364

I am curious as to why df[2] is not supported, while df.ix[2] and df[2:3] both work.

In [26]: df.ix[2]
Out[26]: 
A    1.027680
B    1.514210
C   -1.466963
D   -0.162339
Name: 2000-01-03 00:00:00

In [27]: df[2:3]
Out[27]: 
                  A        B         C         D
2000-01-03  1.02768  1.51421 -1.466963 -0.162339

I would expect df[2] to work the same way as df[2:3] to be consistent with Python indexing convention. Is there a design reason for not supporting indexing row by single integer?

  • 4
    df.ix[2] does not work - at least not in pandas version '0.19.2' – Zahra May 4 '17 at 19:54
  • 9
    To see the difference between row and column selection via the indexing operator, [], see this answer below. Also NEVER USE .ix, it is deprecated – Ted Petrou Nov 5 '17 at 19:43
515

echoing @HYRY, see the new docs in 0.11

http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/indexing.html

Here we have new operators, .iloc to explicity support only integer indexing, and .loc to explicity support only label indexing

e.g. imagine this scenario

In [1]: df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.rand(5,2),index=range(0,10,2),columns=list('AB'))

In [2]: df
Out[2]: 
          A         B
0  1.068932 -0.794307
2 -0.470056  1.192211
4 -0.284561  0.756029
6  1.037563 -0.267820
8 -0.538478 -0.800654

In [5]: df.iloc[[2]]
Out[5]: 
          A         B
4 -0.284561  0.756029

In [6]: df.loc[[2]]
Out[6]: 
          A         B
2 -0.470056  1.192211

[] slices the rows (by label location) only

  • 6
    What if you wanted the 2nd AND 3rd AND 4th row? – FaCoffee Nov 7 '16 at 20:36
  • 1
    you can simply pass a list of indexers; docs are pointed to above – Jeff Nov 7 '16 at 20:37
  • 2
    Does anyone have a justification for these names? I find these hard to remember because I'm not sure why iloc is rows and loc is labels. – kilojoules Apr 5 '17 at 17:58
  • 3
    @kilojoules .iloc looks things up by their order in the index (e.g. .iloc[[2]]) is the second "row" in df. That row happens to be at index location 4. .loc looks them up by their index value. So maybe "iloc" is like "i" as in A[i]? :) – Jim K. Nov 7 '17 at 21:47
  • 1
    @Jeff - this works great, but what happens when you want to duplicate a row from your data frame, such as df.loc[-1] = df.iloc[[0]], and insert that? The frame comes with an added index column giving error ValueError: cannot set a row with mismatched columns (see stackoverflow.com/questions/47340571/…) – Growler Nov 16 '17 at 23:14
55

The primary purpose of the DataFrame indexing operator, [] is to select columns.

When the indexing operator is passed a string or integer, it attempts to find a column with that particular name and return it as a Series.

So, in the question above: df[2] searches for a column name matching the integer value 2. This column does not exist and a KeyError is raised.


The DataFrame indexing operator completely changes behavior to select rows when slice notation is used

Strangely, when given a slice, the DataFrame indexing operator selects rows and can do so by integer location or by index label.

df[2:3]

This will slice beginning from the row with integer location 2 up to 3, exclusive of the last element. So, just a single row. The following selects rows beginning at integer location 6 up to but not including 20 by every third row.

df[6:20:3]

You can also use slices consisting of string labels if your DataFrame index has strings in it. For more details, see this solution on .iloc vs .loc.

I almost never use this slice notation with the indexing operator as its not explicit and hardly ever used. When slicing by rows, stick with .loc/.iloc.

  • Trying to add rows to another dataframe using indxeing operator but the other dataframe remains empty. Why? – FindOutIslamNow Sep 10 '18 at 10:10
23

You can think DataFrame as a dict of Series. df[key] try to select the column index by key and returns a Series object.

However slicing inside of [] slices the rows, because it's a very common operation.

You can read the document for detail:

http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/indexing.html#basics

14

To index-based access to the pandas table, one can also consider numpy.as_array option to convert the table to Numpy array as

np_df = df.as_matrix()

and then

np_df[i] 

would work.

  • 10
    that defeats the whole purpose of the dataframes indexes and everything else pandas offers – Fábio Dias Nov 29 '17 at 16:56
7

You can take a look at the source code .

DataFrame has a private function _slice() to slice the DataFrame, and it allows the parameter axis to determine which axis to slice. The __getitem__() for DataFrame doesn't set the axis while invoking _slice(). So the _slice() slice it by default axis 0.

You can take a simple experiment, that might help you:

print df._slice(slice(0, 2))
print df._slice(slice(0, 2), 0)
print df._slice(slice(0, 2), 1)
6

you can loop through the data frame like this .

for ad in range(1,dataframe_c.size):
    print(dataframe_c.values[ad])