4

I have searched for creating a Singleton object for a window in WPF.

public static Test DefInstance
{
    get
    {
        if (formDefInstance == null)  // formDefInstance.IsDisposed
        {
            initializingDefInstance = true;
            formDefInstance = new cas18();
            initializingDefInstance = false;
        }
        return formDefInstance;
    }
    set { formDefInstance = value; }
}

But the forDefInstance.IsDisposed is not working and throwing an error.

Any Idea regarding this?

9
  • 3
    There's no reason to downvote this question. From the code sample it is pretty clear what he wants to do: He wants the window to be opened only once, but also wants to detect if the window was closed. Then it should be possible to open it again, but never should there be two of these windows on screen at the same time. I actually think it's a pretty interesting question! Apr 17 '13 at 9:20
  • 3
    @ThorstenDittmar: I was not the one who downvoted, but writing "... is not working and throwing an error" without including the error message is like asking to be downvoted.
    – Heinzi
    Apr 17 '13 at 9:22
  • 1
    @Heinzi While this is true that the question is not complete, I don't think it deserves a downvote. @ OP please add the error message.
    – ken2k
    Apr 17 '13 at 9:27
  • There is no IsDisposed property in the Window class (WPF). Are you talking about winforms instead?
    – ken2k
    Apr 17 '13 at 9:30
  • 1
    @ThorstenDittmar/ken2k: I suspect that's correct - and I'd say that it's a reasonable reason to downvote the question, at least in the absence of an edit or clarification from the OP. (I've not downvoted myself, but I can see why people might.)
    – Dan Puzey
    Apr 18 '13 at 14:24
0

I think everyone should take a look at Jon Skeet's C# In Depth site. If only to read and permanently burn into their brains the singleton patter a-la C#.

http://csharpindepth.com/Articles/General/Singleton.aspx

In your scenario, try to implement this (thread safe, non-lazy):

public sealed class DefInstance
{
  private static readonly DefInstance instance = new DefInstance();
  static DefInstance()
  {
  }

  private DefInstance()
  {
  }

  public static DefInstance Instance
  {
    get
    {
      return instance;
    }
   }
} 

There are also Lazy<T> implementions and various other implementations of the pattern in that site.

0

I don't know if it's what you want to do but it works for me :

private static MyWindow _defInstance;
public static MyWindow DefInstance
{
    get
    {
        if (null == _defInstance)
        {
            _defInstance = new MyWindow();
        }
        return _defInstance;
    }
 }

In MyWindow code :

protected override void OnClosing(System.ComponentModel.CancelEventArgs e)
{
    this.Visibility = Visibility.Hidden;
    e.Cancel = true;
}

To use it :

DefInstance.Show();

Then, only one window is display and you use one instance of your window.

-2

you can achieve this by implementing following method

private static volatile DefInstance instance;
private static object syncRoot = new Object();

private DefInstance() {}

public static DefInstance Instance
{
   get 
   {
      if (instance == null) 
      {
         lock (syncRoot) 
         {
            if (instance == null) 
               instance = new DefInstance();
         }
      }

      return instance;
   }
}
6
  • Whoa! Why volatile? The objective of a singleton is to create once and prevent subsequent instance creation. The volatile keyword makes it possible to create one or more subsequent instance and assign it to the DefInstance. Use readonly instead.
    – code4life
    Apr 18 '13 at 14:30
  • the variable is declared to be volatile to ensure that assignment to the instance variable completes before the instance variable can be accessed Apr 18 '13 at 14:32
  • 1
    private static readonly DefInstance instance = new DefInstance() ensures thread safety and accessibility, and prevents subsequent writes. volatile does not.
    – code4life
    Apr 18 '13 at 14:37
  • please read this question answer then you will be able to know why i have mention to use volatile.. stackoverflow.com/questions/1964731/… Apr 18 '13 at 16:32
  • and i have mentioned double checked locking method in the example.. for more on to this concept you can refer to this document en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-checked_locking Apr 18 '13 at 16:36

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