12

I just can't for the life of me figure out why I'm getting an out of memory exception here, even after much research on various websites and forums. Is anyone able to shed some light on the root of all evil in this code? The exception is thrown by the call to the Graphics.DrawImage() method, line 79.

[HttpPost]
    [ValidateAntiForgeryToken]
    public ActionResult EditImage(FileModel model)
    {
        var fileData = new MySite.Models.File(model.FileID, model.ClientID, ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["MySite"].ConnectionString).Data;
        Image image = null;

        using (var memStream = new MemoryStream())
        {
            memStream.Write(fileData, 0, fileData.Length);
            image = Image.FromStream(memStream);
        }

        using (var graphics = Graphics.FromImage(image))
        {
            graphics.DrawImage(image, model.x1, model.y1, (model.x2 - model.x1), (model.y2 - model.y1));
            graphics.Save();
        }

        using (var memStream = new MemoryStream())
        {
            image.Save(memStream, System.Drawing.Imaging.ImageFormat.Jpeg);
            return File(memStream.ToArray(), "image/jpeg");
        }
    }

Stack trace:

[OutOfMemoryException: Out of memory.]
System.Drawing.Graphics.CheckErrorStatus(Int32 status) +1143476
System.Drawing.Graphics.DrawImage(Image image, Int32 x, Int32 y, Int32 width, Int32 height) +141
ProPilot.Controllers.DocumentsController.EditImage(FileModel model) in C:\DEV\Web\Controllers\DocumentsController.cs:79
lambda_method(Closure , ControllerBase , Object[] ) +104
System.Web.Mvc.ActionMethodDispatcher.Execute(ControllerBase controller, Object[] parameters) +14
System.Web.Mvc.ReflectedActionDescriptor.Execute(ControllerContext controllerContext, IDictionary`2 parameters) +211
System.Web.Mvc.ControllerActionInvoker.InvokeActionMethod(ControllerContext controllerContext, ActionDescriptor actionDescriptor, IDictionary`2 parameters) +27
System.Web.Mvc.Async.<>c__DisplayClass42.<BeginInvokeSynchronousActionMethod>b__41() +28
System.Web.Mvc.Async.<>c__DisplayClass8`1.<BeginSynchronous>b__7(IAsyncResult _) +10
System.Web.Mvc.Async.WrappedAsyncResult`1.End() +57
System.Web.Mvc.Async.AsyncControllerActionInvoker.EndInvokeActionMethod(IAsyncResult asyncResult) +48
System.Web.Mvc.Async.<>c__DisplayClass39.<BeginInvokeActionMethodWithFilters>b__33() +57
System.Web.Mvc.Async.<>c__DisplayClass4f.<InvokeActionMethodFilterAsynchronously>b__49() +223
System.Web.Mvc.Async.<>c__DisplayClass37.<BeginInvokeActionMethodWithFilters>b__36(IAsyncResult asyncResult) +10
System.Web.Mvc.Async.WrappedAsyncResult`1.End() +57
System.Web.Mvc.Async.AsyncControllerActionInvoker.EndInvokeActionMethodWithFilters(IAsyncResult asyncResult) +48
System.Web.Mvc.Async.<>c__DisplayClass2a.<BeginInvokeAction>b__20() +24
System.Web.Mvc.Async.<>c__DisplayClass25.<BeginInvokeAction>b__22(IAsyncResult asyncResult) +102
System.Web.Mvc.Async.WrappedAsyncResult`1.End() +57
System.Web.Mvc.Async.AsyncControllerActionInvoker.EndInvokeAction(IAsyncResult asyncResult) +43
System.Web.Mvc.<>c__DisplayClass1d.<BeginExecuteCore>b__18(IAsyncResult asyncResult) +14
System.Web.Mvc.Async.<>c__DisplayClass4.<MakeVoidDelegate>b__3(IAsyncResult ar) +23
System.Web.Mvc.Async.WrappedAsyncResult`1.End() +62
System.Web.Mvc.Controller.EndExecuteCore(IAsyncResult asyncResult) +57
System.Web.Mvc.Async.<>c__DisplayClass4.<MakeVoidDelegate>b__3(IAsyncResult ar) +23
System.Web.Mvc.Async.WrappedAsyncResult`1.End() +62
System.Web.Mvc.Controller.EndExecute(IAsyncResult asyncResult) +47
System.Web.Mvc.Controller.System.Web.Mvc.Async.IAsyncController.EndExecute(IAsyncResult asyncResult) +10
System.Web.Mvc.<>c__DisplayClass8.<BeginProcessRequest>b__3(IAsyncResult asyncResult) +25
System.Web.Mvc.Async.<>c__DisplayClass4.<MakeVoidDelegate>b__3(IAsyncResult ar) +23
System.Web.Mvc.Async.WrappedAsyncResult`1.End() +62
System.Web.Mvc.MvcHandler.EndProcessRequest(IAsyncResult asyncResult) +47
System.Web.Mvc.MvcHandler.System.Web.IHttpAsyncHandler.EndProcessRequest(IAsyncResult result) +9
System.Web.CallHandlerExecutionStep.System.Web.HttpApplication.IExecutionStep.Execute() +9629296
System.Web.HttpApplication.ExecuteStep(IExecutionStep step, Boolean& completedSynchronously) +155 
10
  • 2
    Can we maybe get the stacktrace?
    – uriDium
    Apr 17 '13 at 8:55
  • @uriDium Ah, yes of course. Sorry for not including it immediately!
    – Maritim
    Apr 17 '13 at 8:58
  • 1
    I think its possible the image is screwed when you close the memstream.. that was the problem for this - stackoverflow.com/questions/16030269/…
    – Sayse
    Apr 17 '13 at 9:03
  • 1
    Maritim, just accept lummo's answer.. I'm being lazy :)
    – Sayse
    Apr 17 '13 at 9:06
  • 1
    @Maritim Fair enough just make sure you dispose of all your IDisposable objects (like Image) when you finish the code or you'll end up leaking memory and handles in the long term :)
    – Lummo
    Apr 17 '13 at 9:09
14

