3

I am writing a program that, when given a date, folder path, and file extension, will look into the folder and will go find all files that had a last access time from the beginning of the month to the current date, and only files with the file extension that was passed.

The files that I am looking for are always in the same level in the folder tree so I can code into the program how far to dig to find the files.

Currently my program takes about a minute for a day so today (The 16th) takes about sixteen and a half minutes.

I want to make a program that fill find all files for a date range in a folder path and will extract information from the file. I just don't want to code how deep the program has to look in case my business changes how they store their files.

I managed to make code that, if given a folder, the program will display the names of all the files for the date range but that took 25 minutes. Here is the code

TimeSpan BeginningTime = DateTime.Now.TimeOfDay;
DateTime BeginningDate = new DateTime(DateTime.Now.Year, DateTime.Now.Month, 1);
DateTime EndingDate = DateTime.Now;
string[] FoldersToLookAt = { @"e:\", @"e:\Kodak Images\", @"e:\images\", @"e:\AFSImageMerge\" };
foreach (string FolderPath in FoldersToLookAt)
{
    for (DateTime Date = BeginningDate; Date <= EndingDate; Date = Date.AddDays(1))
    {
        string DateString = Date.ToString("yyMMdd");
        string FilePath = (FolderPath + DateString);
        DirectoryInfo FilesToLookThrough = new DirectoryInfo(FilePath);
        if (FilesToLookThrough.Exists)
        {
            foreach (var MyFile in FilesToLookThrough.EnumerateFiles("*.dat", SearchOption.AllDirectories))
            {
                if (MyFile.LastAccessTime >= BeginningDate)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(MyFile.FullName);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

From what I see this first obtains all the files, then goes through all files and prints out all files that have a last access time greater than the beginning date.

Is their a way in C# that will extract information from a file and NOT store it in a list? Or am I going to have to build the program from scratch?

5
  • 1
    I'd assume EnumerateFiles uses yield return instead of building a full list, but I may be wrong... How many files are you looking through? Apr 16, 2013 at 21:06
  • Why does the code take so long? How many files are there is each directory?
    – svick
    Apr 16, 2013 at 22:23
  • @RobertRouhani I am going through about 6000 files. Apr 16, 2013 at 22:33
  • @svick My only guess on why the code takes so long is that EnumerateFiles stores all the files regardless of the date, than my foreach loop goes through the files and prints out the files that meet the date criteria. Apr 16, 2013 at 22:34
  • @DarrenHoehna Yeah, EnumerateFiles() goes through all files regardless of the date, since that's what you're telling it. (Though I don't think you can tell it to enumerate them based on the date. Also, it does not “store” them, it lazily streams them.)
    – svick
    Apr 16, 2013 at 22:48

3 Answers 3

2

Your question is not very clear, but looking at your code, and what you state you want to achieve, I would recommend that you get rid of the loop that takes you through the date folders. Just use the "AllDirectories" option, under each of the top-level folders. It is recursive, so it will go down through as many levels as there are.

TimeSpan BeginningTime = DateTime.Now.TimeOfDay;
DateTime BeginningDate = new DateTime(DateTime.Now.Year, DateTime.Now.Month, 1);
DateTime EndingDate = DateTime.Now;
string[] FoldersToLookAt = { @"e:\", @"e:\Kodak Images\", @"e:\images\", @"e:\AFSImageMerge\" };
foreach (string FolderPath in FoldersToLookAt)
{
    FilesToLookThrough = new DirectoryInfo(FolderPath);
    if (FilesToLookThrough.Exists)
    {
        foreach (var MyFile in FilesToLookThrough.EnumerateFiles("*.dat", SearchOption.AllDirectories))
        {
            if (MyFile.LastAccessTime >= BeginningDate)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(MyFile.FullName);
            }
        }
    }
}

EDIT: The other answer makes a good point, since you're going through "e:\", you probably don't need to go through the other "FoldersToLookAt", since they will all be searched anyway. What you might end up with here is multiple listings of the same file. If you take those out, it will run quite a bit faster.

You see, your code was pretty close in the first place. Using this approach you cut out a whole loop, and the "AllDirectories" search option will make sure that you look through all the sub-folders recursively. You are also protected against your organisation deciding not to store stuff in folders named by date etc, and now the runtime of your program is proportional only to the number of files.

Now, for extra credit, another big performance improvement can be made by not using Console.WriteLine for each item. A faster way would be to use a StringBuilder, and then spit the results out at the end.

// At the top of your program
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
// BeginningTime, BeginningDate, etc...

// Before the first loop
Console.WriteLine("Working...");

// Inside the very inner if, where your Console.WriteLine was
sb.AppendLine(MyFile.FullName);


// After the end of the outer loop
Console.WriteLine(sb.ToString());

Why does this make it better? Writing to the console is notoriously slow, it actually involves sending Windows into kernel mode and back, it's really, really slow. Doing it once, event with a much larger chunk of text, is much, much quicker, than doing it lots. Now, why use a StringBuilder instead of just doing a good old:

string output;

for(...)
{
     output += filename + Environment.NewLine;
}

In C# adding two strings to eachother creates a new string. Doing this over and over again is also slow, especially as the new string gets larger. StringBuilder just maintains a list of all the strings, and creates a new buffer and copies them all in, once, when you call ToString().

