83

In my Angular.js application, I'm running some asynchronous operation. Before it starts I cover the application with a modal div, then once the operation is complete, I need to remove the div, whether the operation was successful or not.

Currently I have this:

LoadingOverlay.start(); 
Auth.initialize().then(function() {
    LoadingOverlay.stop();
}, function() {
    LoadingOverlay.stop(); // Code needs to be duplicated here
})

It works well, however I would prefer to have something cleaner like this pseudo-code:

LoadingOverlay.start(); 
Auth.initialize().finally(function() { // *pseudo-code* - some function that is always executed on both failure and success.
    LoadingOverlay.stop();
})

I assume it's quite a common problem, so I was thinking it could be done but cannot find anything in the doc. Any idea if it can be done?

  • If you can chain one then(), then you can surely chain another ... .initialize().then(...).then(...). There's no "finally" as such; the final handler is the last one specified. – Beetroot-Beetroot Apr 16 '13 at 20:05
  • 2
    @Beetroot-Beetroot, that won't work because if initialize() fails, you still need to declare both a "success" function and a "fail" function and duplicate code in there. – laurent Apr 17 '13 at 2:46
  • Won't work, or just inelegant? – Beetroot-Beetroot Apr 17 '13 at 4:03
  • 1
    Laurent, what you want isn't currently available in Angular's lightweight $q service, which provides promises with just one method, .then() - see "The Promise API" here. The only freedom is to have one .then() or to chain multiple .then()s. You are not the first to wish for a more extensive promise API - the feature you want is formally requested here. – Beetroot-Beetroot Apr 17 '13 at 8:01
  • 1
    Apparently always(callback) is not implemented or rolled back in angular 1.2.6. We have to use finally now. I wonder why the reserved word finally is better than always. – Aleyna Dec 24 '13 at 17:22
161

The feature has been implemented in this pull request and is now part of AngularJS. It was initially called "always" and then later renamed to finally, so the code should be as follow:

LoadingOverlay.start(); 
Auth.initialize().then(function() {
    // Success handler
}, function() {
    // Error handler
}).finally(function() {
    // Always execute this on both error and success
});

Note that since finally is a reserved keyword, it might be necessary to make it a string so that it doesn't break on certain browsers (such as IE and Android Browser):

$http.get('/foo')['finally'](doSomething);
  • 10
    For anyone finding this from a web search, the link in the answer referred to the function always but it was changed to finally as you can see in this commit (or in the source): github.com/angular/angular.js/commit/… – Austin Thompson Jul 10 '14 at 16:16
  • @AustinThompson, thanks for the information, I have updated the post. – laurent Jul 10 '14 at 16:25
  • @this.lau_ does the finally() have to be the last call in the chain, or can I chain more then()s off of it? – Brian Sep 11 '14 at 14:17
  • 2
    You sir, made my day! – jvannistelrooy Nov 20 '14 at 16:39
  • 4
    @Brian finally returns a promise just like the rest, so you can chain it. However (at least on some versions of Angular) the convenience overloads success and error are only added to the immediate return of $http, so if you start with finally you'll lose those methods. – drzaus Nov 30 '15 at 19:25
7

I'm using Umbraco version 7.3.5 back end with AngularJS version 1.1.5 and found this thread. When I implemented the approved answer I got the error:

xxx(...).then(...).finally is not a function

What did work however was always. If anyone else using an old version of AngularJS finds this thread and can't use finally use this code instead

LoadingOverlay.start(); 
Auth.initialize().then(function() {
    // Success handler
}, function() {
    // Error handler
}).always(function() {
    // Always execute this on both error and success
});
2

For those not using angularJS, and if you're ok with catching the error (not sure if .finally() would do that), you could use .catch().then() to avoid the duplicated code.

Promise.resolve()
  .catch(() => {})
  .then(() => console.log('finally'));

The catch() might end up being useful anyway for logging or other cleanup. https://jsfiddle.net/pointzerotwo/k4rb41a7/

1

I would use ngView to render the content of the page and trigger the removal of you modal on the event $viewContentLoaded. See http://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng.directive:ngView for that event and http://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng.$rootScope.Scope for the $on event listener.

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