69

I have an idea for a game in javascript (I'm going to make it with EaselJS) and I'll have to detect keypresses. After looking around on the internet I've seen a lot of suggestions (use window.onkeypress, use jQuery, etc.) but for almost every option there's a counterargument. What do you guys suggest? Using jQuery for this sounds easy enough but I have virtually no experience with that library (and I'm not particulary a veteran at javascript either) so I'd rather avoid it. If jQuery is the best option, can someone give a good example (with explanation would be awesome) of how to do this?

I guess this gets asked a lot but I couldn't find any clear answers. Thanks in advance!

  • 1
    I'd suggest just listening for the keypress event, or possibly one of it's counterparts (keydown or keyup) – Kevin B Apr 18 '13 at 17:25
  • start here - api.jquery.com/keypress – Mohammad Adil Apr 18 '13 at 17:25
  • 2
    jQuery is JavaScript; the only difference is that jQuery is a library that abstracts away cross-browser differences, to make it easier (but not necessarily more efficient) to write cross-browser code. – David says reinstate Monica Apr 18 '13 at 17:26
  • I suggest this: github.com/madrobby/keymaster – SeinopSys Apr 18 '13 at 17:28
93

With plain Javascript, the simplest is:

document.onkeypress = function (e) {
    e = e || window.event;
    // use e.keyCode
};

But with this, you can only bind one handler for the event.

In addition, you could use the following to be able to potentially bind multiple handlers to the same event:

addEvent(document, "keypress", function (e) {
    e = e || window.event;
    // use e.keyCode
});

function addEvent(element, eventName, callback) {
    if (element.addEventListener) {
        element.addEventListener(eventName, callback, false);
    } else if (element.attachEvent) {
        element.attachEvent("on" + eventName, callback);
    } else {
        element["on" + eventName] = callback;
    }
}

In either case, keyCode isn't consistent across browsers, so there's more to check for and figure out. Notice the e = e || window.event - that's a normal problem with Internet Explorer, putting the event in window.event instead of passing it to the callback.

References:

With jQuery:

$(document).on("keypress", function (e) {
    // use e.which
});

Reference:

Other than jQuery being a "large" library, jQuery really helps with inconsistencies between browsers, especially with window events...and that can't be denied. Hopefully it's obvious that the jQuery code I provided for your example is much more elegant and shorter, yet accomplishes what you want in a consistent way. You should be able to trust that e (the event) and e.which (the key code, for knowing which key was pressed) are accurate. In plain Javascript, it's a little harder to know unless you do everything that the jQuery library internally does.

Note there is a keydown event, that is different than keypress. You can learn more about them here: onKeyPress Vs. onKeyUp and onKeyDown

As for suggesting what to use, I would definitely suggest using jQuery if you're up for learning the framework. At the same time, I would say that you should learn Javascript's syntax, methods, features, and how to interact with the DOM. Once you understand how it works and what's happening, you should be more comfortable working with jQuery. To me, jQuery makes things more consistent and is more concise. In the end, it's Javascript, and wraps the language.

Another example of jQuery being very useful is with AJAX. Browsers are inconsistent with how AJAX requests are handled, so jQuery abstracts that so you don't have to worry.

Here's something that might help decide:

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    If you're going for cross-browser compatibility, you might need to touch on attachEvent() as well (and not my down-vote, by the way). – David says reinstate Monica Apr 18 '13 at 17:27
  • @DavidThomas Yes, I'm not there yet :) – Ian Apr 18 '13 at 17:27
  • 1
    @DavidThomas I'm not worried about downvotes, I'd rather get the right point across. Is the answer any better? I'd be happy to add/change anything – Ian Apr 18 '13 at 17:43
  • 1
    Looks solid, thanks for the explanation! I think I will go with jQuery, I've been looking into it some more and I guess it'll benefit me anyway if I learn to work with it. – bobismijnnaam Apr 18 '13 at 18:11
  • 1
    @WilliamJones That's because it's deprecated! I just checked the docs and was presented with that surprise: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Document/…. – Jose A Jun 9 '19 at 19:24
31

KEYPRESS (enter key)
Click inside the result area before you press the enter key.

