5

Can I be sure that an odd number in C++ should always return floor of the result when divided in such a way that there is a remainder or are there any exceptions to this? I mean:

int x = 5;
x = x/2;
cout<<x;      //2
  • 1
    yes.be sure. but why? ans standard says so in 5.6.4 – Koushik Shetty Apr 18 '13 at 16:30
  • I see, thanks a lot :) – Straightfw Apr 18 '13 at 16:32
  • 2
    If the numerator is negative then the results get hinky. – brian beuning Apr 18 '13 at 16:40
  • By 'floor' do you mean std::floor? – cgmb Apr 18 '13 at 16:53
  • @Slavik81: He does not. – Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 18 '13 at 16:54
5

yes. you can be sure of that in c++

ISO/IEC N3485(working draft) says in 5.6.4

The binary / operator yields the quotient, and the binary % operator yields 
the remainder from the division of the first expression by the second.
   If the second  operand of / or % is zero the behavior is undefined. 
For integral operands the / operator yields the algebraic quotient with any 
fractional part discarded;81 if the quotient a/b is representable in the type 
of the result, (a/b)*b + a%b is equal to a; otherwise, the behavior of both 
a/b and a%b is undefined.
2

Yes; division between integers is always integral division in C++:

[C++11 5.6/4]: The binary / operator yields the quotient, and the binary % operator yields the remainder from the division of the first expression by the second. If the second operand of / or % is zero the behavior is undefined. For integral operands the / operator yields the algebraic quotient with any fractional part discarded; if the quotient a/b is representable in the type of the result, (a/b)*b + a%b is equal to a.

2

Integer division is handled as a floor operation in C/C++.

You get 2 in the above example since the real answer 2.5 can't be represented.

Some more verbose answers here

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