20

This question already has an answer here:

Corner Border Effect
Corner Border Effect
Can't seem to find any help on how to achieve this effect using CSS.

marked as duplicate by web-tiki css Feb 23 '17 at 8:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Can you change your HTML or are you willing to do so? beacuse I don't think you can do wat you want with just CSS – Matías Cánepa Apr 17 '13 at 1:50
  • Willing to change anything at this moment, but I think I am going to go with a background image. It seems the easiest method to pull off right now. – VersionONE Apr 17 '13 at 1:54
  • 2
    I would recomend to go with this solution (stackoverflow.com/a/14388399/702353) because you can change dimensions in the future and not get stucked with an image – Matías Cánepa Apr 17 '13 at 2:00
  • That actually worked. I tried some of the other ones on that page before and they would blow up when I would add content. Must of skipped right over that answer... thank you very much. – VersionONE Apr 17 '13 at 2:11
5

i think that you can also achieve that by create a rounded rectangle shape with a transparent fill using any picture editor like photoshop then make this image as background for what you are trying to make border to then let this image be in a div that have position absolute and have z-index suitable that can be over the part you want to give this effect without affecting the display

Because simply border-radius is not compatible with all old browsers and in new browser this must be used in many forms so that can be compatible with safari , opera, ie,chrome ,mozilla so i think that using like this attribute in a website that may be access from old browsers is not very effictive ! This is just my point of view :)

  • You sir/ma'am are a genius. I never even considered a background image. That will make everything a lot easier. – VersionONE Apr 17 '13 at 1:51
20

Here's a CSS only option, in case anyone is curious, using generated content (though you could use extra elements, for better browser support - :before and :after are IE8+ – http://caniuse.com/#feat=css-gencontent).

HTML:

<div><span></span></div>

CSS:

div {
    position: relative;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    margin: 20px;
    border: 1px solid #000;
}
div:before {
    display: block;
    content: "";
    width: 20px;
    height: 20px;
    position: absolute;
    top: -10px;
    left: -10px;
    border-top: 1px solid #000;
    border-left: 1px solid #000;
}
div:after {
    display: block;
    content: "";
    width: 20px;
    height: 20px;
    position: absolute;
    top: -10px;
    right: -10px;
    border-top: 1px solid #000;
    border-right: 1px solid #000;
}
span:before {
    display: block;
    content: "";
    width: 20px;
    height: 20px;
    position: absolute;
    bottom: -10px;
    left: -10px;
    border-bottom: 1px solid #000;
    border-left: 1px solid #000;
}
span:after {
    display: block;
    content: "";
    width: 20px;
    height: 20px;
    position: absolute;
    bottom: -10px;
    right: -10px;
    border-bottom: 1px solid #000;
    border-right: 1px solid #000;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/ryanbrill/ARVvq/

  • 2
    Oh yeah! +1 for the use of selectors – Matías Cánepa Apr 17 '13 at 2:05
  • Nicely done, and flexible to apply to multiple elements on a page. – mikekidder Apr 17 '13 at 3:30
12

Here is a border-image solution I came up with that works with any size content.

Here is a Demo.

This is the image used for the code:

border: 15px solid #000000;
border-image: url('https://i.stack.imgur.com/1WlsT.png') 34% repeat;

css edge border image

If you want the element to be the size you explicitly set, add:

box-sizing: border-box;
  • always amazed what you can do with images. creative! – mikekidder Apr 17 '13 at 3:31
5

Here is a creative approach...Don't think there is any native support for this kind of feature.

http://jsfiddle.net/tlaverdure/NrU34/

.box1{
position:relative;
background:#FFF;
width:200px;
height:200px;
border:solid 2px #090;
-webkit-border-radius: 3px;
border-radius: 3px;
margin:0 auto;
}
.box2{
position:absolute;
width:210px;
height:180px;
background-color:#FFF;
top:10px;
left:-5px;
}
.box3{
position:absolute;
width:180px;
height:210px;
background-color:#FFF;
top:-5px;
left:10px;
}
.box4{
border:solid 1px #009;
width:175px;
height:175px;
margin: 10px auto;
position:relative;
}
3

A pure CSS way would be using pseudo elements like this : - The offset (top and left) is equal to the negative of the border-width

body {
 
}

ul {
  list-style: none;
  text-align: center;
}

li {
  position: relative;
  display: inline-block;
  padding: 10px 40px;
  background-color: yellow;
  border: 1px solid #000;
  z-index: 0;
}

li:before {
  position: absolute;
  content: '';
  top: -1px;
  left: calc(50%);
  transform: translate(-50%,0);
  height: calc(100% + 2px);
  width: calc(100% - 15px);
  background-color: yellow;
  z-index: -1;
}

li:after {
  position: absolute;
  content: '';
  top: 50%;
  left: -1px;
  transform: translate(0%,-50%);
  height: calc(100% - 15px);
  width: calc(100% + 2px);
  background-color: yellow;
  z-index: -1;
}

a {
  position: relative;
  z-index: 1;
}
<ul>
  <li><a href="#">Home</a></li>
  <li><a href="#">About</a></li>
  <li><a href="#">Contact</a></li>
  <li><a href="#">Blog</a></li>
</ul>

0

Here is a working example: http://jsfiddle.net/3jo5btxd/

CSS:

#div1 {
    position: relative;
    height: 100px;
    width: 100px;
    background-color: white;
    border: 1px solid transparent;
}

#div2 {
    position: absolute;
    top: -2px;
    left: -2px;
    height: 84px;
    width: 84px;
    background-color: #FFF;
    border-radius: 15px;
    padding: 10px;
}

#div1:hover {
    border: 1px solid red;
}

HTML:

<div id="div1"><div id="div2"><img src="http://placekitten.com/g/82/82"></div></div>

Modified to add the border on hover.

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