9

I'm playing around with a very simple program to take an array of doubles and return the standard deviation. This part worked but I wanted to make the code more reusable. I would like to make it so the method can accept a parameter of any type that could be considered numeric and return the standard deviation instead of hardcoding a double type (like I initially did in this program). How does one go about this and what is the proper term for it?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;


    namespace ConsoleApplication5
    {
        class Program
        {
            static void Main(string[] args)
            {
                double[] avg = { 3.4, 55.6, 10.0, 4.5, 2, 2 };
                double x = avg.Average();
                //first round of testing
                Console.WriteLine("The average of the first array is below ");
                Console.WriteLine(x);
                Console.WriteLine("below should be the standard deviation!");
                Console.WriteLine(CalculateStandardDeviation(avg));
                Console.ReadLine();
                int[] intAvg = { 4, 3, 5, 6, 2 };
                double secondAvg = intAvg.Average();
                Console.WriteLine("The average of the second array is below ");
                Console.WriteLine(secondAvg);
                //this is where the error is happening
                //CalculateStandardDeviation(secondAvg);

            }
            //this is where I tried to make the query more reusable
            public static double CalculateStandardDeviation(IEnumerable<double> values)
            {

                double avg = values.Average();
                double sum = 0;
                foreach (double d in values)
                {
                    sum += Math.Pow((d - avg), 2);

                }

                return Math.Pow(sum / (values.Count() - 1),.5);

            }
        }
    }
  • 2
    You could create a method for each type you would consider a valid "input" and let overloading handle it - all the other types then might just cast to double and call the version that takes IEnumerable<double>. You might be able to do it with generics (see this for example), but there's really no good way to generically constrain to only numeric types. – mellamokb Apr 16 '13 at 19:23
  • 2
    @wootscootinboogie You don't have that kind of constraint in C#, there's no base Numeric type. That's why e.g. Sum or Average have all these overloads... – Patryk Ćwiek Apr 16 '13 at 19:24
  • 1
    @mellamokb So I just need to overload the method with all possible numeric types that I want to include? – wootscootinboogie Apr 16 '13 at 19:26
  • 1
    @wootscootinboogie: That would be one simple way to handle it, yes. However, they can all share a common implementation. You don't need to (and shouldn't) copy/paste and duplicate the code into every method. – mellamokb Apr 16 '13 at 19:26
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    @wootscootinboogie Just be careful of the int overload version; you may not want to use integer division/averages (e.g., 5 / 2 = 2) – Chris Sinclair Apr 16 '13 at 19:27
6

You could use something like this:

public static decimal CalculateStandardDeviation<T>(IEnumerable<T> values)
{
    IEnumerable<decimal> decimalValues = values.Select(v => Convert.ToDecimal(v));

    decimal result = 0;

    // calculate standard deviation on decimalValues

    return result;
}

It will throw an exception if values contains values that can't be converted to a decimal, but will work if the values are of an appropriate type, and I think that makes perfect sense.

  • I'm unfamiliar with some of this syntax (noob). Could you explain the => operator? – wootscootinboogie Apr 16 '13 at 19:40
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    It's a lambda expression. When used in IEnumerable<T>.Select(), it essentially means "take (what's on the left of =>) and give me (what's on the right of =>)". – JLRishe Apr 16 '13 at 19:43
  • gracias, senor. – wootscootinboogie Apr 16 '13 at 19:44
  • @JLRishe: I think you could replace Select(v => Convert.ToDecimal(v)) with Select(Convert.ToDecimal). Now Wootscootinboogie doesn't need to think about lambda expressions :P – Brian Apr 16 '13 at 20:13
  • @Brian That's a great suggestion and that idea hadn't crossed my mind, but unfortunately it doesn't work. It produces a compile error: "No overload for 'System.Convert.ToDecimal(object)' matches delegate 'System.Func<T, decimal>'". You could do values.Cast<object>().Select(Convert.ToDecimal), but I think that's more convoluted than it's worth. – JLRishe Apr 16 '13 at 20:26
5

Unfortunately, there is no base class for all numbers. You can do this with a generic run-time checking method, or a compile-time safe set of overloads.

Generic Method:

public static T CalculateStandardDeviation(IEnumerable<T> values)
{
    var valueArray = values.Select(Convert.ToDecimal).ToArray();

    //...

    return (T)standardDeviation;
}

The problem with using a single generic method is that you can't put a type constraint on the type parameter that would restrict it to only numeric types. You would have to resort to failing at run-time. There would be nothing to stop you from calling the method with an array of strings, or objects, or Colors, or HttpWebRequests, etc. and unless you do in fact know how to calculate the standard deviation of a color, you should probably stick to individual overrides for a particular numeric type:

I would recommend using the decimal type as your main implementation, and then casting everything to it.

