768

I'm converting something from VB into C#. Having a problem with the syntax of this statement:

if ((searchResult.Properties["user"].Count > 0))
{
    profile.User = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString(searchResult.Properties["user"][0]);
}

I then see the following errors:

Argument 1: cannot convert from 'object' to 'byte[]'

The best overloaded method match for 'System.Text.Encoding.GetString(byte[])' has some invalid arguments

I tried to fix the code based on this post, but still no success

string User = Encoding.UTF8.GetString("user", 0);

Any suggestions?

7
  • 2
    What is the type of searchResult.Properties["user"][0] ? Try casting it to byte[] first – mshsayem Apr 18 '13 at 0:54
  • mshsayem went where I was going. Are you missing a cast to a (byte[]) on the searchResult? – Harrison Apr 18 '13 at 0:56
  • How would I go about doing that in my case? My knowledge of C# syntax is pretty limited to be honest. – nouptime Apr 18 '13 at 1:26
  • 3
    You need to find out what type Properties["user"][0] is. If you're sure it's a byte array then you can cast like this profile.User = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString((byte[])searchResult.Properties["user"][0]); – keyboardP Apr 18 '13 at 1:32
  • 2
    Turns out there was no need for all that fuss. The username could be fetched without encoding after all. – nouptime Mar 14 '14 at 8:10

17 Answers 17

1367
+200

If you already have a byte array then you will need to know what type of encoding was used to make it into that byte array.

For example, if the byte array was created like this:

byte[] bytes = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(someString);

You will need to turn it back into a string like this:

string someString = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(bytes);

If you can find in the code you inherited, the encoding used to create the byte array then you should be set.

7
  • 4
    Timothy, I've looked through the VB code and I can't seem to find a byte array as you have mentioned. – nouptime Apr 18 '13 at 1:06
  • On your search result, what is the type of the Properties property? – Timothy Randall Apr 18 '13 at 1:09
  • All I can see is that there are a number items attached to Properties as a string. I'm not sure if that's what you were asking me though. – nouptime Apr 18 '13 at 1:24
  • 24
    @AndiAR try Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(somestring) – OzBob Dec 5 '16 at 4:24
  • 1
    For my situation I found that Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes worked (but ASCII didn't) – Jeff May 11 '18 at 16:29
116

First of all, add the System.Text namespace

using System.Text;

Then use this code

string input = "some text"; 
byte[] array = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(input);

Hope to fix it!

47

Also you can use an Extension Method to add a method to the string type as below:

static class Helper
{
   public static byte[] ToByteArray(this string str)
   {
      return System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(str);
   }
}

And use it like below:

string foo = "bla bla";
byte[] result = foo.ToByteArray();
1
  • 17
    I'd rename that method to include the fact that it's using ASCII encoding. Something like ToASCIIByteArray. I hate when I find out some library I'm using uses ASCII and I'm assuming it's using UTF-8 or something more modern. – T Blank Sep 8 '17 at 18:10
42
var result = System.Text.Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(text);
2
  • 4
    This should be the accepted answer, as the other answers suggest ASCII, but the encoding is either Unicode (which it UTF16) or UTF8. – Abel Dec 26 '18 at 21:57
  • Indeed, @Abel. The C# currently uses UTF-16 as default and encoding such makes sense more than ASCII. Depends of project of course, but this is default. – F8ER Oct 7 '20 at 4:56
36

Encoding.Default should not be used...

@Randall's answer uses Encoding.Default, however Microsoft raises a warning against it:

Different computers can use different encodings as the default, and the default encoding can change on a single computer. If you use the Default encoding to encode and decode data streamed between computers or retrieved at different times on the same computer, it may translate that data incorrectly. In addition, the encoding returned by the Default property uses best-fit fallback to map unsupported characters to characters supported by the code page. For these reasons, using the default encoding is not recommended. To ensure that encoded bytes are decoded properly, you should use a Unicode encoding, such as UTF8Encoding or UnicodeEncoding. You could also use a higher-level protocol to ensure that the same format is used for encoding and decoding.

