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I am using Hammer.js to capture touchscreen events in a Backbone View. Hammer has a special syntax for adding touch listeners, which I have been using in the View's initialize function:

$("#next-button").hammer({prevent_default: true}).on('tap', $.proxy(this.next, this));

I would rather add it to the standard events object, like this:

events: {"tap #next-button":"next"}

So I hacked the end of Backbone.View's delegateEvents method:

var isMobileEvent=["tap", "doubleTap"].indexOf(eventName)!=-1;
        if (selector === '') {
            if (isMobileEvent){
                this.$el.hammer({prevent_default: true}).on(eventName, method);
            } else {
                this.$el.on(eventName, method);
            }
        } else {
            if (isMobileEvent){
                this.$el.hammer({prevent_default: true}).on(eventName, selector, method);
            } else {
                this.$el.on(eventName, selector, method);
            }

        }

This works fine. But when I tried to override the method in the one View where it was needed the override (worried that I would forget about this hack in Backbone, or overwrite it with a new version of Backbone, etc.), delegateEvents for my View stopped working. The problem is that the method callback is not recognized as a method:

if (!_.isFunction(method)) method = this[events[key]];

Why? I literally copy and pasted the function into the View subclass. Here is the whole delegateEvents that works in Backbone, but not in my Backbone.View:

delegateEvents: function(events) {
      if (!(events || (events = _.result(this, 'events')))) return;
      this.undelegateEvents();
      for (var key in events) {
        var method = events[key];
        if (!_.isFunction(method)) method = this[events[key]];
        if (!method) throw new Error('Method "' + events[key] + '" does not exist');
        var match = key.match(delegateEventSplitter);
        var eventName = match[1], selector = match[2];
        method = _.bind(method, this);
        eventName += '.delegateEvents' + this.cid;
        var isMobileEvent=["tap", "doubleTap"].indexOf(eventName)!=-1;
        if (selector === '') {
            if (isMobileEvent){
                this.$el.hammer({prevent_default: true}).on(eventName, method);
            } else {
                this.$el.on(eventName, method);
            }
        } else {
            if (isMobileEvent){
                this.$el.hammer({prevent_default: true}).on(eventName, selector, method);
            } else {
                this.$el.on(eventName, selector, method);
            }

        }
      }

THE FIX:

Replace this line:

var match = key.match(delegateEventSplitter);

with this one:

var match = key.match(/^(\S+)\s*(.*)$/);
  • How did you override it? – Loamhoof Apr 17 '13 at 19:09
  • Do you have a next function/method in your View class? – WiredPrairie Apr 17 '13 at 19:29
  • @Loamhoof I simply added a delegateEvents method to the View subclass. I've never overridden a js function or a Backbone one, either. Would this be sufficient? Code in other StackOverflow posts seemed to follow this pattern. – Matt Garland Apr 17 '13 at 19:30
  • 1
    Where are you declaring delegateEventSplitter? I copied the delegateEvents code into a subclass View here and it worked, after I copied the value of that variable. jsbin.com/iqibur/1/edit – WiredPrairie Apr 17 '13 at 19:44
  • 1
    "JS is confusing me." => that's why I love it ;) So first, if delegateEventSplitter was declared inside Backbone.View as var delegateEventSplitter = /^(\S+)\s*(.*)$/; it wouldn't change anything, that'd be a private var, and only the constructor and the methods declared within the constructor (not the prototype ones) would have access to it, scope problem. Now about scopes, basically you'll never have access to Backbone's scope as you need to define things within a scope to have access to it :) – Loamhoof Apr 17 '13 at 22:10
1

This jsbin shows how it is possible to override the default Backbone View logic for delegateEvents.

You can easily extend it as needed to handle Hammer.JS as you had above to extend Backbone to support the various touch events.

I needed to copy the value of delegateEventSplitter locally as it's privately declared (within a closure) inside of the Backbone library. Only functions that were executed/returned within the context of that variable are able to access that value. Since your new class does not execute in that context, it's unable to directly access the value.

The relevant code:

var SampleView = Backbone.View.extend({
  events: {
    "click" : '_clicked' 
  },

delegateEvents: function(events) {
      if (!(events || (events = _.result(this, 'events')))) return;
      this.undelegateEvents();
      for (var key in events) {
        var method = events[key];
        if (!_.isFunction(method)) method = this[events[key]];
        if (!method) throw new Error('Method "' + events[key] + '" does not exist');
        var match = key.match(/^(\S+)\s*(.*)$/);
        var eventName = match[1], selector = match[2];
        method = _.bind(method, this);
        eventName += '.delegateEvents' + this.cid;
        if (selector === '') {
           this.$el.on(eventName, method);
        } else {
           this.$el.on(eventName, selector, method);
        }
      }  
},

  render: function() {        
     this.$el.html("hi");
     return this; 
  },        
  _clicked: function() {
     alert("clicked!"); 
  }
});

// assumes there's an element with an id of "content"
$(function() {
  var view = new SampleView();
  $("#content").append(view.render().$el);  
});

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