6
  • Your comment about String Builders caught me. I have heard a lot of people talking about using String Builders over the Console.WriteLine(). But would you run into issues if the String Builder got really big? For example the program that you saw above is outputting more than 10,000 lines. Would that take up a lot of memory? Apr 16, 2013 at 22:32
  • It would take up more memory, but it would be faster. There is often a trade-off between the two in this sort of scenario. Worst-case scenario, it's a few MB.
    – guysherman
    Apr 16, 2013 at 22:42
  • Alright. Thanks for that. I will try using String Builder from now on. First I got to go through these answers. And thank you for answering. Apr 16, 2013 at 22:48
  • if you don't mind me asking. What did you find unclear? I would like to know so next time I pose a question I can be more direct and cause less confusion. Apr 16, 2013 at 23:22
  • No problems. As I read it, the only question in your post was "Is their a way in C# that will extract information from a file and NOT store it in a list? Or am I going to have to build the program from scratch?". That question didn't seem to relate to the rest of your post, and I couldn't easily tell whether you wanted help making it go faster, or whether you wanted help making it cope with a different folder structure. It's ok though, we got there in the end. Good luck with your project.
    – guysherman
    Apr 16, 2013 at 23:53
0

Your program looks far more complex than what it has to, considering your requirements.

string[] FoldersToLookAt = { @"e:\",
                             @"e:\Kodak Images\",    // do you really need these,
                             @"e:\images\",          // since you're already
                             @"e:\AFSImageMerge\" }; // going through e:\ ?
DateTime BeginningDate = new DateTime(DateTime.Now.Year, DateTime.Now.Month, 1);

foreach (string FolderPath in FoldersToLookAt)
{
    DirectoryInfo FilesToLookThrough = new DirectoryInfo(FolderPath);
    foreach (FileInfo MyFile in FilesToLookThrough.EnumerateFiles("*.dat",
                                                    SearchOption.AllDirectories))
    {
        if (MyFile.LastAccessTime >= BeginningDate)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(MyFile.FullName);
        }
    }
}

This code does not loop through days, so it should have a constant runtime in regards to BeginningDate, meaning regardless of what date you choose, it will always take the same amount of time.

0

It sounds like, given a list of directories to search, find all files in certain subdirectories of the directories to be searched that match a particular pattern and have have been touched within the current month. Given that problem statement, something like this should do you:

static IEnumerable<FileInfo> FindFiles( IEnumerable<string> directories , string searchPattern )
{
  DateTime     dtNow       = DateTime.Now.Date                ; // current date
  DateTime     dtFrom      = dtNow.AddDays( dtNow.Day - 1 )   ; // compute the first of the month @ start-of-day
  DateTime     dtThru      = dtFrom.AddMonths(1).AddTicks(-1) ; // compute the last of the month @ end-of-day
  string       childPattern = dtFrom.ToString( "yyMM*") ;

  return directories.Select( x => new DirectoryInfo( x ) )
                    .Where( x => x.Exists )
                    .SelectMany( x => x.EnumerateDirectories( childPattern , SearchOption.TopDirectoryOnly )
                                       .Where( subDir => {
                                           int dd ;
                                           int.TryParse( subDir.Name.Substring(4,2) , out dd ) ;
                                           return dd >= dtFrom.Day && dd <= dtThru.Day ;
                                         })
                    )
                    .SelectMany( subDir => subDir.EnumerateFiles( searchPattern , SearchOption.TopDirectoryOnly )
                                                 .Where( file => file.LastAccessTime >= dtFrom && file.LastAccessTime <= dtThru )
                    )
                    ;

}

An explanation of what this code does:

directories.Select( x => new DirectoryInfo( x ) )

Takes the supplied enumerable list of string directory paths and converts it into an enumerable list of DirectoryInfo objects representing the specified directories

.Where( x => x.Exists )

Excludes any non-existent directories

This gives use the set of root directories to be searched.

The next clause is a little more complicated. SelectMany() takes an enumerable list of things. Each item in the list is converted into an enumerable list of things (which might or might not be the same type of object as the original. However, each such sublist must be of the same type.)

The resulting "list of lists" is then flattened to produce a single enumerable list.

With that in mind,

.SelectMany( x => x.EnumerateDirectories( childPattern , SearchOption.TopDirectoryOnly )
                   .Where( subDir => {
                     int dd ;
                     int.TryParse( subDir.Name.Substring(4,2) , out dd ) ;
                     return dd >= dtFrom.Day && dd <= dtThru.Day ;
                   })
                )

Converts each root directory into a list of subdirectories, whose name starts with the year and month specified (yyMM*) and whose 4th & 5th characters are the day of the month. That list of lists of subdirectories is then flattened into a single list of subdirectories.

The last SelectMany()

.SelectMany( subDir => subDir.EnumerateFiles( searchPattern , SearchOption.TopDirectoryOnly )
                             .Where( file => file.LastAccessTime >= dtFrom
                                          && file.LastAccessTime <= dtThru
                                   )
 )

goes over the list of subdirectories resulting from the first SelectMany(), searching each for files whose names match the specified name pattern (*.dat in your example) and whose last access time is within the specified time frame.

The resulting list of lists of FileInfo objects is then flattened into a single list of FileInfo objects representing the files in which you're interested.

You can then access them directorly, something like

string[] searchDirs =
{ @"e:\"              ,
  @"e:\Kodak Images\" ,
  @"e:\images\"       ,
  @"e:\AFSImageMerge\"
} ;

foreach ( FileInfo fi in FindFiles( searchDirs , "*.dat" )
{
  do_something_with_interesting_file( fi ) ;
}
2
  • With this I would first use EnumerateFiles to get the Ienumerable<string> that I would pass to this method. Then I would use your method to get all files that are within the date range. Correct? Apr 16, 2013 at 23:44
  • @DarrenHoehna - See my amended answer for explanatory text. Apr 17, 2013 at 17:26

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