2

I am trying to parse some data which is formatted as follows.

data: [a b x b x x b a a x x b b x ]

What I need it to extract the a's and b's in order and perform a different action for each a and b.

The expected output would be:

a
b
b
b
a
a
b
b
== true

I have come up with this so far, but it fails for repeated a's.

parse data [
  some [
    thru 'a (print "a")
    some [
      any [
        to 'b (print "b")
      ]
      to 'a
    ]
  ]
  to end
]

Any pointers? Thanks

4
>> data: [a b x b x x b a a x x b b x ]
== [a b x b x x b a a x x b b x]

>> parse data [ some [ 'a (print "a") | 'b (print "b") | skip ] ]
a
b
b
b
a
a
b
b
== true
4

I may be missing something...but isn't what you want simply:

 parse data [
     any [
         thru ['a (print "a") | 'b (print "b")]
     ]
     to end
 ]

That generates the output you request.

  • Thank you, you are correct. I was stuck thinking how the data was structured as an a followed by 0 or more b's. Your solution is neater as it is really just saying if I get an a do this or if I get a b do this and the order is implicit as parse moves forward through the series. – johnk Apr 17 '13 at 5:31
  • Sure. @GrahamChiu's is a bit better, though! – HostileFork Apr 17 '13 at 5:45
  • 1
    Actually, this one is much better in Rebol 3. Graham's will work in Rebol 2 though. – BrianH Apr 17 '13 at 15:38
  • 1
    I must add that using 'TO and 'THRU in parse isn't always recommended for complex rules, since they they aren't pattern matching but searches (exactly like a find on a normal series). when mingling normal parse pattern matching and searching together, very complex bugs may appear in real life. For simpler rules, (under 10 lines) 'TO and 'THRU often create more obvious rules though (when reading them)... like can be seen above. – moliad May 1 '13 at 21:56
3

It's the to and thru, you don't really need them. Let's take advantage of R3 here and do without.

parse data [
    some [
        'a (print "a")
        any [
            'b (print "b") |
            and 'a break |
            skip
        ]
    ]
    to end
]

The and does a lookahead, and the break breaks out of the any rule. That lets you stop the inner loop when you reach the beginning of the next one.

The to and thru will skip past stuff that you don't want to skip past, and in the case of the to 'b in your code it didn't actually do anything most of the time. You were lucky that the any loop that you wrapped the to 'b in was changed in R3 to not continue if it doesn't advance, because it was not advancing.

As for your first problem, the inner some after the (print "a") should have been an any, to make it optional. The some wasn't optional so it didn't work for runs of a with no intervening data.

PARSE can be tricky, but you get the hang of it.

  • Thanks Brian, very clear explanation. I had not seen and before. Are the docs here the most up to date source for info on parse?rebol.com/r3/docs/functions/parse.html – johnk Apr 17 '13 at 5:41
  • The other answers will work, but don't do the nested loop thing so they don't really answer your question. Still, if you don't really need to know how to do the nested loops then they will work! – BrianH Apr 17 '13 at 15:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.