109


I have the following data in a Table
PriceOrderShipped
PriceOrderShippedInbound
PriceOrderShippedOutbound

In SQL I need to write a query which searches for a string in a table. While searching for a string it should ignore case. For the below mentioned SQL query

SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE COL_NAME LIKE '%PriceOrder%' 

gives all the above data, whereas

SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE COL_NAME LIKE '%Priceorder%' 

doesn't give.

Eg. when I search for 'PriceOrder' or 'priceOrder' it works but 'priceorder' or 'Priceorder' doesn't work. I have tried with the below query using COLLATE, but its not working. Do let me know where im going wrong.

SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE 
COL_NAME COLLATE latin1_general_cs LIKE '%Priceorder%'
196

Use something like this -

SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE UPPER(COL_NAME) LIKE UPPER('%PriceOrder%')

or

SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE LOWER(COL_NAME) LIKE LOWER('%PriceOrder%')
  • 14
    I think you should always compare strings capitalized (UPPER) as best practice. Google "turkish i" – Traubenfuchs Apr 18 '14 at 18:27
  • 2
    Like to know does your answer has any performance issue by converting a column value to UPPER or LOWER case then using the LIKE to search ? – stom Aug 29 '18 at 9:27
  • Actually you would have to compare both UPPER and LOWER variants because some characters have different representations in upper case but the same representation in lower case. For other characters, the opposite may be true. Java mentions the Georgian alphabet specifically as reason for doing an additional toLowerCase() in its case-insensitive comparison. – Crusha K. Rool Mar 4 at 8:52
  • Unfortunately, this approach causes a full table scan as described in this post: alvinalexander.com/sql/…. An index search can not be applied, as the filtered column is modified by the UPPER/LOWER function. – Jeff S. Jul 12 at 15:56
  • Setting a collation (before creating the index) seems to be the better approach if query performance with upper/lower is not sufficient. – Jeff S. Jul 16 at 8:40
10

See this similar question and answer to searching with case insensitivity - SQL server ignore case in a where expression

Try using something like:

SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME 
FROM myTable 
WHERE COL_NAME COLLATE SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS LIKE '%priceorder%'
  • it din't work I get SQL query not properly ended before Collate – shockwave Apr 18 '13 at 12:23
  • Sorry, I have updated my answer. – Miguel-F Apr 18 '13 at 12:26
  • @Miguel-F.. it is working fine but how does it differ from SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE COL_NAME LIKE '%priceorder%' because this is also working fine for me.. – Jishant Jun 13 '16 at 9:16
  • It did not worked for me – sinsuren Aug 9 '16 at 13:20
  • I would advice using 'SQL_Latin1_General_Cp1_CI_AS_KI_WI' instead. It's not case sensetive for a seach. – user8155123 Aug 7 at 13:21
4

You should probably use SQL_Latin1_General_Cp1_CI_AS_KI_WI as your collation. The one you specify in your question is explictly case sensitive.

You can see a list of collations here.

4

Like this.

SELECT DISTINCT COL_NAME FROM myTable WHERE COL_NAME iLIKE '%Priceorder%'

In postgresql.

  • 2
    This question is tagged sql-server so a postgres answer isn't relevant. – Liam Oct 17 '18 at 9:02

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