13

Here is code that implements the cd system call using C. The problem with this code is that it's not entering the if condition if(strcmp(buffer,"cd") == 0) and I can't understand why.

#include<sys/stat.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <string.h>
#include<dirent.h>
#include<error.h>

#define BUFFERSIZE 20
int main(){

char *args[80]; 
char buffer[BUFFERSIZE];
char *prompt = "OS";
char *a = ">";
printf("%s%s",prompt,a); 
fgets(buffer, BUFFERSIZE, stdin);  

char *tok; 
tok = strtok (buffer," ");


while(buffer != NULL){ 
   buffer[strlen(buffer)-1] = '\0';  
   pid_t pid;
   pid = fork();
   if(pid < 0){
      fprintf(stderr, "Fork failed");
      return 1;
   }
   else if(pid == 0){

       if(strcmp(buffer,"cd") == 0){
         tok = strtok(NULL,"\n");
         cd(tok);
       }
       printf("%s%s",prompt,a); 
       fgets(buffer, BUFFERSIZE, stdin);
   }
   else{
     wait(NULL);
   }
}
return 0;
}


int cd(char *pth){
   char path[1000];
   strcpy(path,pth);

   static char *prompt = "OS";
   static char *a = ">";
   char *token;

   char cwd[256]; 
   getcwd(cwd,sizeof(cwd));

   strcat(cwd,"/"); 
   strcat(cwd,path);
   chdir(cwd);    

   printf("%s-%s%s",prompt,path,a);
   return 0;
  }
16
  • 1
    Q: Have you looked at the value of "temp" in your debugger of choice? Is it in fact equal to "cd"? Here's a good tutorial for "gdb": cs.cmu.edu/~gilpin/tutorial
    – paulsm4
    Apr 18, 2013 at 23:35
  • 5
    1) buffer[strlen(buffer)-1] = '\0'; Bad habit, IMHO. strlen() could return zero. 2) tok = strtok (temp," "); tok shadows another tok Apr 18, 2013 at 23:36
  • 2
    cd can't be a standalone program, it has to be a shell builtin. What exactly are you trying to do?
    – Carl Norum
    Apr 18, 2013 at 23:44
  • 3
    cd is a shell command; the system call is chdir. And your code doesn't implement chdir, it merely calls it. Apr 18, 2013 at 23:47
  • 1
    Furthermore, fgets() returns the number of characters read and guarantees to NULL-terminate the buffer. Might also want to consider whether while (buffer!=NULL) can ever evaluate false, with buffer being on the stack?
    – marko
    Apr 18, 2013 at 23:47

3 Answers 3

10
+50

Have updated the logic after suggestions from others.

There is no need for a child process here. If you want multitasking then use threads. Child process may be required for process running in background.

The following program is working for me:

#include <stdio.h>

#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <dirent.h>
//#include <error.h>

int hasPrefix(char const *, char const *);
int cd(char *pth);

#define BUFFERSIZE 200
int main(){

    char buffer[BUFFERSIZE];
    char *prompt = "OS";
    char *a = ">";

    char *tok;
    tok = strtok (buffer," ");


    while(buffer != NULL){
        bzero(buffer, BUFFERSIZE);
        printf("%s%s",prompt,a);
        fgets(buffer, BUFFERSIZE, stdin);
        if(hasPrefix(buffer,"cd") == 0){
            tok = strchr(buffer,' '); //use something more powerful
            if(tok) {
                char *tempTok = tok + 1;
                tok = tempTok;
                char *locationOfNewLine = strchr(tok, '\n');
                if(locationOfNewLine) {
                    *locationOfNewLine = '\0';
                }
                cd(tok);
            }
        }else{
            system("ls"); //for testing the CWD/PWD
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

int hasPrefix(char const *p, char const *q)
{
    int i = 0;
    for(i = 0;q[i];i++)
    {
        if(p[i] != q[i])
            return -1;
    }
    return 0;
}

int cd(char *pth){
    char path[BUFFERSIZE];
    strcpy(path,pth);

    char cwd[BUFFERSIZE];
    if(pth[0] != '/')
    {// true for the dir in cwd
        getcwd(cwd,sizeof(cwd));
        strcat(cwd,"/");
        strcat(cwd,path);
        chdir(cwd);
    }else{//true for dir w.r.t. /
        chdir(pth);
    }

    return 0;
}
5
  • 4
    What's wrong with the standard strcmp() that requires writing his own.
    – Barmar
    May 8, 2015 at 19:29
  • You should not have suggested using a homebrew mystrcmp, and you've inadvertently demonstrated just why. The standard strcmp has nothing wrong here, while yours does. It has two bugs: 1. If q is an empty string (""), you will always report equality and 2. If the string p has the string q as a prefix but has trailing additional characters, it will report equality. It would have been better to chop off the newline from fgets() with this one-liner. May 9, 2015 at 16:27
  • @Barmar Its been 1 year since I looked on this. I don't remember why I said it. If strcmp is right for you then you can use it.
    – bikram990
    May 11, 2015 at 6:29
  • 1
    @DanielJour thanks for pointing out. I've updated the answer now.
    – bikram990
    Feb 15, 2016 at 9:17
  • @Barmar Actaully I wanted a hasPrefix method and named the method as mystrcmp and blamed the standard strcmp. Now realizing that How foolish I was to blame standard strcmp.
    – bikram990
    Feb 15, 2016 at 9:20
3

Use

...
if(strncmp(buffer,"cd",2) == 0){
...

instead. It is good for comparing prefixes of arbitrary length. It's also puts a limit on string size. No need to build your own comparison routine.

You have other problems elsewhere in the code, but those can be addressed separately.

1

I think the problem is because of this line:

buffer[strlen(buffer)-1] = '\0'; 

This replaces the last character of buffer with a null character. So if buffer contained "cd", it now contains just "c" (since the null character is the string terminator in C).

There doesn't seem to be any need for this statement, just remove it.

1
  • Just stumbled upon this, and this is really the only correct answer. Feb 11, 2016 at 18:54

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.