11

I'm trying to improve the responsiveness of a WPF business application so that when users are "between" screens waiting for a new screen to appear after a server response, they can still be entering data. I'm able to queue the events (using a PreviewKeyDown event handler on background panel) but then I'm having difficulties just throwing the events I dequeue back at the new panel once it's loaded. In particular TextBoxes on the new panel are not picking up the text. I've tried raising the same events (setting Handled to true when capturing them, setting Handled to false when raising them again) creating new KeyDown events, new PreviewKeyDown events, doing ProcessInput, doing RaiseEvent on the panel, setting the focus on the right TextBox and doing RaiseEvent on the TextBox, many things.

It seems like it should be really simple, but I can't figure it out.

Here are some of the things I've tried. Consider a Queue of KeyEventArgs called EventQ:

Here's one thing that doesn't work:

        while (EventQ.Count > 0)
        {
            KeyEventArgs kea = EventQ.Dequeue();
            tbOne.Focus(); // tbOne is a text box
            kea.Handled = false;
            this.RaiseEvent(kea);
        }

Here's another:

        while (EventQ.Count > 0)
        {
            KeyEventArgs kea = EventQ.Dequeue();
            tbOne.Focus(); // tbOne is a text box
            var key = kea.Key;                    // Key to send
            var routedEvent = Keyboard.PreviewKeyDownEvent; // Event to send
            KeyEventArgs keanew = new KeyEventArgs(
                Keyboard.PrimaryDevice,
                PresentationSource.FromVisual(this),
                0,
                key) { RoutedEvent = routedEvent, Handled = false };

            InputManager.Current.ProcessInput(keanew);
        }

And another:

        while (EventQ.Count > 0)
        {
            KeyEventArgs kea = EventQ.Dequeue();
            tbOne.Focus(); // tbOne is a text box
            var key = kea.Key;                    // Key to send
            var routedEvent = Keyboard.PreviewKeyDownEvent; // Event to send
            this.RaiseEvent(
              new KeyEventArgs(
                Keyboard.PrimaryDevice,
                PresentationSource.FromVisual(this),
                0,
                key) { RoutedEvent = routedEvent, Handled = false }
            );
        }

One strange thing I've noticed is that when using the InputManager method (#2) spaces do appear. But normal text keys do not.

8
  • msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms741870.aspx maybe you need different thread model? Such as two UI threads, so you wont have to raise events Commented Apr 18, 2013 at 7:22
  • @Erti-ChrisEelmaa I may not have been clear in my OP but I need to show new screens, not the same screen. It's not a background process that's running, it's the screen goes blank until the server responds. When the server responds, a new screen with completely new components is shown, and any typing the user has done in the meantime should be thrown at the new screen. I am also confused by your reference to "two UI threads" I thought WPF was all STA?
    – Mishax
    Commented Apr 18, 2013 at 7:33
  • Do you really need to do it with events, can't you simply set the text ? Commented Apr 18, 2013 at 8:25
  • @LukeMarlin yes, I have a lot of non-standard cursor navigation and function keys linked to Commands that work now, I'd like to have a single handling for all of these events because these are tested and they work. Also, text is more difficult than you might imagine because I need to move the cursor from one field to the next, get capitalization right, etc. I want to reuse what is already there and works
    – Mishax
    Commented Apr 18, 2013 at 8:36
  • Can you show how you try to send the key events ? Commented Apr 18, 2013 at 8:39

3 Answers 3

10
+50

The same resources turned up for me when I did some research, so I think what you do in your answer is pretty valid.

I looked on and have found another way of doing it, using the Win32 API. I had to introduce some threading and small delays, because for some reason the key events were not replayed in the correct sequence without that. Overall I think this solution is easier though, and I also figured out how to include modifier keys (by using the Get/SetKeyboardState function). Uppercase is working, and so should keyboard shortcuts.

Starting the demo app, pressing the keys 1 space 2 space 3 tab 4 space 5 space 6, then clicking the button produces the following:

enter image description here

Xaml:

<UserControl x:Class="WpfApplication1.KeyEventQueueDemo"
             xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
             xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
             xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006" 
             xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008" 
             mc:Ignorable="d" d:DesignHeight="300" d:DesignWidth="300" >

    <StackPanel>
        <TextBox x:Name="tbOne" Margin="5,2" />
        <TextBox x:Name="tbTwo" Margin="5,2" />
        <Button x:Name="btn" Content="Replay key events" Margin="5,2" />
    </StackPanel>
</UserControl>

Code behind:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;
using System.Windows.Input;
using System.Windows.Interop;

namespace WpfApplication1
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Structure that defines key input with modifier keys
    /// </summary>
    public struct KeyAndState
    {
        public int Key;
        public byte[] KeyboardState;

        public KeyAndState(int key, byte[] state)
        {
            Key = key;
            KeyboardState = state;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Demo to illustrate storing keyboard input and playing it back at a later stage
    /// </summary>
    public partial class KeyEventQueueDemo : UserControl
    {
        private const int WM_KEYDOWN = 0x0100;

        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        static extern bool PostMessage(IntPtr hWnd, UInt32 Msg, int wParam, int lParam);

        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        static extern bool GetKeyboardState(byte[] lpKeyState);