To check what the default encoding is, use Encoding.Default.WindowsCodePage (1250 in my case - and sadly, there is no predefined class of CP1250 encoding, but the object could be retrieved as Encoding.GetEncoding(1250)).

...UTF-8 encoding should be used instead...

Encoding.ASCII is 7bit, so it doesn't work either, in my case:

byte[] pass = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes("šarže");
Console.WriteLine(Encoding.ASCII.GetString(pass)); // ?ar?e

Following Microsoft's recommendation:

var utf8 = new UTF8Encoding();
byte[] pass = utf8.GetBytes("šarže");
Console.WriteLine(utf8.GetString(pass)); // šarže

Encoding.UTF8 recommended by others is an instance uf UTF-8 encoding and can be also used directly or as

var utf8 = Encoding.UTF8 as UTF8Encoding;

...but it is not used always

Default encoding is misleading: .NET uses UTF-8 everywhere (including strings hardcoded in the source code), but Windows actually uses 2 other non-UTF8 non-standard defaults: ANSI codepage (for GUI apps before .NET) and OEM codepage (aka DOS standard). These differs from country to country (for instance, Windows Czech edition uses CP1250 and CP852) and are oftentimes hardcoded in windows API libraries. So if you just set UTF-8 to console by chcp 65001 (as .NET implicitly does and pretends it is the default) and run some localized command (like ping), it works in English version, but you get tofu text in Czech Republic.

Let me share my real world experience: I created WinForms application customizing git scripts for teachers. The output is obtained on the background anynchronously by a process described by Microsoft as (bold text added by me):

The word "shell" in this context (UseShellExecute) refers to a graphical shell (ANSI CP) (similar to the Windows shell) rather than command shells (for example, bash or sh) (OEM CP) and lets users launch graphical applications or open documents (with messed output in non-US environment).

So effectively GUI defaults to UTF-8, process defaults to CP1250 and console defaults to 852. So the output is in 852 interpreted as UTF-8 interpreted as CP1250. I got tofu text from which I could not deduce the original codepage due to the double conversion. I was pulling my hair for a week to figure out to explicitly set UTF-8 for process script and convert the output from CP1250 to UTF-8 in the main thread. Now it works here in the Eastern Europe, but Western Europe Windows uses 1252. ANSI CP is not determined easily as many commands like systeminfo are also localized and other methods differs from version to version: in such environment displaying national characters reliably is almost unfeasible.

So until the half of 21st century, please DO NOT use any "Default Codepage" and set it explicitly (to UTF-8 if possible).

33
static byte[] GetBytes(string str)
{
     byte[] bytes = new byte[str.Length * sizeof(char)];
     System.Buffer.BlockCopy(str.ToCharArray(), 0, bytes, 0, bytes.Length);
     return bytes;
}

static string GetString(byte[] bytes)
{
     char[] chars = new char[bytes.Length / sizeof(char)];
     System.Buffer.BlockCopy(bytes, 0, chars, 0, bytes.Length);
     return new string(chars);
}
3
  • 1
    This will fail for characters that fall into the surrogate pair range.. GetBytes will have a byte array that misses one normal char per surrogate pair off the end. The GetString will have empty chars at the end. The only way it would work is if microsoft's default were UTF32, or if characters in the surrogate pair range were not allowed. Or is there something I'm not seeing? The proper way is to 'encode' the string into bytes. – Gerard ONeill Feb 17 '17 at 17:31
  • Correct, for a wider range you can use something similar to #Timothy Randall's solution: using System; using System.Text; namespace Example{ public class Program { public static void Main(string[] args) { string s1 = "Hello World"; string s2 = "שלום עולם"; string s3 = "你好,世界!"; Console.WriteLine(Encoding.UTF8.GetString(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(s1))); Console.WriteLine(Encoding.UTF8.GetString(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(s2))); Console.WriteLine(Encoding.UTF8.GetString(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(s3))); } } } – Eran Yogev Feb 17 '17 at 20:03
  • @EranYogev why it should fail? I have tested it for the whole range of System.Int32 and it was correct. Can you please explain here or in this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/64077979/… – astef Sep 26 '20 at 13:05
13

