2

I'm using a method that has a return signatur of IEnumerable<dynamic>. At runtime for a particular call it is returning List<Dapper.SqlMapper.FastExpando>.

var x0 = repo.Find(proc, param); 
//x0 runtime type is {List<Dapper.SqlMapper.FastExpando>}

LINQPad.Extensions.Dump indicates the runtime type of x0 is: List<IDictionary<String, Object>> but I can't seem to cast/convert to List<IDictionary<String, Object>>. Here is a screenshot of the Linqpad Dump: enter image description here

Ultimately I need to join all the Values from each Dictionary to a single IEnumerable<DateTime>.

IEnumerable<DateTime> GetDates(int productId) 
{
    const string proc = "[dbo].[myproc]";
    dynamic param = new { Id = "asdf" };
    var x0 = repo.Find(proc, param); 
    //...
    //linq conversion from x0 to IEnumerable<DateTime> here.
}

Error I'm getting

List<IDictionary<String, Object>> x5 = repo.Find(proc, param);

results in:

RuntimeBinderException: Cannot implicitly convert type 'object' to
 'System.Collections.Generic
     .List<System.Collections.Generic.IDictionary<string,object>>'.
An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?)

BACKGROUND: I am using a Dapper wrapper and can't change the database table/stored procedure which returns denormalized results. Instead of 100 rows of 1 data element, the sproc returns 1 row of 100 columns. I wanted to avoid creating a class to represent the 100 columns and want to take advantage of Dapper's automagical ability to transpose the column data to rows via an IDictionary of columnName, columnValue.

UPDATE This appears to be an issue with the dynamic param. When specified inline, it works. If specified locally and then passes as a parameter, it fails.

IEnumerable<DateTime> GetDates(int productId) 
{
    const string proc = "[dbo].[myproc]";
    dynamic param = new { Id = "asdf" };

    //next line throws RuntimeBinderException: 'object' does not 
    //contain a definition for 'First'.
    //IDictionary<String, object> x0 = repo.Find(proc, param).First();

    //this succeeds:
    IDictionary<String, object> x0 = repo.Find(proc, new { Id = "asdf" }).First();

    IEnumerable<DateTime> qry2
       = x0.Values.AsQueryable()
           .Where(x => x != null)
           .Select(x => (DateTime) x);
    return qry2;
}

Here are the signatures for Find and Query:

//Repository::Find
public IEnumerable<dynamic> Find(string procName, object param = null)

//Dapper SqlMapper::Query
public static IEnumerable<dynamic> Query(this IDbConnection cnn, string sql, dynamic param = null, IDbTransaction transaction = null, bool buffered = true, int? commandTimeout = null, CommandType? commandType = null)
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  • When I look at the answers and you comments I think that repo.Find returns an object, but it could (and should) be changed into returning an IEnumerable<IDictionary<string, object>>, which is the return type of Dapper's Query method. FastExpando (in the current source changed to DapperRow) implements IDictionary<string, object>. – Gert Arnold Apr 17 '13 at 20:20
  • @GertArnold, @ofstream - it appears to be a subtle issue with the Dapper wrapper. It's signature is public IEnumerable<dynamic> Find(string procName, object param = null) while the Dapper signature is public static IEnumerable<dynamic> Query(this IDbConnection cnn, string sql, dynamic param = null, IDbTransaction transaction = null, bool buffered = true, int? commandTimeout = null, CommandType? commandType = null) so it looks like there is a type conversion going on from object to dynamic for the param argument. I think changing the wrapper signature to dynamic param should fix it. – Jay Walker Apr 17 '13 at 20:40
  • It is the return parameter that matters. .Cast<IDictionary<String, Object>>() should work (Servy's answer). – Gert Arnold Apr 17 '13 at 20:50
  • Please see update to my Question. It is an issue with the dynamic param – Jay Walker Apr 17 '13 at 21:08
  • When an input parameter changes the output there must be an overload of Find. – Gert Arnold Apr 17 '13 at 21:21
2

You can use the LINQ Cast method to cast each item in the sequence.

List<IDictionary<String, Object>> data = repo.Find(proc, param)
    .AsEnumerable()
    .Cast<IDictionary<String, Object>>()
    .ToList();
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  • I get a RuntimeBinderException on that line: 'object' does not contain a definition for 'Cast' – Jay Walker Apr 17 '13 at 17:57
  • 1
    @JayWalker Add in an AsEnumerable if it's actually an IQueryable and not an IEnumerable. – Servy Apr 17 '13 at 17:58
  • With that change I get: 'object' does not contain a definition for 'AsEnumerable'. repo.Find returns an IEnumerable<dynamic>. I also changed to var data and got same Exception. – Jay Walker Apr 17 '13 at 18:00
  • @Servy That method returns object. – It'sNotALie. Apr 17 '13 at 18:03
1

Repo.Find does not return an IEnumerable<dynamic>. It returns object. If you are sure it will always return a List<IDictionary<String, Object>> just do this:

List<IDictionary<String, Object>> x5 = (List<IDictionary<String, Object>>)repo.Find(proc, param);
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  • I get a RuntimeBinderException of 'object' does not contain a definition for 'AsEnumerable'. Looks like the runtime type is: System.Collections.Generic.List<Dapper.SqlMapper.FastExpando> when I use var x5 = repo.Find() – Jay Walker Apr 17 '13 at 18:28
  • Please see update to my Question. It is an issue with the dynamic param – Jay Walker Apr 17 '13 at 21:07
  • That is REALLY odd. I'll see if I can find out why. – It'sNotALie. Apr 17 '13 at 21:41
1

So the problem is that by specifying param as dynamic causes the method to be dynamically invoked and extension methods can no longer be chained.

So you could just use var instead of dynamic:

 var param = new { Id = "asdf" };
 var data = repo.Find(proc, param)
.Cast<IDictionary<String, Object>>()
.ToList();

Or just cast the dynamic param to object before invoking:

 var data = repo.Find(proc, (object)param)
.Cast<IDictionary<String, Object>>()
.ToList();

Or if Find really is returning a runtime type of System.Collections.Generic.List<Dapper.SqlMapper.FastExpando> just cast the result to dynamic to make sure that it uses it's runtime type before assigning it, and it is important to assign to IEnumerable<> specifically because it is a co-variant type (IList<> or List<> will fail).

IEnumerable<IDictionary<String, Object>> data = (dynamic) repo.Find(proc, param);
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0

Solution

Don't pass back dynamic from your method. Dapper has a ToList< T > extension method, so you can cast to any supported type. In this case if you really need the low level associative array, pass back List< Dictionary < string, object > >.

It's also worth noting C# dynamic does not marshal across assembly boundaries, so that may have potentially been an issue you encountered. If you're marshaling across assemblies, you'd want to use Expando, List< Dictionary < string, object > >, or some other type that is referenced by both assemblies.

Explanation

Here's an older version of the Dapper SQLMapper source that includes FastExpando (line 941). Notice the class definition for FastExpando.

private class FastExpando : System.Dynamic.DynamicObject, IDictionary< string, object >

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  • 1
    Not sure why DapperDev team made FastExpando private. There are use cases for flowing data from a relational DB, applying some light data massaging, and then sending on to a NO-SQL store. Making FastExpando a first-class citizen would make these sorts of scenarios a little less opaque to deal with. – Allan McLemore Sep 10 '14 at 3:10

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