30

How does one format a long assert statement that complies with PEP8? Please ignore the contrived nature of my example.

def afunc(some_param_name):
    assert isinstance(some_param_name, SomeClassName), 'some_param_name must be an instance of SomeClassName, silly goose!'

One cannot wrap it in parenthesis, because that changes the behavior of the assert statement since it is a keyword, not a builtin function.

  • assert should really only be used for debugging purpose, any other use is abuse of the assert functionality. All asserts are also removed when running python with the -O option. – Wessie Apr 17 '13 at 16:38
  • 5
    @Wessie I don't see how that is relevant. – Gareth Latty Apr 17 '13 at 16:40
46

It's important to remember that PEP8 is only a guideline and even states that there are times when the rules should be broken.

But most importantly: know when to be inconsistent -- sometimes the style guide just doesn't apply.

With that in mind, I would probably write this with old style line continuation:

def afunc(some_param_name):
    assert isinstance(some_param_name, SomeClassName), \ 
           'some_param_name must be an instance of SomeClassName, silly goose!'

If that doesn't sit well with you (or your linter), you can always do:

def afunc(some_param_name):
    assert isinstance(some_param_name, SomeClassName), ( 
           'some_param_name must be an instance of SomeClassName, silly goose!')

or even:

def afunc(some_param_name):
    assert isinstance(some_param_name, SomeClassName), ( 
           'some_param_name must be an instance of SomeClassName, '
           'silly goose!')
  • 1
    +1. I would argue this is the more readable solution here. Bracket continuations are preferred over backslash line continuations, but that's a general statement, and individual cases vary. – Gareth Latty Apr 17 '13 at 16:42
  • +1 for "rules should be broken". I tend to use the old style line continuation, if only because it's the solution which requires the fewest keystrokes to write. That's also one of the reasons I prefer Python to PHP: def is shorter than function. There are, of course, far more compelling reasons than that. ;-) – Aya Apr 17 '13 at 17:29
  • Awesome, thanks. Totally agree on PEP8 being a guideline. We use flake8 (which combines pyflakes and pep8.py), and I figured that there was something that would satisfy the spirit of PEP8 as well as the linters. – stantonk Apr 17 '13 at 21:04
5
ERR_MESSAGE_01 = '''
Some really long error message
'''

assert condition(a,b), ERR_MESSAGE_01

Is how I do it ...and I think that complies fine ..

  • 4
    When the post is talking about PEP-8 compliance, the CAPS_WITH_UNDERSCORES names are not helping. – Gareth Latty Apr 17 '13 at 16:39
  • yeah fair point ... carryover from c #defines and constants. dubious... but im sticking to it . besides i am thinking of it as a module level constant which pep8 tells us to name as such – Joran Beasley Apr 17 '13 at 16:42
  • 5
    Constants: Constants are usually defined on a module level and written in all capital letters with underscores separating words. Examples include MAX_OVERFLOW and TOTAL. – Joran Beasley Apr 17 '13 at 16:44
  • Yes, except in this case, extracting the error message to a module level constant would be awkward (meaning the user would have to jump around to see the value), and CONDITION() is a function, not a constant. – Gareth Latty Apr 17 '13 at 16:45
  • not really I usually create an errors.py module that contains all my error messages as (well named)constants ... obviously not naming them ERR_1 ... also I fixed the function name and the local a,b variable names as you are 100% correct on that front :) (this also lends itself well to localization) – Joran Beasley Apr 17 '13 at 16:48
3

It's worth noting that it is possible to wrap with parenthesis, just not in the way you are thinking.

assert isinstance(some_param_name, 
                  SomeClassName), ('some_param_name must be an instance of '
                                   'SomeClassName, silly goose!')

I wouldn't argue it's particularly readable, however. In some cases, it might be the right option.

1
def afunc(some_param_name):
    assert (isinstance(some_param_name, SomeClassName)
            ), 'some_param_name must be an instance of SomeClassName, silly goose!'

This gives you the implied line continuation from parentheses that is recommended by PEP 8 without breaking the assert behavior.

Alternatively:

def afunc(some_param_name):
    assert isinstance(some_param_name, SomeClassName), (
           'some_param_name must be an instance of SomeClassName, silly goose!')

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.