        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        static extern bool SetKeyboardState(byte[] lpKeyState);

        private IntPtr _handle;
        private bool _isMonitoring = true;

        private Queue<KeyAndState> _eventQ = new Queue<KeyAndState>();

        public KeyEventQueueDemo()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            this.Focusable = true;
            this.Loaded += KeyEventQueueDemo_Loaded;
            this.PreviewKeyDown += KeyEventQueueDemo_PreviewKeyDown;
            this.btn.Click += (s, e) => ReplayKeyEvents();
        }

        void KeyEventQueueDemo_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            this.Focus(); // necessary to detect previewkeydown event
            SetFocusable(false); // for demo purpose only, so controls do not get focus at tab key

            // getting window handle
            HwndSource source = (HwndSource)HwndSource.FromVisual(this);
            _handle = source.Handle;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Get key and keyboard state (modifier keys), store them in a queue
        /// </summary>
        void KeyEventQueueDemo_PreviewKeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
        {
            if (_isMonitoring)
            {
                int key = KeyInterop.VirtualKeyFromKey(e.Key);
                byte[] state = new byte[256];
                GetKeyboardState(state); 
                _eventQ.Enqueue(new KeyAndState(key, state));
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Replay key events from queue
        /// </summary>
        private void ReplayKeyEvents()
        {
            _isMonitoring = false; // no longer add to queue
            SetFocusable(true); // allow controls to take focus now (demo purpose only)

            MoveFocus(new TraversalRequest(FocusNavigationDirection.Next)); // set focus to first control

            // thread the dequeueing, because the sequence of inputs is not preserved 
            // unless a small delay between them is introduced. Normally the effect this
            // produces should be very acceptable for an UI.
            Task.Run(() =>
            {
                while (_eventQ.Count > 0)
                {
                    KeyAndState keyAndState = _eventQ.Dequeue();

                    Application.Current.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke((Action)(() =>
                    {
                        SetKeyboardState(keyAndState.KeyboardState); // set stored keyboard state
                        PostMessage(_handle, WM_KEYDOWN, keyAndState.Key, 0);
                    }));

                    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(5); // might need adjustment
                }
            });
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Prevent controls from getting focus and taking the input until requested
        /// </summary>
        private void SetFocusable(bool isFocusable)
        {
            tbOne.Focusable = isFocusable;
            tbTwo.Focusable = isFocusable;
            btn.Focusable = isFocusable;
        }
    }
}
2
  • Hi, this looks very good. I've made a slight adjustment by using the BackgroundWorker instead of the Task.Run in order to get better compatibility wiht .NET 3 and 4. This gives good results!
    – Mishax
    Commented Apr 28, 2013 at 7:55
  • That's correct, the Task API is only available from .NET 4. You could replace Task.Run(() => with ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem((o) => for an earlier .NET version, I'd prefer that over the BackgroundWorker because of the succinct syntax.
    – Mike Fuchs
    Commented Apr 28, 2013 at 9:49
3

The enqueue system is something that I've wanted to do myself, as part of my project which allows multi-threaded UI to function without any problems(one thread routes events into another). There is only slight problem, namely WPF does not have public API to inject INPUT events. Here is a copy/paste from one of the Microsoft employees that I talked with, like weeks back:

"WPF does not expose public methods for injecting input events in the proper way. This scenario is just not supported by the public API. You will probably have to do a lot of reflection and other hacking. For example, WPF treats some input as “trusted” because it knows it came from the message pump. If you just raise an input event, the event will not be trusted."

I think you need to rethink your strategy.

1
1

Thanks all for your support but I haven't really struck a solution from the SO community so I'm going to answer this myself since this is the closest I seem to get to a solution. The "hack" as Erti-Chris says seems to be what we're left with. I've had some luck decomposing the problem so I don't have the sense I'm writing a whole new keyboard handler. The approach I'm following is to decompose the events into a combination of InputManager handling and of TextComposition. Throwing a KeyEventArgs (either the original one or one I've created myself) doesn't seem to register on a PreviewKeyDown handler.

Part of the difficulty comes from the information in Erti-Chris's post, and another part seems to be related to TextBoxes trying to react to certain keys like arrow keys differently from normal keys like the letter "A".

To move forward with this I found information from this post to be useful:

http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/wpf/thread/b657618e-7fc6-4e6b-9b62-1ffca25d186b

Here is the solution that I'm getting some positive results from now:

    Keyboard.Focus(tbOne); // the first element on the Panel to get the focus
    while (EventQ.Count > 0) 
    {
        KeyEventArgs kea = EventQ.Dequeue();
        kea.Handled = false;
        var routedEvent = KeyDownEvent; 

        KeyEventArgs keanew = new KeyEventArgs(
                     Keyboard.PrimaryDevice,
                     PresentationSource.FromVisual(tbOne),
                     kea.Timestamp,
                     kea.Key) { RoutedEvent = routedEvent, Handled = false };
        keanew.Source = tbOne;

        bool itWorked = InputManager.Current.ProcessInput(keanew);
        if (itWorked)
        {
            continue;
            // at this point spaces, backspaces, tabs, arrow keys, deletes are handled
        }
        else
        {
            String keyChar = kea.Key.ToString();
            if (keyChar.Length > 1)
            {
                // handle special keys; letters are one length
                if (keyChar == "OemPeriod") keyChar = ".";
                if (keyChar == "OemComma") keyChar = ",";
            }
            TextCompositionManager.StartComposition(new TextComposition(InputManager.Current, Keyboard.FocusedElement, keyChar));
        }
    }

If anyone can show me a better way I'm delighted to mark your contribution as the answer, but for now this is what I'm working with.

1
  • You would have to add special treatment for numbers, they show up as D1, D2, ... Also, if one of the keys was a tab, advancing the cursor, tbOne needs to be replaced by the control taking focus.
    – Mike Fuchs
    Commented Apr 27, 2013 at 17:50

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