123

I'm using the following code to detect when a dynamically generated button is clicked.

$(document).on("click",".appDetails", function () {
    alert("test");
});

Normally, if you just did $('.appDetails').click() you could use $(this) to get the element that was clicked on. How would I accomplish this with the above code?

For instance:

$(document).on("click",".appDetails", function () {
    var clickedBtnID = ??????
    alert('you clicked on button #' + clickedBtnID);
});

6 Answers 6

166

As simple as it can be

Use $(this) here too

$(document).on("click",".appDetails", function () {
   var clickedBtnID = $(this).attr('id'); // or var clickedBtnID = this.id
   alert('you clicked on button #' + clickedBtnID);
});
6
  • 1
    Looks like I'm dealing with a caching issue from the server. Sorry.
    – user736893
    Apr 18, 2013 at 19:57
  • 108
    A warning to those using ES6. Arrow functions do not set 'this' so this will be the parent. So, basically don't use an arrow function here. Aug 1, 2016 at 3:15
  • 8
    @thomas-peter I say you turn that into an answer
    – Jack
    Apr 18, 2018 at 18:41
  • 6
    @thomas-peter Saved me more dozens of minutes of frustration, thank you. May 8, 2018 at 8:20
  • 3
    @thomas-peter you just saved me! i was trying to figure out why it wasn't woking for like 30 minutes... Thank you! Feb 9, 2020 at 0:44
70

You are missing the event parameter on your function.

$(document).on("click",".appDetails", function (event) {
    alert(event.target.id);
});
1
  • 10
    This was perfect for me. It gives the element that was clicked - $(this) only gave the element that had the event attached. Jul 31, 2015 at 16:44
51

The conventional way of handling this doesn't play well with ES6. You can do this instead:

$('.delete').on('click', event => {
  const clickedElement = $(event.target);

  this.delete(clickedElement.data('id'));
});

Note that the event target will be the clicked element, which may not be the element you want (it could be a child that received the event). To get the actual element:

$('.delete').on('click', event => {
  const clickedElement = $(event.target);
  const targetElement = clickedElement.closest('.delete');

  this.delete(targetElement.data('id'));
});
1
  • 6
    You should use event.currentTarget to get the element the event is bound to. event.target is indeed the element that triggered the event. Your code clickedElement.closest('.delete'); could fail if you have multiple nested elements with this class. Mar 16, 2021 at 14:53
2

There are many ways you can do that

The first method is by using the javascript target

$(document).on("click",".appDetails", function (event) {
    var clickebtn = target.event.id;
});
1
  • event.target.id !
    – M.mhr
    Apr 2 at 8:38
1
$(".masonry__img").click((e) => {
      console.log(e.currentTarget.currentSrc);
});

This will add an onClick handler to each image with the class masonry__img.

0

A simple way is to pass the data attribute to your HTML tag.

Example:

<div data-id='tagid' class="clickElem"></div>

<script>
$(document).on("click",".appDetails", function () {
   var clickedBtnID = $(this).attr('data');
   alert('you clicked on button #' + clickedBtnID);
});
</script>
1
  • 1
    What is .appDetails here?
    – Theepag
    Jul 13, 2021 at 6:34

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