Vanilla

document.addEventListener("keypress", function(event) {
  if (event.keyCode == 13) {
    alert('hi.');
  }
});

Vanilla shorthand (ES6)

this.addEventListener('keypress', event => {
  if (event.keyCode == 13) {
    alert('hi.')
  }
})

jQuery

$(this).on('keypress', function(event) {
  if (event.keyCode == 13) {
    alert('hi.')
  }
})
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

jQuery classic

$(this).keypress(function(event) {
  if (event.keyCode == 13) {
    alert('hi.')
  }
})
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

jQuery shorthand (ES6)

$(this).keypress((e) => {
  if (e.keyCode == 13)
    alert('hi.')
})
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

Even shorter (ES6)

$(this).keypress(e=>
  e.which==13?
  alert`hi.`:null
)
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

Due some requests, here an explanation:

I rewrote this answer as things have become deprecated over time so I updated it.

I used this to focus on the window scope inside the results when document is ready and for the sake of brevity but it's not necessary.

Deprecated:
The .which and .keyCode methods are actually considered deprecated so I would recommend .code but I personally still use keyCode as the performance is much faster and only that counts for me. The jQuery classic version .keypress() is not officially deprecated as some people say but they are no more preferred like .on('keypress') as it has a lot more functionality(live state, multiple handlers, etc.). The 'keypress' event in the Vanilla version is also deprecated. People should prefer beforeinput or keydown today. (Note: It has nothing to do with jQuery's events, they are called the same but execute differently.)

All examples above are no biggies regarding deprecated or not. Consoles or any browser should be able to notify you with that if this happens. And if this ever does in future, just fix it.

Readablity:
Despite the ease making it too short and snippy isn't always good either. If you work in a team, your code must be readable and detailed. I recommend the jQuery version .on('keypress'), this is the way to go and understandable by most people.

Performance:
I always follow my phrase Performance over Effectiveness as anything can be more effective if there is the option but it just should function and execute only what I want, the faster the better. This is why I prefer .keyCode even if it's considered deprecated(in most cases). It's all up to you though.

Performance Test

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19

Use event.key and modern JS!

No number codes anymore. You can use "Enter", "ArrowLeft", "r", or any key name directly, making your code far more readable.

NOTE: The old alternatives (.keyCode and .which) are Deprecated.

document.addEventListener("keypress", function onEvent(event) {
    if (event.key === "ArrowLeft") {
        // Move Left
    }
    else if (event.key === "Enter") {
        // Open Menu...
    }
});

Mozilla Docs

Supported Browsers

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  • 1
    Arrow keys are actually, "ArrowUp", "ArrowDown", "ArrowRight", "ArrowLeft" – Captain Fantastic Apr 13 '18 at 3:31
6

There are a few ways to handle that; Vanilla JavaScript can do it quite nicely:

function code(e) {
    e = e || window.event;
    return(e.keyCode || e.which);
}
window.onload = function(){
    document.onkeypress = function(e){
        var key = code(e);
        // do something with key
    };
};

Or a more structured way of handling it:

(function(d){
    var modern = (d.addEventListener), event = function(obj, evt, fn){
        if(modern) {
            obj.addEventListener(evt, fn, false);
        } else {
            obj.attachEvent("on" + evt, fn);
        }
    }, code = function(e){
        e = e || window.event;
        return(e.keyCode || e.which);
    }, init = function(){
        event(d, "keypress", function(e){
            var key = code(e);
            // do stuff with key here
        });
    };
    if(modern) {
        d.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", init, false);
    } else {
        d.attachEvent("onreadystatechange", function(){
            if(d.readyState === "complete") {
                init();
            }
        });
    }
})(document);
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1

Don't over complicate.

  document.addEventListener('keydown', logKey);
    function logKey(e) {
      if (`${e.code}` == "ArrowRight") {
        //code here
      }
          if (`${e.code}` == "ArrowLeft") {
        //code here
      }
          if (`${e.code}` == "ArrowDown") {
        //code here
      }
          if (`${e.code}` == "ArrowUp") {
        //code here
      }
    }
| improve this answer | |

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