@Sayse hit the nail on the head with his comment above.

When using Image.FromStream:

You must keep the stream open for the lifetime of the Image.

Source: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-AU/library/93z9ee4x.aspx

using (var memStream = new MemoryStream())
{
    memStream.Write(fileData, 0, fileData.Length);
    using(Image image = Image.FromStream(memStream))
    {
        using (var graphics = Graphics.FromImage(image))
        {
            graphics.DrawImage(image, model.x1, model.y1, (model.x2 - model.x1), (model.y2 - model.y1));
            graphics.Save();
        }

        using (var outStream = new MemoryStream())
        {
            image.Save(outStream, System.Drawing.Imaging.ImageFormat.Jpeg);
            return File(outStream.ToArray(), "image/jpeg");
        }
    }
}
4
  • Would you please explain more ?
    – cat_minhv0
    Apr 17 '13 at 9:15
  • 2
    @minhcat_vo The image relies on the memory stream being available throughout its lifetime. If the memory stream is in a using and the image is used outside the scope of this using the memory stream will already be disposed. Therefore the image cannot access it and you get exceptions like above.
    – Lummo
    Apr 17 '13 at 9:18
  • What a STUPID design is this? If the image file has been read to memory and stored in an Image object what is the stream needed for until the end of the lifetime?
    – Elmue
    Sep 1 '14 at 17:51
  • @Elmue - I agree it seems stupid, but FWIW the requirement is stated in the docs. In the FromStream docs under Remarks: "You must keep the stream open for the lifetime of the Bitmap." I recall seeing some statement elsewhere that this is done because the object may need to be recreated from its source under certain circumstances - sorry I can't seem to find where that was discussed. Bottom line: the designers apparently did NOT wish to require the Image object to always hold on to its copy of the data. Oct 17 '16 at 16:42
1

If you work with the Bitmap or Image class you will find several problems.

If you load an image with Image.FromFile() the framework does not close the file handle after loading the image. The file stays open until the garbage collector recollects the image. This is a severe misdesign in GDI+. There is no need to keep a file open after the image has already been read into memory.

So I tried to work around this problem by using Image.FromStream() instead. But this is no solution because when the stream has been closed a DrawImage() operation on that image will fail with "Out of memory".

So if you want to read for example a Bitmap from a file and you want to assure that the file handle is closed you have to use an ugly workaround like this:

Bitmap ReadBitmapFromFile(String s_Path)
{
    using (FileStream i_Stream = new FileStream(s_Path, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.ReadWrite))
    {
        using (Bitmap i_Bmp = new Bitmap(i_Stream))
        {
            return new Bitmap(i_Bmp);
        }
    }
}

By the way: Image.Clone() produces a similar problem.

Instead of

Bitmap i_Clone = (Bitmap)i_Bmp.Clone() 

I had to use:

Bitmap i_Clone = new Bitmap(i_Bmp);
2
  • Re "There is no need to keep a file open after the image has already been read into memory." IMHO, That is speculation regarding the internal design of GDI+ - Clearly, there IS some (internal) need to keep the source available - Regrettably, the docs don't explain WHY that is - but then docs never do. Oct 17 '16 at 16:52
  • 1
    Well. I don't know why. You don't know either. But fact is that executing my above code you will have the image in memory and the file will be closed. Which confirms my sentence: There is no need to keep a file open after the image has already been read into memory.
    – Elmue
    Oct 18 '16 at 4:17

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.