11

I was surprised to find the following difference cost between running the MATLAB for loops:

ksize = 100;
klist = 1:ksize;

tic
for m = 1:100000        
    for k = 1:ksize

    end        
end
toc

tic
for m = 1:100000        
    for k = klist

    end        
end
toc

The only difference being the way the index list is created. I would have suspected the second version to be faster, but lo!

Elapsed time is 0.055400 seconds.
Elapsed time is 1.695904 seconds.

My question is twofold: what is responsible for the above result, and where else does this nuance (or similar ones) occur in MATLAB programming? I hope to be able to better spot these inefficiencies in the future. Thanks all.

  • 3
    This is probably due to JIT acceleration, because if you turn it off using feature accel off, you get similar results for both runs. – Eitan T Apr 17 '13 at 12:23
4

The documentation in for() states:

for index = values
   ...
end

where values has one of the following forms:

  • ...

  • valArray: creates a column vector index from subsequent columns of array valArray on each iteration. For example, on the first iteration, index = valArray(:,1). The loop executes for a maximum of n times, where n is the number of columns of valArray, given by numel(valArray, 1, :). The input valArray can be of any MATLAB data type, including a string, cell array, or struct.

Therefore, I assume there is a significant overhead and the compiler does not check whether 1:ksize == klist to exploit the faster implementation. In other words, per Eitan's comment, the JIT applies to the first two types of accepted values.

The whole problem is related to the following indexing task (column vs element):

tic
for m = 1:100000        
    for k = 1:ksize
        klist(:,k);
    end        
end
toc

tic
for m = 1:100000        
    for k = 1:ksize
        klist(k);
    end        
end
toc

Index column:  ~2.9 sec
Index element: ~0.28 sec

You can see how klist(:,k) effectively slows down the faster loop indicating that the issue in for k = klist is related to the column indexing used in this case.

For additional details see this lengthy discussion on (inefficient) indexing.

| improve this answer | |
2

My answer is speculation (because only Mathworks guys know the implementation of their product), but I think the first k loop is optimized to not create the actual array of indices, but to just scan them one by one, because it explicitely shows how the values are "built". The second k loop cannot be optimized, because the interpreter doesn't know beforehand if the content of the index array will grow uniformly. So, each time the loop starts, it will copy access the original klist and that's why you have the performance penalty.

Later edit: Another performance penalty might be from indexed access int the klist array, compared to creating the index values "on the fly."

| improve this answer | |
  • I wonder if you could test this by creating a class that derives from double and overrides copy... – wakjah Apr 17 '13 at 12:21
  • @wakjah Checked, and it's not about copying (there's no copying taking place actually -- I think copy-on-write still works). It's about subscripted reference in klist. I corrected mt post. Thanks for the idea. – user2271770 Apr 17 '13 at 12:31
  • @wakjah On another hand, copy works on handle subclasses, and one cannot inherit value and handle classes the same time (at lear not in R2010a that I have). I wonder if I actually overridden anything... :D – user2271770 Apr 17 '13 at 12:37
  • This is true... perhaps in the constructor/subsasgn of a value class then? – wakjah Apr 17 '13 at 12:40

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