Building off Ali's answer, I would recommend an extension method that allows you to optionally pass in the encoding you want to use:

using System.Text;
public static class StringExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Creates a byte array from the string, using the 
    /// System.Text.Encoding.Default encoding unless another is specified.
    /// </summary>
    public static byte[] ToByteArray(this string str, Encoding encoding = Encoding.Default)
    {
        return encoding.GetBytes(str);
    }
}

And use it like below:

string foo = "bla bla";

// default encoding
byte[] default = foo.ToByteArray();

// custom encoding
byte[] unicode = foo.ToByteArray(Encoding.Unicode);
1
  • 4
    Note that using Encoding encoding = Encoding.Default results in a compile time error: CS1736 Default parameter value for 'encoding' must be a compile-time constant – Douglas Gaskell Jun 17 '19 at 19:42
11

use this

byte[] myByte= System.Text.ASCIIEncoding.Default.GetBytes(myString);
11

The following approach will work only if the chars are 1 byte. (Default unicode will not work since it is 2 bytes)

public static byte[] ToByteArray(string value)
{            
    char[] charArr = value.ToCharArray();
    byte[] bytes = new byte[charArr.Length];
    for (int i = 0; i < charArr.Length; i++)
    {
        byte current = Convert.ToByte(charArr[i]);
        bytes[i] = current;
    }

    return bytes;
}

Keeping it simple

6
  • char and string are UTF-16 by definition. – Tom Blodget Mar 4 '16 at 23:37
  • Yes the default is UTF-16. I am not making any assumptions on Encoding of the input string. – Mandar Sudame Mar 6 '16 at 20:06
  • There is no text but encoded text. Your input is type string and is therefore UTF-16. UTF-16 is not the default; there is no choice about it. You then split into char[], UTF-16 code units. You then call Convert.ToByte(Char), which just happens to convert U+0000 to U+00FF to ISO-8859-1, and mangles any other codepoints. – Tom Blodget Mar 6 '16 at 20:55
  • Makes sense. Thanks for the clarification. Updating my answer. – Mandar Sudame Mar 8 '16 at 19:56
  • 1
    I think you are still missing several essential points. Focus on char being 16 bits and Convert.ToByte() throwing half of them away. – Tom Blodget Mar 9 '16 at 1:23
7

A refinement to JustinStolle's edit (Eran Yogev's use of BlockCopy).

The proposed solution is indeed faster than using Encoding. Problem is that it doesn't work for encoding byte arrays of uneven length. As given, it raises an out-of-bound exception. Increasing the length by 1 leaves a trailing byte when decoding from string.

For me, the need came when I wanted to encode from DataTable to JSON. I was looking for a way to encode binary fields into strings and decode from string back to byte[].

I therefore created two classes - one that wraps the above solution (when encoding from strings it's fine, because the lengths are always even), and another that handles byte[] encoding.

I solved the uneven length problem by adding a single character that tells me if the original length of the binary array was odd ('1') or even ('0')

As follows:

public static class StringEncoder
{
    static byte[] EncodeToBytes(string str)
    {
        byte[] bytes = new byte[str.Length * sizeof(char)];
        System.Buffer.BlockCopy(str.ToCharArray(), 0, bytes, 0, bytes.Length);
        return bytes;
    }
    static string DecodeToString(byte[] bytes)
    {
        char[] chars = new char[bytes.Length / sizeof(char)];
        System.Buffer.BlockCopy(bytes, 0, chars, 0, bytes.Length);
        return new string(chars);
    }
}

public static class BytesEncoder
{
    public static string EncodeToString(byte[] bytes)
    {
        bool even = (bytes.Length % 2 == 0);
        char[] chars = new char[1 + bytes.Length / sizeof(char) + (even ? 0 : 1)];
        chars[0] = (even ? '0' : '1');
        System.Buffer.BlockCopy(bytes, 0, chars, 2, bytes.Length);

        return new string(chars);
    }
    public static byte[] DecodeToBytes(string str)
    {
        bool even = str[0] == '0';
        byte[] bytes = new byte[(str.Length - 1) * sizeof(char) + (even ? 0 : -1)];
        char[] chars = str.ToCharArray();
        System.Buffer.BlockCopy(chars, 2, bytes, 0, bytes.Length);

        return bytes;
    }
}
7

This what worked for me

byte[] bytes = Convert.FromBase64String(textString);

