108

I'm using the following code to detect when a dynamically generated button is clicked.

$(document).on("click",".appDetails", function () {
    alert("test");
});

Normally, if you just did $('.appDetails').click() you could use $(this) to get the element that was clicked on. How would I accomplish this with the above code?

For instance:

$(document).on("click",".appDetails", function () {
    var clickedBtnID = ??????
    alert('you clicked on button #' + clickedBtnID);
});

6 Answers 6

144

As simple as it can be

Use $(this) here too

$(document).on("click",".appDetails", function () {
   var clickedBtnID = $(this).attr('id'); // or var clickedBtnID = this.id
   alert('you clicked on button #' + clickedBtnID);
});
5
  • 1
    Looks like I'm dealing with a caching issue from the server. Sorry. Apr 18, 2013 at 19:57
  • 85
    A warning to those using ES6. Arrow functions do not set 'this' so this will be the parent. So, basically don't use an arrow function here. Aug 1, 2016 at 3:15
  • 7
    @thomas-peter I say you turn that into an answer
    – Jack
    Apr 18, 2018 at 18:41
  • 5
    @thomas-peter Saved me more dozens of minutes of frustration, thank you. May 8, 2018 at 8:20
  • 3
    @thomas-peter you just saved me! i was trying to figure out why it wasn't woking for like 30 minutes... Thank you! Feb 9, 2020 at 0:44
62

You are missing the event parameter on your function.

$(document).on("click",".appDetails", function (event) {
    alert(event.target.id);
});
1
  • 7
    This was perfect for me. It gives the element that was clicked - $(this) only gave the element that had the event attached. Jul 31, 2015 at 16:44
45

The conventional way of handling this doesn't play well with ES6. You can do this instead:

$('.delete').on('click', event => {
  const clickedElement = $(event.target);

  this.delete(clickedElement.data('id'));
});

Note that the event target will be the clicked element, which may not be the element you want (it could be a child that received the event). To get the actual element:

$('.delete').on('click', event => {
  const clickedElement = $(event.target);
  const targetElement = clickedElement.closest('.delete');

  this.delete(targetElement.data('id'));
});
1
  • 1
    You should use event.currentTarget to get the element the event is bound to. event.target is indeed the element that triggered the event. Your code clickedElement.closest('.delete'); could fail if you have multiple nested elements with this class. Mar 16, 2021 at 14:53
2

There are many ways you can do that

The first method is by using the javascript target

$(document).on("click",".appDetails", function (event) {
    var clickebtn = target.event.id;
});
1
$(".masonry__img").click((e) => {
      console.log(e.currentTarget.currentSrc);
});

This will add an onClick handler to each image with the class masonry__img.

0

A simple way is to pass the data attribute to your HTML tag.

Example:

<div data-id='tagid' class="clickElem"></div>

<script>
$(document).on("click",".appDetails", function () {
   var clickedBtnID = $(this).attr('data');
   alert('you clicked on button #' + clickedBtnID);
});
</script>
1
  • 1
    What is .appDetails here?
    – Theepag
    Jul 13, 2021 at 6:34

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.