '13 at 3:42

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