And in reverse:

string str = Convert.ToBase64String(bytes);
1
4

This question has been answered sufficiently many times, but with C# 7.2 and the introduction of the Span type, there is a faster way to do this in unsafe code:

public static class StringSupport
{
    private static readonly int _charSize = sizeof(char);

    public static unsafe byte[] GetBytes(string str)
    {
        if (str == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(str));
        if (str.Length == 0) return new byte[0];

        fixed (char* p = str)
        {
            return new Span<byte>(p, str.Length * _charSize).ToArray();
        }
    }

    public static unsafe string GetString(byte[] bytes)
    {
        if (bytes == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(bytes));
        if (bytes.Length % _charSize != 0) throw new ArgumentException($"Invalid {nameof(bytes)} length");
        if (bytes.Length == 0) return string.Empty;

        fixed (byte* p = bytes)
        {
            return new string(new Span<char>(p, bytes.Length / _charSize));
        }
    }
}

Keep in mind that the bytes represent a UTF-16 encoded string (called "Unicode" in C# land).

Some quick benchmarking shows that the above methods are roughly 5x faster than their Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(...)/GetString(...) implementations for medium sized strings (30-50 chars), and even faster for larger strings. These methods also seem to be faster than using pointers with Marshal.Copy(..) or Buffer.MemoryCopy(...).

4

You could use MemoryMarshal API to perform very fast and efficient conversion. String will implicitly be cast to ReadOnlySpan<byte>, as MemoryMarshal.Cast accepts either Span<byte> or ReadOnlySpan<byte> as an input parameter.

public static class StringExtensions
{
    public static byte[] ToByteArray(this string s) => s.ToByteSpan().ToArray(); //  heap allocation, use only when you cannot operate on spans
    public static ReadOnlySpan<byte> ToByteSpan(this string s) => MemoryMarshal.Cast<char, byte>(s);
}

Following benchmark shows the difference:

Input: "Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s,"

|                       Method |       Mean |     Error |    StdDev |  Gen 0 | Gen 1 | Gen 2 | Allocated |
|----------------------------- |-----------:|----------:|----------:|-------:|------:|------:|----------:|
| UsingEncodingUnicodeGetBytes | 160.042 ns | 3.2864 ns | 6.4099 ns | 0.0780 |     - |     - |     328 B |
| UsingMemoryMarshalAndToArray |  31.977 ns | 0.7177 ns | 1.5753 ns | 0.0781 |     - |     - |     328 B |
|           UsingMemoryMarshal |   1.027 ns | 0.0565 ns | 0.1630 ns |      - |     - |     - |         - |
3

Does anyone see any reason why not to do this?

mystring.Select(Convert.ToByte).ToArray()
1
  • 10
    Convert.ToByte(char) doesn't work like you think it would. The character '2' is converted to the byte 2, not the byte that represents the character '2'. Use mystring.Select(x => (byte)x).ToArray() instead. – Jack Aug 2 '17 at 18:50
3

If the result of, 'searchResult.Properties [ "user" ] [ 0 ]', is a string:

if ( ( searchResult.Properties [ "user" ].Count > 0 ) ) {

   profile.User = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8.GetString ( searchResult.Properties [ "user" ] [ 0 ].ToCharArray ().Select ( character => ( byte ) character ).ToArray () );

}

The key point being that converting a string to a byte [] can be done using LINQ:

.ToCharArray ().Select ( character => ( byte ) character ).ToArray () )

And the inverse:

.Select ( character => ( char ) character ).ToArray () )
0

This work for me, after that I could convert put my picture in a bytea field in my database.

using (MemoryStream s = new MemoryStream(DirEntry.Properties["thumbnailphoto"].Value as byte[]))
{
    return s.ToArray();
}
0

This has been answered quite a lot, but for me, the only working method is this one:

    public static byte[] StringToByteArray(string str)
    {
        byte[] array = Convert.FromBase64String(str);
        return array;
    }

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