Type-Specific Overloads:

public static decimal CalculateStandardDeviation(IEnumerable<decimal> values)
{
    //...
}

public static double CalculateStandardDeviation(IEnumerable<double> values)
{
    return (double)CalculateStandardDeviation(values.Select(Convert.ToDecimal));
}

public static int CalculateStandardDeviation(IEnumerable<int> values)
{
    return (int)CalculateStandardDeviation(values.Select(Convert.ToDecimal));
}

// etc...
  • 1
    +1 for the standard deviation of a color. I smiled. – Bobson Apr 16 '13 at 19:31
  • 1
    @Chris In .Net 4.5 it works. I don't know if that's always been the case. I just tried it now. – Dan Apr 16 '13 at 19:36
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    Standard deviation of colors: Color.FromArgb(255 - CalculateStandardDeviation(colors.Select(c=>c.A)), CalculateStandardDeviation(colors.Select(c=>c.R)), CalculateStandardDeviation(colors.Select(c=>c.G)), CalculateStandardDeviation(colors.Select(c=>c.B))). Similar colors will be close to black and opaque. – Tim S. Apr 16 '13 at 19:43
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    @Tim Nice! Now we can add an overload for Colors! That's going to be super useful to many, I'm sure! :) – Dan Apr 16 '13 at 19:44
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    @Brian agreed, but there are very few numeric types, so I don't believe that to be a huge issue. – Dan Apr 16 '13 at 20:17
2

Use C# Generics.

Your function signature will be:

public static T CalculateStandardDeviation(IEnumerable<T> values)

And you can use it like:

int stdDev = CalculateStandardDeviation([int-array]);
double stdDev = CalculateStandardDeviation([double-array]);

Please follow this link:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms379564%28VS.80%29.aspx

Edit:

To resolve the Average issue on the generic types, please take a look in this library:

How to Implement Generic Method to do Math calculations on different value types

Obs: Suggestion from Brian.

  • 1
    Not sure on the generic usage; how would it handle averages, addition, division, etc? – Chris Sinclair Apr 16 '13 at 19:24
  • 1
    How do you do subtraction and Average on type T? – mellamokb Apr 16 '13 at 19:24
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    @NickFreeman: I downvoted the answer because it is incorrect. There is no way to implement the method with the given signature, and will not as it stands help the OP solve their question. I always remove a downvote if it is no longer warranted. – mellamokb Apr 16 '13 at 19:39
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    My point was to introduce the Generics concept and rise the user criativity forward a well designed solution. Thank you @NickFreeman, I agree with you. – gustavodidomenico Apr 16 '13 at 19:40
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    @gustavodidomenico: I honestly think due diligence would be an example, working implementation since it is a little unclear how this would actually work. But I have removed my downvote. – mellamokb Apr 16 '13 at 19:48
0

EDIT You should use JLRishe's answer, it's much more elegant than this.

You should probably start by adding generics to your method and use the type converter to transform your unknown input into doubles like so :

public static double CalculateStandardDeviation<TSource>(IEnumerable<TSource> inputs)
{
    var converter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof (double));
    if (!converter.CanConvertFrom(typeof(TSource)))
        return 0;

    var values = new List<double>();
    foreach (var value in inputs)
    {
        values.Add((double) converter.ConvertFrom(value));
    }

    // Your logic here ...
    return ...;
}

I did not tested this snippet but you get the idea.

0

Foreword: this answer builds on How to verify whether a type overloads/supports a certain operator? and http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/87438/TinyLisp-A-Language-and-Parser-to-See-LINQ-Express The second link shows how to compile and evaluate linq expressions.

In short you could forego static type safety and check for the ability of a type to support specific operations at runtime (first link), in case it does not you could throw an exception as the following sample demonstrates:

void Main()
{
    DoAdd<float>(5,6);
    DoAdd<int>(5,6);
    DoAdd<bool>(true,false);
}


// Define other methods and classes here
static void DoAdd<T>(T in1, T in2){
if(!HasAdd<T>()){throw new Exception("Unsupported Type!");}
 var c1 = Expression.Constant(in1, typeof(T));
 var c2 = Expression.Constant(in2, typeof(T));
 var expression=Expression.Add(c1, c2);
 Expression<Func<T>> lExpression = Expression.Lambda<Func<T>>(expression);
 Func<T> fExpression = lExpression.Compile();
 Console.WriteLine(fExpression());

}


static bool HasAdd<T>() {
    var c = Expression.Constant(default(T), typeof(T));
    try {
        Expression.Add(c, c); // Throws an exception if + is not defined
        return true;
    } catch {
        return false;
    }
}
  • Reasons why I don't like this answer: 1) It has to throw an exception for you to know whether or not you can add, which comes with a performance overhead. 2) If there is no add you throw a general Exception, which forces the caller to catch a general exception. Meaning they have no knowledge of why it was thrown and can do nothing to correct it. 3) It does not fix the problem of having to wait until runtime to know whether or not you can call the method with a specific type. Compile time error would be preferred. – Nick Freeman Apr 16 '13 at 20:20
  • Thank you for your feedback, it is appreciated. – Andrea Scarcella Apr 16 '13 at 21:58
0

Passing an IEnumerable of Numeric Values as a parameter to method will be supported in C# 6.0

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